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THE BLUE STOCKING 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 
CLINTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



BEGINS: 7 FEBRUARY 1992. 



FILMED JUNE 2006 
BY TIM BRIGHT FOR 
THE SOUTH CAROLINIANA LIBRARY, 
FROM THE ORIGINAL FILES IN 
POSESSION OF PRESBYTERIAN 
COLLEGE. 



THE SOUTH CAROLINIANA LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 
COLUMBIA, S.C. 29208 



Volumes of I*r('sl)\ti'ri;in ( ollc^jc's lilm' Stinking 



V. 66. nos. 14. IS. 20. 21. and 2.^ (h>S3) 

V. 67 6S.n()s. I h) (l^)S4) 

Note: voliimt' niimbcr changes afUr first issue 
V. 69. iu)s, I 15 (l%5..lim. Apr. ) 

V. SO. DOS. I 27 (Sept. 1985 Apr. 1986) 

Note: Jump in >()lume luniibers is because an error with Roman numerals 

was never corrected 
Special issue August .U), 19,S6 



V. ,Sl.iH)s. 1-23 

Note: issue //1 9 is in two parts 

V. 82. iios. I 21 

Note: issue #18 is in two parts 
V. 83.nos. 1 15 
V. 84, iu)s. I 13 

Note: issue //1 2 is in two parts 
V. 85. nos. I \() 
V. 86, iu)s. I 1 2 
V. 87. nos. I 10 
V. 8S. nos. I 10 
V. 89. nos, I 10 
V. 91.iu>s. I 10 

Note: volume #90 was skipped 
V. 92, nos. 1 10 
V. 93. nos. I 10 

Note: issue #9 is numbered #S,5) 
V, 94. nos. 113 ^ 
V. 95, nos. 1 A^^ 

Note: issue #12 is in two parts 
V. 9(), nos. I 14 
V. 97, nos. I 16 
V. 98, nos. I 15 
V. 99. nos. I 14 



(Sept. 19S() Apr. 

(Sept. hAS" Apr. 

(Sept. l9S8-Apr. 
(Sept. 19X9 Apr. 

(Sept. 1990 Apr. 

(Sept. 1991 May 

(Sept. 1992- Apr. 

(Sept. 1993- Apr. 

(Sept. 1994- Apr. 

(Sept. 1995 Apr. 

(Sept. 1996 A[)r. 
(Sept. 1997 Apr. 



987 

98 S 

989 
990 

991 
992 
993 
994 
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996 

997 
998 



(Sept. 1998 Apr. 1999 
(Sept. 1999 Apr. 2000 

(Sept. 2000 Apr. 2001 
(Sept. 2001 Apr. 2002 
(Sept 2002 Apr. 2003 
(Sept 2003 Apr. 2004 



THIS MICROFILM EDITION IS MADE 



FROM THE MOST COMPLETE SET OF 



ORIGINAL ISSUES AVAILABLE AT 



THE TIME OF FILMING. IT HAS BEEN 



PRODUCED UNDER STRICT QUALITY 



CONTROL MEASURES. THE QUALITY 



OF THE IMAGES MAY REFLECT THE 



DEGRADATION OF THE ORIGINALS' 



PAPER AND INK, AND DUE TO A LACK 



OF CONTRAST, SOME PAGES MAY 



NOT HAVE REPRODUCED WELL. 



NOTE: 

THIS ROLL CONTAINS 

INTENTIONAL SECOND 

EXPOSURES DUE TO 

PHOTOGRAPHS, FADE CHANGES, 

AND ILLUSTRATIONS. ALSO, 

GAPS IN PAGINATED MATERIALS 

MAY BE PRESENT, AS BLANK 

PAGES ARE NOT FILMED. 



1992 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LJCXXVl Number 8 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way. " 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. South Carolina 29325 



Friday, February 7, iOW- 



Students injured in Fraternity Court weekend violence 



From Staff Reports 

This past weekend, PC's Fraternity 
Coun was the scene of two separate violent 
incidents. 

Friday night, John 
Broadway was struck in 
the head with a bottle 
by PC alumni Brad 
Tarbertal the Sigma Nu 
house. Broadway is a 
freshman and pledge for 
Pi Kappa Alpha frater- 
nity. After the incident 
took place, Broadway 
was taken to the Laurens 
County Hospital for 
treatment. On Satur- 
day, he was taken to the 
Greenville Memorial 
Hospital, where he was 
treated for a mild con- 
cussion and for a bkx)d 
blister on the right side 
of his brain. 

On Saturday night, 
a separate incident U)ok 
place in front of the Pi J<)hn BroadWiy 
Kappa Alpha hoase. MikeNix,aseniorand 
a Sigma Nu, was hospitalized as a result of 
a broken nose after a confrontation with Pi 
Kappa Alpha pledge, Gary Smith. 

When asked about the violence of this 




past weekend, Joe Nixon, dean of students, 

refused to comment and advised the Blue 

Stocking not to pnnt the story. 

The Blue Slocking al so requested a copy 

of the incident report regarding the events of 
the past weekend. 
According to Public 
Safety Chief Grey 
Mayson, no incident 
report had been filed 
as of late Wednesday 
evening, even though 
both incidents resulted 
in injury to students 
and occurred on the 
PC campus. 

However, according 
10 Mayson, both he 
and Broadway met 
with Judge J.M. 
Copcland, a state mag- 
istrate, on Wednes- 
day. Copcland ad- 
vised May.son to con- 
tinue to investigate the 
situation, and he re- 
tilepnoto quested statements 
from individuals. 

"Victims have the choice to press 
charges or not. It is not something that PC 
can do in this incident," said Mayson. 
As a result of the violence that occurred 



over the weekend, the Inter-Fraiemity Coun- 
cil met on Monday night At that meeting 
the IFC placed a ban on the two fraternities 
that were involved. 

In a letter to the Blue Stocking, IFC 
President Paul Bass 
stated, "A ban, effec- 
tive immediately, was 
placed on each of the 
two fraternities in- 
volved, keeping indi- 
viduals from one frater- 
nity frcwn entering the 
other's house. A sec- 
ond regulation was 
passed to ensure that no 
further conflicts would 
occur between the two 
fraternities. Accord- 
ingly, members of both 
fraternities were warned 
that any further alterca- 
tion wou Id be deal t w i th 
by a S 100 fine, suspen- 
sion from Fraternity 
Court for the remainder 
of the year, and referral 
of the incident to the PC j^iji^^ j^i. 
Judicial Council as a 
Code of Conduct violation." 

At IPC's request. Bass's letter made no 
specific reference to the individuals involved 
or to the fraternities involved; however. 



Blue Stocking sources have identified both. 
Bass also stated that the presidents of 
the involved fraternities agreed to the new 
regulations and ensured that their members 
would comply. 

In addition, the IFC 
decided to revise its 
policy on altercations. 
"Any fraternity man 
involved in an alter- 
cation will be fined 
S 1 00 and banned from 
the Fraternity Court 
for four months. If an 
independent man is 
involved in an alter- 
cation he will be 
banned from the fra- 
ternity houses and the 
matter will be referred 
to the Judicial Coun- 
ci\" said Bass in his 
letter. 

According to Bass, the 
IFC has also sched- 
fik photo ulcd a forum on fra- 
ternity relations for Wednesday, February 
1 2. A time and location fcx the forum will be 
set on Monday. Bass urges all fraternity 
members to attend. 




Annual Arnold Sympsium to 'test our presuppositions' 



News Release 

While planning Presbyterian College's 
1992 Arnold Symposium, Dr. James Skin 
ner wanted to bring forth a controversial 
l(^ic that would allow people to test their 
current beliefs. 

Dr. Skinner, the symposium cowdi- 
nator, said this year's topic of "The Media 
and the Third World," U) be held February 
17- 19 at the college, may hit closer to home 
than people think. 

"This symposium, morc than any of the 
preceding five, will work on the audience 
more. They will definitely be a large part of 
this symposium," Dr. Skinner said. 'There 
will be a lot of information coming from the 
ptxlium that will be totally new to people, 
and for that reason it will be more important. 
Here IS a topic that causes us to reach t)ut to 
the unknown. It's a subject thai is uncom- 
fortable for us. Rut if you're going to grow, 
you've got loreach, and it's umc that wo lest 
our prejudices and presuppositions." 

Helping the audience test their beliefs 
will be four nationally renowrK'dexjvrts on 
the Third World, as well as a panel of Pres- 
byterian College faculty members. The 



sympt)sium will open on Monday , February 
17, with a panel dis- 
cussion at 8: 15 p.m. in 
Edmunds Hall. The 
discussion will f(Kus 
on where and how 
Amencans learn about 
the Third World, and 
how they can improve 
their knowledge and 
understanding about 
those countries. 

"I think an impor- 
tant aspect of the en- 
tire symposium is that 
opening forum, " Dr. 
Skinner said. 'That's 
when the audience will 
be asked. 'Where did 
you get your inlorma- 
uon and ideas'' 1 think 
a lot of people will 
lc;im that they have not 
been given a clear pic- 
ture of the Third 
World." 

The first of three program.'»on Tuesday. 
Felxuary 1 8. is planned for 1 1 a.m. when Dr. 
Edward Said, a frequent guest on ABC 




Dr. lack Shaheen 



TV's "Nightiine," appears in Belk Audito- 
rium. Currently Pro- 
fessor of English and 
Comparative Litera- 
ture aiColumbia Uni- 
versity, Dr. Said is 
widely regarded as 
the most prominent 
American spokes- 
man for the Arab 
cause. His many 
books deal with 
Western misconcep- 
tions of Islam and the 
Orient, misconcep- 
tions rooted in essen- 
tially hostile stereo- 
types. 

The symposium will 

continue at 2: 15 p.m. 

in Edmunds Hall, 

when Dr. Thomas W 

Walker aildresses the 

file photo ts.sueof Latin Amen- 

can Studies at Ohio 

University, Dr. Walker served as a member 

of the Latin American Studies As.sociaiion's 

delegation sent to observe the 1990 Nicara- 



guan elections. 

Rounding out symposium events on 
Fcbruar)' 18 will be former pnnt and bn^d- 
casi joumali.st Jack Shaheen. currently Pro- 
fessor of Mass Communications at South- 
ern Illinois University, writes often about 
"Our Cultural Demon: the Ugly Arab," in 
which he expkxes stereotypes of Arabs as 
"camel jockeys and ragheads." 

The sixth annual Arrwld Symposium 
will close on February 19, when Wall Street 
Journal reporter Jonathan Kwiiney speaks 
at 11 a.m. in Belk Auditonum. Having 
either lived or traveled in 9() countries, 
Kwitney is the author of Endless Enemies: 
the Making of an Unfriendly World, which 
was a Book-of-the-Month Club selection. 

"Because of our stereotypes, we dt^'l 
look on the people in the Third World as 
human beings," Dr. Skinner said. "Look at 
the terminology - Third World. It's like a 
tlurd-class uckei that nobody wants. When 
you use that word third, there is an implica- 
tion that something is not important. We're 
talking about the majority of the world's 
population m these countries, but we simply 
tend to view the Third World as a probtem. " 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVI Number 8 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. South Carolma 29325 



Friday. February 7. Vm- 



Students injured in Fraternity Court weekend violence 



From Staff Reports 

This past weekend. PC's Fralemily 
Court was the scene of two separate violent 
incidents. 

Friday night, John 
Broadway was struck in , 
the head with a bottle 
by PC alumni Brad 
Tarbert at the Sigma Nu 
house. Broadway is a 
freshnian and pledge for 
Pi Kappa Alpha frater- 
nity. After the incident 
look place, Broadway 
was taken to the Laurens 
County Hospital for 
ueaimenL On Satur- 
day, he was taken to the 
Greenville Memorial 
Hospital, where he was 
treated for a mild con- 
cussion and for a blood 
blister on the nght side 
of his brain. 

On Saturday night, 
a separate incident ux>k 
place in front of the Pi John BroadiVay 
Kappa Alpha house. Mike Nix, a senior and 
a Sigma Nu, was hospitalized as a result of 
a broken nose after a confrontation with Pi 
Kappa Alpha pledge. Gary Smith. 

When asked about the violence of this 




past weekend, Joe Nixon, dean of students, 

refused to comment and advised the Blue 

Stocking not to print the story. 

The B/u^ 5toc/fc/>i J? also requested a copy 

of the incident report regarding the events of 
the past weekend. 
According to Public 
Safety Chief Grey 
Mayson, no incident 
report had been filed 
as of late Wednesday 
evening, even though 
both incidents resulte^i 
in injury to students 
and (Kcurred on the 
PC campus. 

However, according 
to Mayson, both he 
and Broadway met 
with Judge J.M. 
Copeland, a state mag- 
istrate, on Wednes- 
day. Copeland ad- 
vised Mayson to con- 
unue to investigate the 
situation, and he re- 
lik-i^T^oio quested statements 
from individuals. 

"Victims have the choice to press 
charges or not. It is not something that PC 
can do in this incident," said Mayson. 
As a result of the violence that occurred 



overthe weekend, the Inter-Fratemily Coun- 
cil met on Monday night At that meeting 
the IFC placed a ban on the two fraternities 
that were involved. 

In a letter to the Blue Stocking, CFC 
President Paul Bass 
stated, "A ban, effec- 
tive immediately, was 
placed on each of the 
two fraternities in- 
volved, keeping indi- 
viduals from one frater- 
nity from entering the 
other's house. A sec- 
ond regulation was 
passed to ensure that no 
further conflicts would 
occur between the two 
fraternities. Accord- 
ingly, members of both 
fraternities were warned 
that any further alterca- 
tion would be dealt with 
by a S 100 fine, suspen- 
sion from Fraternity 
Court for the remainder 
of the year, and referral 
of the incident to the PC 
Judicial Council as a 
Code of Conduct violation." 

At IPC's request. Bass's letter made no 
specific reference to the individuals involved 
or to the fraternities involved; however, 



Mike Nix 



Blue Stocking sources have identified both. 
Bass also stated that the presidents of 
the involved fraternities agreed to the new 
regulations and ensured that their members 
would comply. 

In addition, the IFC 
decided to revise its 
policy (XI altercations. 
"Any fraternity man 
involved in an alter- 
cation will be fined 
$ 1 00 and banned from 
the Fraternity Court 
for four months. If an 
independent man is 
involved in an alter- 
cation he will be 
banned from the fra- 
ternity houses and the 
matter will be referred 
to the Judicial Coim- 
cil," said Bass in his 
letter. 

According to Bass, the 
IFC has also sched- 
file i*oto uled a forum on fra- 
ternity relations for Wednesday, February 
1 2. A time and location for the forum will be 
set on Monday. Bass urges all fraternity 
members to attend. 




Annual Arnold Sympsium to 'test our presuppositions' 



News Release 

While planning Presbyterian College's 
1992 Arnold Symposium. Dr. James Skin 
ner wanted to bnng forth a controversial 
topic that would allow people to test their 
current beliefs. 

Dr. Skinner, the symposium coordi- 
nator, said this year's topic of "The Media 
and the Third World." to be held February 
17- 19 at the college, may hit closer to home 
than people think 

"This sympi)sium. more than luiy of the 
preceding five, will work on the audience 
more. They will definitely be a large part of 
this symposium," Dr. Skinner said. 'There 
will be a lot of infomiation coming from the 
pcxlium that will be U)tally new to people, 
and for that reason ii will be more imporiiint. 
Here is a topic that causes us to reach out to 
the unknown. It's a subject that is uncom 
lortablc for us. But if you're going in grow, 
you've got to reach, ami it's umc that wc test 
our prejudices and presupp«^)sitions." 

Helping the audience lest their beliets 
will be four nationallyrcnowrKdex|ierts on 
the I'hird World, as well as a panel of Pres 
bylcrian College faculty members. The 



symposium will open on Monday, February 

17, with a panel dis- 

cassionat8:15p.m.in 

Edmunds Hall. The 

discussion will f(Kus 

on where and how 

Amencans learn about 

the Third World, and 

how they can improve 

their knowledge and 

understanding about 

those countries. 

"1 think an impor- 
tant aspect of the en 
tire symposium is that 
opening forum, " Dr. 
Skinner said "That's 
when the audience will 
be asked, 'Where did 
you get your infomia 
Uonmuliilcas'' 1 think 
a lot of people will 
lo;im that ihcy have not 
been given aclearpK 
lure of the Third 
World" 

l"he first of three program.ton Tuesday, 
February 1 8, is planned for 1 1 a.m. when Dr. 
FUlward Said, a frequent guest on ABC 




Dr. lack Shaheen 



TV's "NighUine," appears in Belk Audito- 
rium. Currently Pro- 
fessor of English and 
Comparative Litera- 
ture atColumbiaUni- 
versity, Dr. Said is 
widely regarded as 
tiK most prominent 
American spokes- 
man for the Arab 
cause. His many 
books deal with 
Western misconcep- 
tions of Islam and the 
Orient, misconcep- 
tions rooted in essen- 
tially hostile stereo 
i>pcs 

The symposium will 

continue at 2: 15 p.m. 

m Edmunds Hall, 

when Dr. Thomas W. 

Walker aildresscs the 

file |*oto issucof Latin Amen- 

can Studies at Ohio 

University, Dr. Walker served as a member 

of the l^un Amencan Studies Association's 

delegation sent to observe the 1990 Nicara- 



guan elections. 

Rounding out symposium events on 
February 1 8 will be former pnnt and broad- 
cast journalist Jack Shaheen, currently Pro- 
fessor of Ma.vs Communications at South- 
ern Illinois University, writes often about 
"Our Cultural Demon: the Ugly Arab," in 
which he explores stereotypes of Arabs as 
"camel jockeys and ragheads." 

The sixth annual Arnold Symposium 
will close on February 19. when Wall Street 
Journal reporter Jonathan Kwitney speaks 
at 11 a.m. in Belk Auditonum. Having 
either lived or raveled m 90 countries, 
Kwitney is the author of Endless Enemies: 
the Making of an Unfriendly World, which 
was a Book-of-the- Month Club selection. 

"Because of our stereotypes, we d«i'i 
look on the people in the Third World as 
human beings." Dr. Skinner said. "Look at 
the terminology - Third World. It's like a 
third-class ucketthat nob(xly wants. When 
you use that word third, there is an implica- 
tion that stimethmg is not important. We're 
talking about the majority of the wiM^ld's 
population in these counuies. but wc simply 
tend to view the Third World as a probtem." 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



EDITORIAL 



Editor Concerned with Hypocrisy on Campus 



Dennie Lynn Hill 
Editor-in-Chief 

I was recently sitting and talking 
with my staff about our prestigious 
Presbyterian College and controversy 
and frustration filled the room. Is PC 
not the Utopia that we were all led to 
believe in? Could it be possible that 
this is not Wonderland? Do actual, 
real life problems exist here? Surely 
not. 

Yes, we may be a bit secluded 
here in the small, southern town of 
Clinton, South Carolina at a private, 
Presbyterian school of 1 1 50 students, 
but we do not live in a Utopia! So, 
why does the Administration try to 
pretend that we do? 

We are all aware of the events 
that occured last weekend at frater- 
nity court. I would venture to say 
that the ne wson the front page of this 
issue of the Blue Stocking was not 
actually 'news' to anyone on campus, 
butjustaclarification of the situation 
at hand. So, why then was my staff 
and myself led to feel as if we should 



^ng^&fi^ 






just sweep the events under the car- 
pet and go on with other important 
stories such as what hors d'oeuvres 
will be served at winter formal? What 
insolence! This is the student 
newspaper and the students deserve 
to know the facts about what happens 
on their campus. 

The first time the administra- 
tions attempt to alter what the students 
see and hear bothered me was last 
year on perspective student visitation 
day. The Blue Stocking had a table 
at the activities fair filled with past 
issues and an administrator requested 
that we remove all editions with 
controversial issues in them. 1 
thought, what is the point of jour- 
nalism if there are no thought pro- 
voking issues? Thought provoking 
issues often mean controversy, but 
what is wrong with that? Unfortu- 
nately, there wasn't a controversial 
issue in each edition. How I wished 
the entire table would have been 
empty. 



■«ug^<^® J 



I understand completely the 
college's concern about portraying a 
good image to perspective students, 
but should we deny the students the 
right to know the u-uth about our 
schooP This year on minority student 
visitaion day I noticed the school 
was suddenly void of the Blue 
Stocking edition that was just off the 
press the day before. Strange how 
over l(XX)copics just disappe;u-ed on 
one friday afternot.^n (They, unfor- 
tunately, usually linger in the halls 
for weeks). I was later told that there 
was concern about a letter lo the 
editor concerning racism on campus 
and thus the reason for the disap- 
pearing Blue Stockings. Well, that is 
one way to get an outstanding class 
of 1996 - let them think that nothing 
conffoversial happenson ourcampus. 
Even though they have seen other 
campus newspapers and read about 
the same issues our schtx)l deals with, 
let them believe our schcK)l is so 
different and then let them be so 



disappointed when they do not get 
what they were promised. 

1 hate to say the administration is 
to blame because it is not the entire 
administration. Many members ad- 
v(x:ateour investigative reporting and 
our interest in covering problem ar- 
eas on campus. Yet, there are a few 
who. because of their piisitions, feel 
the need lo pretend that the problems 
that do exist on our campus are not 
worthy of recognition by the students. 
I truly understand these people's 
position in that they need to portray 
the schcx)l in a positive manner at all 
times. But, long temi, I think that 
this type of behavior will only have a 
negative impact on our campus. 1 
ht>pe that next lime a staff reporter 
tries to find out the facts about a 
problemon campus they will be given 
the facts that they deserve to know 
and 1 hope that w hen the story appears 
in the Blue Stocking that it will be 
available for anyone lo read, 
persepciive student or not. 











Please note the Publication dates and deadlines for submissions to the 
Blue Stocking for the spring semester: 

FKBkl ARV 28 

MARCH 20 

APRIL 3 

APRIL 16 

APRIL 23 
Letters to the Editor must be in by midnight on the friday 
before the publication. 

Other information and submissions must \k made 10 days 
before the publication. 



The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton. South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVI. Number 8 
February 7. 1992 

Editor in chief Dennie Lynn Hill 

Managing Editor Jason West 

News Editor Paul Alkmson 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

Sports Editor Brad Busbee 

Entertainment Editor Angie Richardson 

Features Editor L^Jcanna Maddox 

Environment Editor.., Heather Moncnef 

Photography/Darkroom Angela Mills 

layout Editor Carolyn Nichols 

Copy Editor Mike Weaver 

Advertising Editor Ann Mayfield 

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Photography Staff: 

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Shva Garwood 



The Blue Slocking is a biweekly student 
publication of Presbyterian College, flic pajHrr 
serves as a forum of news and opinion of regional 
and national concern. For advertismg, contact 
The Blue Stocking, Presbyterian College, Box 
1061, Clinton, SC 2932') The Blur Slocking 
welcomes letters to the editor from all members 
of the PC community. Signatures arc required 
Letters are pnnlt-d on a space available bias The 
Blue Slocking reserves tlie right to edit all letters 
for proper grammar and punctuation. The final 
deadline for submitting letters is Friday at 
12;0(^m on the week before publication 







\'«80 



Letters to the editor-Letters to the editor-Letters to the editor 



Words from IFC President 

I am writing this letter as a response to 
the two incidents that occurred at Fraternity 
Court this past weekend. I am writing on the 
behalf of all the fraternities and not just a 
single one. I hope this will shed some light 
on the events that have caused such a stir on 
our Campus. 

Friday night, an individual was struck 
in the head with a bottle at one of the six 
houses at Fraternity Court. This individual 
was taken to the hospital and treated. The 
following night, another individual was 
hospitalized as a result of a separate inci- 
dent. This event occurred in front of an 
adjacent house. Immediately following this, 
two separate groups of individuals ap- 
proached each other with intentions of ret- 
ribution. Yet, this potentially inflammatory 
conflict was avoided. 

The Inter-Fratemity Council was forced 
toaci swiftly. A ban, effective immediaiely. 
was placed on each of the two fraiemiucs 
involved, keeping individuals from one fra- 
ternity from entering the other house. A 
second regulation was pas.scd lo ensure that 
no further conflicts would occur between 
the two fraternities. Accordingly, members 
of both fraiemilies were warned that any 
further altercauon would be dealt with by a 



$100 fine, suspension from Fraternity Court 
for the remainder of the year, and referral of 
the incident to PC Judicial Council as a 
Code of Conduct violation. The Presidents 
of each of the involved fraternities agreed to 
the regulations and ensured that their mem- 
bers would comply. 

After approving the two above regula- 
tions, the Inter-Fraternity Council decided 
to revise its policy on altercations. The 
following rules were passed unanimously. 
Any fraternity man involved m an alterca- 
tion would be fined $100 and banned from 
the Fraternity Court for four months. If an 
independent man is involved in an alterca- 
tion he will be banned from the fraternity 
houses and the matter will be referred to the 
PC Judicial Council. 

A call was made for a Forum on Fra- 
ternity Relations. The IFC took this into 
consideration and .scheduled a forum for 
Wednesday, February 12. A time and lo- 
cation will be set Monday. All fraternity 
members are strongly encouraged to attend 
the forum. 



Field trip to former Soviet Union 



To the Editor, 

1 am working lo put together, for PC 
students who are interested, an after-gradu- 
ation field tnp to Moscow and St. Petersburg 
(Leningrad) in the former Soviet Union. 
Arrangements are being made through 
Friendship Force in Atlanta. I cordially 
invite students who have an interest in the 
former Soviet Union and the incredible 
changes taking place there to join this group 
(ideally 15-25 in number) and me for this 
adventure. 

Under the tentative plans as they now 
stand, the group leaves Atlanta around May 
1 2, flies to Moscow for a week of "homestay " 
(living in Russian homes) and tounng, then 



goes by train for a 2-3 day stay in St. Peters- 
burg. Overnighting in Amsterdam, perhaps, 
on the return home, we are to arrive back in 
Atlanta aaround May 23. Friendship Forces 
estimates total price (roundtrip flights, meals, 
accomodations, travel, visa fees, etc.) at less 
than $2,000. 

I am grateful to The Blue Stocking for 
allowing me to make this announcement 
Interested students should contact me 
(Neville 109. or telephone 8352) asi^saui 

Sincerely, 
David Gillespie 
Political Science 



Student finds CEP speaker offensive 



Thank you, 
Paul H. Bass 
President - IFC 



Words on what fraternaties and sororities have to offer 



Dear Editor, 

It was a beautiful Friday afternoon in 
January. The sun was shining, the sky was 
clear, and the temperature was warm. It 
was, in fact, last Friday, January 3 1 st I had 
just completed my week's work when, from 
my office, I heard the revels and cries of 
young men declaring themselves "broth- 
ers." What warmth! Whatmirth! What joy! 
My heart was full. 

1 am also most pleased that some of those 
individuals saw fit lo mviie me, albeit in- 
advertently, to stay and watch their merry- 
making. Thank you so much for parallel 
parking your very large vehicle behind my 
little car. (How could you have known 1 love 
to drive and also test my driving skills?) 
That's the only possible reason you could 
have parked behind me, leaving empty the 
two parking spaces to my left. 

Oh, the fun I had as I cranked my steenng 



wheel (sans power steering) first to the right 
(so I could back up into the two feet of room 
whch you quite thoughtlully left between 
our two vehicles) then to the left ( so 1 could 
creep forward just that much closer to free- 
dom). Back and forth, left and nght. Once 
again, my heart was full. Instead of a quiet 
walk with my dog, 1 had the rare chance to 
see young men clasp one another in warm 
embraces - breast to breast - unashamed by 
their emotional displays. 

After I slowly inched my car into a 
wonderfully tight U-turn and then out onto 
Adair Street I regretfully left this fine ex- 
hibition of male bonding behind and turned 
towards home. Those who think fratemiues 
and soronties have nothing to offer should 
have been in the car with me. 

Sincerely, 
Gina Prosch 



The Blue Stocking encourages all 

students, faculty, administration, and 

others in the community to write 

letters to the editor. The letters are 

due on the Friday before the issue is 

published. Thank you for your support. 



Dear Miss Hill, 

I attended the Cultural Enrichment 
Program m Belk Auditonum on Monday, 
Jaunary 20. 1 had expectations of hearing 
how the Open Door Program has helped the 
AilaniaCommunity fulfill Dr. IVlartin Luther 
King Jr.'s "Dream," or something relating 
to this holiday. Instead, 1 was nauseated by 
the ranting and raving of a disillusioned and 
obviously disturbed woman named Murphy 
Davis. 

Ms. Davis began her lecture by telling 
us how a black man, whom she felt was 
completely innocent was executed for be- 
ing "associated" with someone who mur- 
dered a white woman. She thought this was 
completely unjust punishment basing it on 
purely racial prejudice. FricrKl, I am here to 
tell you that regardless of the race of the 
cnminal or the victim, accessory to munfcr 
IS worthy of punishment. (I will not digress 
on the issue of capital punishment however.) 

Ms. Murphy Davis has evidently never 
experienced love from someone of the male 
gender m a healthy relationship. She began 
a "Male Bashing" tirade by quoting statis- 
tics of wives beaten by their husbands. She 
then insulted both male and female students 
when she stated that over half of the females 
in the audience would marry a man who 
would beat her. This suggests to me that 
over half of the men at PC will beat their 
wives. Ms. Davis' statement also msults the 
intelligence of PC.women. She insinuates 
that girls that are my friends will lack the 
character judgement tochooseaproper mate. 
I find 11 hard to believe thai women attend- 
ing a school of such high academic caliber 
could make such a grave misjudgement on 
such a widespread scale as Ms. Davis sug- 
gests. 

It became increasingly evident that Ms. 
Davis was an ardent feminist, the type that 
most mainstream men and women despise. 
Men fear such women becaase of their radical 
power-hungry ideas. Women despise such 
feminists because they cloud the concept of 
equality with their radical ideology mA thus 
damage the credibility of the typical woman 
m Amenca icxlay. Also these feminists 
typically have a masculine appearance. 



wearing short hair, no make-up and possess- 
ing the general appearance of a "dyke." The 
average American Woman wishes to be 
treated as equal to men but does not desire to 
be associated with such a stereotype. 

After recovering from this insult to my 
chauvinistic caveman tendencies, Ms. Davis 
approached economic issiKS with idealistic 
and unreasonable theories. I gathered that 
she believed Sam Walton to be a selfish 
crook who stole from the poor to buy ex- 
pensive toys. Sam Walton is one of my 
personal heroes. This man pioneered Wal- 
Mart to be one of the most successful retail 
chains in the nation. His stores employ 
thousands of middle and lower class 
Americans. Sam Walton is the Amencan 
Dream incarnate. Ms. Davis suggests that it 
IS bad for such a man to be so successful. 
She wishes to redistribute his wealth to the 
poor in Amenca This economic policy has 
been tried before Ms. Davis. It was used m 
the former Soviet Union. Yes, the result is 
society wiiboui social classes — everyone is 
poor. We now can sec that the Soviet Union 
is seeing the light of capiiahsm as it enters 
into the infancy stages of a free-market 
economy. 

Ms. Davis also instructed me to throw a 
heavy object into the screen (rfmy tckvision. 
1 thought of all that 1 would be missing if I 
destroyed my Window to the World. I 
remembered exactly one year ago when we 
all gathered in our dorm rooms to waich the 
events unfold in the Persian Gulf — LIVE 
on TV. How dare this woman insult my 
intelligence by suggesting that all college 
students do is waste time watching only 
MTV. Pro Wrestling, and Soaps. 

1 understand that the purpose of Cultural 
Ennchmeni Programs is to broaden our 
backgrounds m the areas an, literature, 
politics, etc. However. 1 fail to see any true 
literary, political, artistic, or social value to 
Ms. Davis' lecture and I sincerely hope that 
a litlk more research is done before my 
tuition money pays for another socialist 
radical to give such a truly pointless lecture. 

Sincerely, 
Warren Blanchard 



NEWS 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



PC plans variety of events to celebrate Black History Month 



Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Although Black History Month does 
not officially begin until February 1 , Pres- 
byterian College has already gouen a head 
start on events with a lecture on Thursday, 
January 16, featuring Dr. Jerman Disasa. 

"Black History Month shouldn't be 
looked at simply as the month of February. 
The actual knowledge and teaching of black 
history should go on 365 days a year," said 
Chon Glover, Coordinator of Minority Af- 
fairs. "That's what we're hoping to achieve 
at Presbyterian College and we hope others 
wiU follow." 

Dr. Disasa, a native African who now 
worics in the Department of Educational 
Leadership and Policies at the University of 
South Carolina, opened the six week sched- 
ule of Black History Month events at PC 
with his lecture 'Turning Difficulties into 



Opportunities." 

Inaddition to Dr. Eisasa's lature, other 
Black History Month events scheduled at 
Presbyterian College are: 

*A look at the origins of African- 
American music at 7 pm on Feb. 2 in Edmunds 
Hall. The guest speaker will be Dr. Horace 
Clarence Boyer, a professor of music theory 
and Afro- American music at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Boyer also 
serves as director of the Vocal Jazz and Afro- 
American Music Ensemble at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

*A program featuring professional 
orator Dr. Patricia Russell -McCloud, J. D., at 
1 1 am on Feb. 4 in Belk Auditonum. The 
president of Russell-McCloud and Associ- 
ates in Atlanta, and a former senior managing 
attwney for the Federal Communications 
Commission in Washington, Dr. Russell- 
McCloud is noted for her dynamic delivery 
of research and statistical data in a manner 



that is both entertaining and informative. 

*A Gospel Extravagan/a featuring 
the Presbyterian College Fellowship Choir 
and other choirs from South Carolina col- 
leges and churches at 7 p.m. on Feb. 9 in 
Edmunds Hall. The evening of singing will 
feature two segments of gospel music. 

*The college's Black History Month 
Chapel Service, which is set for 1 1 am on 
February II, will feature Rev. Clinton 
Marsh. Marsh is a former president ol 
Knoxville College and mcxlerator ot the 
United Presbyterian Church m 1973. The 
PresbyterianCollegcFellowshipChoirwill 
also periorm at the .scr\'icc. 

*A program at 7 pm on Feb. 23 in 
Edmunds Hall featuring guest speaker Tom 
Jones of Columbia, SC, a nauonally-rc- 
nowned expert in the field of altomalive 
commuter transportation and u-ansporta- 
tion systems management. Biographical 
sketches of important blacks will be fea- 



tured. Jones is the president of Tom Jones 
and Company, a transportation, markcling, 
and personnel consulting firm in Columbia. 

*The one- woman show "Africa Fire," 
featuring acu-ess Vinnic Burrows, will be 
presented at H: 15 pm on Feb. 26 m Edmunds 
Hall. Burrows gathers African-American 
literature and history to conceive, prcxluce, 
direct and perform her one-woman showsof 
folk tales and dramatic readings. 

*llie movie. "A Dry White Sea.son," 
will be shown at 7 pm on Feb. 27 in 
Richardson Science Hall's Whitelaw Audi- 
torium. Setagamsi the background of South 
Africa in 1976. the film examines the dev- 
astation of two families - one black and one 
white - as they make a commitment U) expose 
the mju.stices of a minority-ruled country. 

All of the events during PC's Black 
History Month Celebration are free and open 
to the public. For more information, call 
833-K285. 



Open Door founders speak at annual Winter Conference Retreat 



By Paul Atkinson 

NEWS EDITOR 

The annual Winter Conference, which 
began in 1%9 as a way for members of 
different religious organizations to get to- 
gether so that they may better understand 
their similarities rather than their differences, 
was held on January 17-19 at Camp 
Bethelwoods near Rock Hill, SC. The key 
speakers at the retreat. Murphy Davis and 
Ed Loring, founded the Open Door Com- 
munity in Atlanta in 1981. 

Approximately 80 members of the PC 
community attended the conference, in- 
cluding nine of the PC faculty and staff. 

There were several group sessions, 
each designed to discuss topics which fo- 
cused on the theme of service. In addition to 
the study and discussion involved by those 
attending, there were other retreat activities, 
such as a bonfire, a hay nde, and an ice 
cream party. 

For the third consecutive year, the 
retreat featured a national recording artist as 
a song leader, as guitarist John Paul Wallers 
provided music for the group. 

Davis and Loring are both ordained 
Presbyterian ministers who have committed 
their Uves to befriending the homeless of 
Atlanta and inmates on Death Row in the 
Georgia Slate Prison System. The Open 
Door is a residential Christian community 



for the homeless , establ ished by the couple to 
draw attention to the need for affordable 
housing and human rights. The Open Door 
has become a u^adiiional outlet for volunteer 
service through Presbyterian College's Stu- 
dent Volunteer Services. 

The theme of service was based on the 
celebration of the 30th year of PC's Student 
Volunteer Services. Dr. Lonng, a l%3 
graduate of PC and a recipient of the Martin 
Luther King, Sr. Award, emphasized the 
need for passion in our lives. Some who 
attended thought Lonng's mes.sage offen- 
sive. Dr. Ron Bumside explains, 'The 
speakers wanted us to be more aware of the 
world situation. They brought to the confer- 
ence experiences we don't have, and their 
purpose was to stimulate thought. The ap- 
proach taken by Mr. Loring was a little 
strong, and it alienated some." 

On the whole, however, most inter- 
preted the expenence of Winter Conference 
as beneficial. Dr. Hobbie believes that Winter 
Conference was generally a positive experi- 
ence, even though he found offence with 
some of what Dr. Loring said. Dr. Hobbie 
does note, however, that "a challenge is 
sometimes offensive, and you have to get 
beyond that. 1 worry that some of the pa)plc 
who attended the conference were thrown 
off by the speaker's confrontational style. I 
hope people will not be turned off by style 
and miss the substance." 




Annual Fund phonathon scheduled 



io it»/^ nicphoU) 

Several P.C. students and Dr. Steven BuKgie Rather in front of Camp Bethelw(M)ds 
Christian Kducation Center at Winter Conference last January. 



Students to visit PC for lock-in 



The phones of PC's alumni soon will 
be ringing with student callers asking for 
support of the college in the annual 
phonathon which will be held from Febru- 
ary 5 through March 4. 

The ph(xiaihon secures nearly half of 
the gifts made each year to the Annual Fund. 
These gifts help provide needed financial 
assistance for students, faculty salaries, and 
current operational needs. 

The phonathon is also important be- 



cause a large number of al umni contributions 
attract large gifts from major corporations 
who consider alumni support a condiuon for 
making large gifts. 

Both organizations and individuals will 
have the chance to win cash pri/.cs and 
merchandise. In fact, a total of $9(X) in cash 
prizes will be given to organizations. 

Groups interested in participating 
should contact Jim Morton, director of the 
Annual Fund, at extention 8325. 



The second annual "Carolina All 
Nighter" is planned for February 8 • 9 at 
Presbyterian College and the Clinton Family 
YMCA. Sponsored by South Canilina 
Campus Ministries, the retreat is an 
oppontunity for senior high schotil students 
from 22 churches in South Carolina to 
make new friends and become better ac- 
quainted with Presbyterian campus minis- 
iry programs which await them when the 
students go off to college. 

Campus chaplains and interns will be 



present from The Citadel, SC Stale Uni- 
versity, The College of Charleston. Univer- 
sity of South Carolina. Clemson University. 
Winthrop, and K'. Fhc theme of this year's 
reucat will be "Celebrate life. " 

The students will participate in small 
grt)up atuvities led by students from the 
seven cainpases. Other activiues include 
workshops on missions, rtx reauonal events, 
a creative workshop, a dance, and a slide 
show on South Carolina Campus Ministries. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



POLITICS 



Presidential race offers everthing from Nazi to candidate in bikini briefs 



By Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

A year ago most people would have said 
the presidental race was no contest Bu.sh 
was expected to glide into office nding on 
his victory in the Persian Gulf. But the real 
world has other ideas, and the counu^ is 
suffenng from a recession that it just can't 
shake. In the wake of Bush's drop in popu- 
larity many contenders have popped up, and 
the race is no longer a sure bet. 

In Bush's own party there are two other 
contenders for the nomination: columnist 
Pat Buchanan and former Ku Klux Klan 
Grand Wizard David Duke. As for the 
Democrats, Arkansas' Bill Clinton is the 
current frontrunner, even with the 
unsustaciaied reports of an affair with a 
cabaret singer. Also up for the nomination 
are Nebraska Senator Bob Kerry, former 
California Governor Jerty Brown, Iowa 
Senator Tom Harkin, and the former Sena- 
tor from Ma.ssachusetts Paul Tsongas. 

Pat's strike from the right. Buchanan 
is shtx)ting hard for the GOP. nomination 
and attacking Bush for "letting down the 
American public" by going back on his no 
tax pledge. He claims to be Hue to the 
republican ideal in the spirit of Ronald 
Reagan. He is a conservative vintage 1930's 
and "America first" is his slogan for the '92 
campaign. While his views often ignore 
poliucal correctness, many people find the 
candor refreshing. 

Buchanan loves a good debate, a trait that 
helpedhimasacolumnist.asaspeachwntcr 
for Nixon and Reagan, and now as a presi- 
dential candidate. Yet many of his state- 
ments cause people to wonder how free of 
prejudice he really is. He has said that AIDS 
is God's punishment for gay people, refers 
to the homeless as free loaders, and suggested 
digging huge trenches to keep the Mexicans 
out 

Whether Buchanan turns out to be a 
David Duke in sheep's clothing, he is still 
causing prt)blems for the Bush campaign. 
Bush's people are publically saying that 
Buchanan may get 40% of the vote in the 
pnmary, while in private admit that his 
ceiling is around 25% (This is to make Bush 
kx)k gtXKl by doing belter than expected.) It 
has also been rept>ncd that Reagan was 
asked to speak on behalf of his fonner " vcx^p. " 
(He decUned.) At any rate, it's not all 
downhill for the education p-esident, even 
in his own party 

Best hope for the Demwrats. Bill 
Clinton has jumped into the fray running 
with his 15-piuge "Clinton Plan." In it, he 
tells his ideas on everything from tax struc- 
ture to defence. He's been planning his 
presidential run for at least 1 years and may 
just be smart enough to pull it off. 

Clinton's political career began m 1979 
when, at age 32, he became the youngest 
governor in the country. He lost the next 
race for governor, but came back m 1982 
and has wtxi every elauon since. Perhaps 
his greatest weakness as governor has been 
his efforts to please everyone. Clinton's 
desire for compromi.se sometimes makes 
him appear to lake both sides of a [wliucal 
issue. For instance, he wimls abortion to be 
"safe, legal, and rare." And chi Uikle issues. 



Clinton is asually antiprolectionist, but has 
said that we should tell the Japanese, "if they 
won'tplay by our rules, we'll play by theirs." 
Such seemingly oppositcs result in critics 
calling him "Slick Willie." 

However, the governor from Arkansas 
seems to be the Democrat with the most to 
offer. He has a well thought out plan for 
changing the current lax stucture that would 
supposedly disinbule the burden more fairly 
and spur more investment. He has prqx)sed 
a change in the current .student loan system 
so that benificianes would be required to 
pay the loan back with community service. 
Clinton also advocates cutbacks in military 
spending that go beyond what Bush has 
proposed, and would cut an additional S 1 (X) 



campaign revolves around a national health 
care plan and every ad displays the line 
"Fight back America." Kerry's personality 
and looks stir memories of JFK, but con- 
vincing voters he's got substance as well as 
charm may be his biggest problem. 

During the Vietnam War Kerry was a 
member of the elite corp known as the Navy 
Seals. It was while leading a seven man 
assult team that a grenade shattered his foot, 
yet he was still able to lead a counterattack 
and get everyone out safely. He now wears 
a prothesis leg, and jogs five miles a day on 
it 

In the early seventies, Kerry got into the 
restaurant business, and now has invest- 
ments in seven restaurants, as well as three 




billion over the next five years. 

ClintOT has prepared well for his bid for 
president. He is his own campaign manager, 
and has thoroughly studied the mi.siakes 
made in past elections. 'You should have 
every negative in your record explored dur- 
ing the primanes," he says, in order to be 
less vulnerable to the negative campaigning 
that will come later. Also, he adds, "people 
want to see how you handle yourself when 
things blow up." Clinton is kx)king forward 
to debating with Bu.sh. pointing to st>me of 
the president's strained rhetoric. (When 
asked aboui extending unemployment ben- 
efits. Bush rcplied,"lf a frog had wings, he 
wouldn'thilhistailoniheground-t(X)hypo- 
Iheiical ") 

Clinton kiiov^s how lo handle his image 
as well as the press, but does that make a 
gcxxl president .' Some say that while Clinton 
has giKxl ideas, he is a p(X>r manager and 
doesn'tcarry things through very well. Oth- 
ers critici/e hini for tailoring his platform 
after carefully pt>lling voters, claiming that 
Clinton will say whatever will get him 
elected In all faimcss though. Clinton has 
been consisiani on issues, and has shown a 
familiarity of the inner workings of politics, 
a trail that is considered essential in the 
While House. 

The Seal of Nehra.ska Senator Bob 
Kerry is mnning a close second behind 
Clinton in the polls at a time when "unde- 
cided" still gets more votes than any of the 
IX^mixrats. He is a war hero, a self-mailc 
hiisini'ssm.in .ukI fomirr I'mi-rnor His 



health clubs. He ran for and won the gover- 
norship of Nebraska in 1982. During his 
term, Kerry managed to turn a $24 million 
dollar deficit into a S5() million dollar sur- 
plus. He dropped out of politics after only 
one term to teach at a college in California, 
but returned two years later and won the 
Senate race. 

Kerry's political career shows many re- 
versals on hot issues. At the start of his 
campaign for governor he said he was anu- 
abortion. but befor it was over he had 
switched to pro-choice. Also, Kerry was 
initially in favor of the amendment against 
flag burning, but soon became one of the 
first to dencxince it To justify his turn 
aa)und on certain issues, Kerry said, "Only 
dead men and fot)ls don' tchange their minds. 
1 am not lixkcd into a position forever, in 
politics, if 1 find out 1 was wrong." 

Kerry's mam campaign issue is his plan 
for health coverage for all Amencans. He 
says it can be funded with a .*>'7f payroll tax. 
arxl that a family earning $40.(X)0 a year 
would save approximately $5(X) annually. 

Kerry doesn't seem to have much else lo 
offer as far as detailed plans are ccxicenwd. 
He says that he will fight against Japan's 
unfair trade practices, but hasn't said how, 
and when asked what he would do to stimu- 
late the economy, Kerry muttered, "I don't 
know " This perception, however, could be 
a result of his running first on his war-hero 
image bcfwc getting to specific plans. Also, 
Kerry shows a disdain for the traditional 
partisan fxiliiics that is refreashing to many 



people and isn't afraid to stand up for what 
he believes, even if it is politically unwise 
(Senator Jesse Helms, his idealogical oppo- 
site, has prai.sed him for this.) Even if he 
does not win the nomination this year. Bob 
Kerry is sure lo become a major force in 
national politics. 

Governor Moonbeam. Often described 
as the "alternative candidate" and running 
the "campaign of a different drummer," 
former two term governor of California Jerry 
Brown is probably the closest this campaign 
has to a populist candidate, at least in the 
way he spurs audiences with his rapid-fire 
rallies. The main theme of his speeches 
have to do with the corruption of "Big 
Money" in polibcs, and he has pledged lo 
accept no more than S1(X) from any one 
contributer. Brown also cuts on the vague 
promises of past campaigns, saying, "You 
know the ads.. .you say 'I hate crime. ..and I 
hate taxes.. .and, oh, 1 love ihe enviroment 
You know those ads ! " B rown too often acts 
in the California fasion and "lets it all hang 
out" as one reporter puts it He has a good 
message in his revival of the American 
political system, but it is too often under- 
mined by his image as a space cadet. 

Tseng and dance. Paul Tsongas, former 
Senator from Massachusetts, is an iniellegent 
man but is terrible on the rhetonc thing. His 
speaches have been described as "bland and 
unexciting." And appearing in one ad wear- 
ing a specdo baihmg sun probably wasn't a 
good idea. Tsongas talks mainly about how 
there needs lo be "fundamental changes" m 
national policy, and says that democrats in 
general need to take a more ];Mt>-business 
stand. He also believes that our economic 
woes are internal, and the mam way to 
reduce ihe trade deficit is to build better 
products. Tsongas has substance, but his 
everyman approach to poliucs just doesn't 
seem to be working. 

In the left corner. Tom Harktn of Iowa 
wants to be known as "the President who 
rebuilt America." He seems to be the most 
liberal of all the candidates, and he claims to 
be "the only real Democrat in the race." He 
has a plan for national health insurance, but 
It's not as specific as the one Kerry is push- 
ing. Harkin does have some important allies 
in the unions, but they complain that he is 
"having trouble moving beyond his iniual 
stump speech." As for the J^janesse, Harkin 
would demand that they reduce their trade 
surplus by 20% a year, or suffer the conse- 
quences. That might sound gocxl to the boys 
from Deu^ioi, but what most people don't 
need is an economic war with Japan. 

K.K.kan't. Coming from way over in 
nght field, David Duke is ndmg on the fame 
of being the only Neo-Nazi in national 
politics. After servmg as a Louisiana Leg- 
islator, he made an unsuccesful bid for the 
Senate, and later the govem«^hip of Loui- 
siana. He IS the founder of the Nauonal 
Asociauon for the Advancement of White 
People, but claims to be more tolerant than 
in days past and says he supports equal 
nghts for all races Duke tnes to portray 
himself as the only true champion of con- 
servative ideals, and attacks Bush for "sell- 
mg exit" to the [)emocrats. As for his chances 
of getting the Republican nonunaucm... yeah, 
nght. 



I 



■■■ 



■■■■ 



warn 



NEWS 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



PC plans variety of events to celebrate Black History Month 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



POLITICS 



Press Release 

OFRCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Although Black History Month does 
not officially begin until February 1, Pres- 
byterian College has already gotten a head 
start on events with a lecture on Thursday, 
January 16, featuring Dr. Jerman Disasa. 

"Black History Month shouldn't be 
looked at simply as the month of February. 
The actual knowledge and teaching of black 
history should go on 365 days a year," said 
Chon Glover, Coordinator of Minority Af- 
fairs. "That's what we 're hoping to achieve 
at Presbyterian College and we hope others 
wiU follow." 

Dr. Disasa, a native African who now 
woiics in the Department of Educational 
Leadership and Policies at the University of 
South Carohna, opened the six week sched- 
ule of Black History Month events at PC 
with his lecture 'Turning Difficulties into 



Opportunities." 

In addition U) Dr. Ei.sasa's leciure,oihcr 
Black History Month events scheduled at 
Presbyterian College are: 

*A look at the origins of African- 
American music at 7 pm on Feb. 2 in Edmunds 
Hall. The guest speaker will be Dr. Horace 
Clarence Boyer, a professor of music theory 
and Afro- American music at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Boyer also 
serves as director of the Vocal Jay7, and Afro- 
American Music Ensemble at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

*A program featuring professional 
orator Dr. Patricia Russell-McCloud, J.D., at 
1 1 am on Feb. 4 in Belk Auditorium. The 
president of Russell-McCloud and Associ- 
ates in Atlanta, and a former senior managing 
attorney for the Federal Communications 
Commission in Washington, Dr. Russell- 
McCloud is noted for her dynamic (telivery 
of research and statistical data in a manner 



that is both entertaining and inlormauvc. 

*A Gospel Extravaganza featuring 
the Presbyterian College Fellowship Choir 
and other choirs from South Carolina col- 
leges and churches at 7 p.m. on Feb. 9 in 
Edmunds Hall. The evening of singing will 
feature two segments of gospel music. 

*Thc college's Black Hisior> Month 
Chapel Service, which is set for 1 1 am on 
February II, will feature Rev. Clinton 
Marsh. Marsh is a former prcsidoni of 
Knoxville College and moderator of the 
United Presbyterian Church m 1973. The 
PresbyicrianColIcgeFellowshipChoirwill 
also perform at the .service. 

*A program at 7 pm on Feb. 23 m 
Edmunds Hall featuring guest speaker Tom 
Jones of Columbia, SC, a nationally-re- 
nowned expert in the field of aliemalivc 
commuter transportation and u-ansporia- 
tion systems management Biographical 
sketches of important blacks will be fea- 



tured. Jones IS the president of Tom Jones 
and Company, a transportation, marketing, 
and personnel consulting fimi in Columbia. 

*The one-woman show "Africa Fire," 
featuring acu-css Vinnic Burrows, will be 
prcscnu-d at 8: 1 5 pm on Feb. 26 in Edmunds 
Hall. Burrows gathers African-American 
literature and history to conceive, pr(xluce, 
direct and pc rform her one - woman shows of 
folk laics and dramatic readings. 

*Thc movie, "A Dry White Sea.son," 
will be shown at 7 pm on Feb. 27 in 
Richardson Science Hall's Whiielaw Audi- 
torium. Set against the background of South 
Africa in 1976, the film examines the dev- 
astauon ol two families - one black and one 
while- as iheyniakeacommitmentioexposc 
the injustices of a minority-ruled country. 

All of the events during PC's Black 
History Month Celebration are free and open 
to the public. F-or more information, call 
833-82S5. 



Open Door founders speak at annual Winter Conference Retreat 



By Paul Atkinson 

NEWS EDITOR 

The annual Winter Conference, which 
began in 1%9 as a way for members of 
different religious organuations to get to- 
gether so that they may better understand 
their similarities rather than their differences, 
was held on January 17-19 at Camp 
Bethelwoods near Rock Hill, SC. The key 
speakers at the retreat. Murphy Davis and 
Ed Loring. founded the Open Door Com- 
munity in Atlanta in 1981. 

Approximately 80 members of the PC 
community attended the conference, in- 
cluding nine of the PC faculty and staff. 

There were several group sessions, 
each designed to discuss topics which fo- 
cused on the theme of service. In addition to 
the study and discussion involved by those 
attending, there were other reu^eat activities, 
such as a bonfire, a hay ride, and an ice 
cream party. 

For the third consecutive year, the 
retreat featured a national recording artist as 
a song leader, as guitarist John Paul Walters 
provided music for the group. 

Davis and Loring are both ordained 
Presbytenan ministers who have committed 
their hves to befriending the homeless of 
Atlanta and inmates on Death Row in the 
Georgia State Prison System. The Open 
Door is a residential Christian community 



for the homeless, established by the couple to 
draw attention to the need for affordable 
housing and human rights. The Open Door 
has become a traditional ouUet for volunteer 
service through Presbyterian College's Stu- 
dent Volunteer Services. 

The theme of service was based on the 
celebration of the 30th year of PC's Student 
Volunteer Services. Dr. Lonng, a 1%3 
graduate of PC and a recipient of the Martin 
Luther King, Sr. Award, emphasized the 
need for passion in our lives. Some who 
attended thought Lonng 's message offen- 
sive. Dr. Ron Bumside explains, 'The 
speakers wanted us to be more aware of the 
world situation. They brought to the confer- 
ence experiences we don't have, and their 
purpose was to stimulate thought. The ap- 
proach taken by Mr. IvOnng was a little 
strong, and it alienated some." 

On the whole, however, most inter- 
preted the expencnce of Winter Conference 
as beneficial. Dr. HobbiebelicvesthatWinier 
Conference was generally a positive experi- 
ence, even though he found offence with 
some of what Dr. Loring said. Dr. Hobbie 
does note, however, that "a challenge is 
sometimes offensive, and you have to get 
beyond that. I worry that some of the people 
who attended the conference were thrown 
off by the speaker's confrontational style. 1 
hope people will not be turned off by style 
and miss the substance." 




Annual Fund phonathon scheduled 



Several P.C. students and Dr. Steven BuKRie gather in front of Camp Bethelwoods 
ChrisUan liklucation Center at Winter ( onference last January. 



Students to visit PC for lock-in 



The phones of PC's alumni soon will 
be ringing with student callers asking for 
support of the college in the annual 
phonathon which will be held from Febru- 
ary 5 through March 4. 

The phonathon secures nearly half of 
the gifts made each year lo the Annual Fund. 
These gifts help provide needed financial 
assistance for students, faculty salanes, and 
current operational needs. 

The phonathon is also important be- 



cause a large number of alumni contnbutions 
attract large gifts from major corporations 
who consider alumni support a condiuon for 
making large gifts. 

Both organizations and individuals will 
have the chance to win cash pri/cs and 
merchandise. In fact, a total of $9(X) in cash 
prizes will be given to organizations. 

Groups interested in participating 
should contact Jim Morton, directtu of the 
Annual Fund, at extention 8325. 



The second annual "Can)lina All- 
Nighter" is planned for February 8 - 9 at 
Presbyterian College and the Clinton Family 
YMCA. Sponsored by South Carolina 
Campus Ministries, the retreat is an 
opporituniiy for senior high schcxil students 
from 22 churches in South Carolina to 
make new friends and become better ac 
quainied with Presbyterian campus minis 
try programs which await them when the 
students go ofl to college. 

Campus chaplains and inicms will be 



present from The Citadel, SC Stale Uni- 
versity, The College of Charleston, Univer- 
sity of South Carolina, Clcmstm University, 
Wmihrop, and 1*C. The theme of this year's 
retreat will be "Celebrate Life." 

The students will participate in small 
group acu vines led by students from the 
seven campu.scs. Oilier activiues include 
workshops on missions, recreational events, 
a creaUve workshop, a dance, and a slide 
show on South CarolinaCampus Ministries. 



Presidential race offers everthing from Nazi to candidate in bikini briefs 



ByTedCarmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

A year ago most people would have said 
the presidenlal race was no contest. Bush 
was expected to glide into office riding on 
his victory in the Persian Gulf. But the real 
world has other ideas, and the counU7 is 
suffering from a recession that it just can't 
shake. In the wake of Bush's drop in popu- 
larity many contenders have popped up, and 
the race is no longer a sure bet. 

In Bush's own party there are two other 
contenders for the nomination: columnist 
Pat Buchanan and former Ku Klux Klan 
Grand Wizard David Duke. As for the 
Democrats, Arkansas' Bill Clinton is the 
current frontrunner, even with the 
unsusiaciated reports of an affair with a 
cabaret singer. Also up for the nomination 
are Nebraska Senator Bob Kerry, former 
California Governor Jerry Brown, Iowa 
Senator Tom Harkm, and the former Sena- 
te from Massachusetts Paul Tsongas. 

Pat's strike from the right. Buchanan 
is sh(x>ting hard for the GOP. nomination 
and attacking Bu.sh for "letting down the 
Amencan public" by going back on his no 
tax pledge. He claims to be true to the 
republican ideal in the spirit of Ronald 
Reagan. He is a conservative vintage 1950's 
and "America first" is his slogan for the '92 
campaign. While his views often ignore 
political correctness, many people find the 
candor refreshing. 

Buchanan loves a good debate, a tt^ait that 
helped him as a columnist, as a speach wnier 
for Nixon and Reagan, and now as a presi- 
dential candidate. Yet many of his state- 
ments cause people to wonder how free of 
prejudice he really is. He has said that AIDS 
is God's punishment for gay ptx)plc, refers 
to the homeless as freeloaders, and suggested 
digging huge trenches lo keep the Mexicans 
out 

Whether Buchanan turns out to be a 
David Duke in sheep's clothing, he is still 
causing problems for the Bush campaign, 
Bush's pcx)ple are publically saying that 
Buchanan may get 40% of the vote in the 
primary, while in private admit that his 
ceiUng is around 2.*^% (This is to make Bush 
l(X)k g(xxl by doing better than expected.) It 
has al.so been reported that Reagan was 
asked to speak on behalf of his former "veep. " 
(He dtx lined.) At any rate, it's not all 
downhill for the education jwesidcnt even 
in his own party 

Best hope for the DemiKrats. Bill 
Clinton has jumped into the fray running 
with his I.Vpage "Clinton Phui." In it, he 
tells his ideas on cvcr>'thing from tax struc- 
ture to defence. He's been planning his 
presidential run for at least 1 years and may 
just be smart enough to pull it off. 

Clinuin'spt)litical career began in 1979 
when, at age .^2, he became the youngest 
govemor in the counu^. He lost the next 
race for govemor, but came back in 1982 
and has won every election since. Perhaps 
his greatest weakness as govemor has been 
his cffiMis to please everyone. Clinton's 
desire for ccxnpromisc sometimes makes 
him appear to take both sides of a pt)liucal 
issue Fw instance, he wants abortion U) be 
"safe, legal, and rare." And on trade issues. 



Clinton is usually antiproiectionist, but has 
said that we should tell the Japanese, "if they 
won'tplay by our rules, we'll play by theirs." 
Such seemingly opposites result in critics 
calling him "Slick Willie." 

However, the govemor from Arkansas 
seems to be the Democrat with the most to 
offer. He has a well thought out plan for 
changing the current tax stucture that would 
supposedly distnbuie the burden more fairly 
and spur more investment. He has proposed 
a change in the current student loan system 
so that benificiaries would be required to 
pay the loan back with community service. 
Clinton also advocates cutbacks in military 
spending that go beyond what Bush has 
proposed, and would cut an additional SI 00 



campaign revolves around a national health 
care plan and every ad displays the line 
"Fight back America." Kerry's personality 
and looks stir memories of JFK, but con- 
vincing voters he's got substance as well as 
charm may be his biggest problem. 

During the Vietnam War Kerry was a 
member of the elite corp known as the Navy 
Seals. It was while leading a seven man 
assult team that a grenade shattered his foot 
yet he was still able lo lead a counterattack 
and get everyone out safely. He now wears 
a prothesis leg, and jogs five miles a day on 
it 

In the early seventies, Kerry got inio the 
restaurant business, and now has invest- 
ments in seven restaurants, as well as three 




billion over the next five years. 

Clmton has prepared well fcx his bid for 
president. He is his own campaign manager, 
and has thoroughly studied the mistakes 
made in past elections. "You should have 
every negative in your record explored dur- 
ing the pri manes," he says, in order to be 
less vulnerable to the negative campaigning 
that will come later. Also, Iw adds, "people 
want to sw how you handle yourself when 
things blow up." Clinton is kx)king fwward 
to debating with Bush, pointing lo some of 
the presuknt's su-ained rhetoric. (When 
a.sked aK>ut extending unemployment ben- 
efits. Bush replied,"lf a frog had wings, he 
wouldn't hit his tail on the ground-t(X) hypo- 
thetical ") 

Clinton knows how to handle his image 
as well as the press, but d(x^s that make a 
gixxl president.' Some say that whileClinion 
has gixxl ideas, he is a ptxir manager and 
dtxjsn'lcarry things through very well. Oth- 
ers cnticize him for tailoring his platfomi 
after carefully polling voters, claiming that 
Clinton will say whatever will get him 
elected. In all fairness though, Clinton has 
been consisiani on issues, and has shown a 
familiarity of the inner wixkings of politics, 
a trait that is considered essential in the 
White House. 

The Seal of Nebraska. SenaU)r Bob 
Kerry is mnning a close second behind 
Clinton m the polls at a ume when "unde- 
cided " still gets more votes than any of the 
IX'mtKrats. He is a war hero, a self-made 
businessman and tomier Bdvemor His 



health clubs. He ran for and won the gover- 
norship of Nebraska in 1982. During his 
term, Kerry managed to turn a S24 million 
dollar deficit into a S50 million dollar sur- 
plus. He dropped out of politics afier only 
one term to teach at a college in California 
but returned two years later and won the 
Senate race. 

Kerry's political career shows many re- 
versals on hot issues. At the start of his 
campaign for govemor he said he was anti- 
abortion, but befor it was over he had 
switched to pro-choice. Also, Kerry was 
initially in favor of the amendment against 
flag burning, but soon became one of the 
first to denounce it To justify his turn 
aniund on certain issues. Kerry said, "Only 
dead men and fix)ls don ' t change their minds. 
1 am not locked into a position forever, in 
politics, if I find out 1 was wrong." 

Kerry's mam campaign issue is his plan 
for health coverage for all Americans. He 
says It can be funded with a 5% payroll lax, 
and that a family earning S40,(X)0 a year 
would save ap^jroximately S500 annually. 

Kerry doesn't seem to have much else to 
offer as far as detailed plans arc concerned. 
He says that he will fight against Japan's 
unfair uade practices, but hasn't said how, 
and when asked what he would do to stimu- 
late the economy, Kerry muttered, "I don't 
know " This perception, however, could be 
a result of his running first on his war-hero 
image before getting to spaific plans. Alst), 
Kerry shows a disdain for the tradiuonal 
partisan politus ihiit is rcfreashing to many 



people and isn't afraid lo stand up for what 
he believes, even if it is politically unwise 
(Senator Jesse Helms, his idealogical oppo- 
site, has [waised him for this.) Even if he 
does not win the nomination this year. Bob 
Kerry is sure to become a major force in 
national politics. 

Govemor Moonbeam. Often described 
as the "alternative candidate" and mnning 
the "campaign of a different drummer," 
former two term govemor of CalifomiaJerry 
Brown is probably the closest this campaign 
has lo a populist candidate, at least in the 
way he spurs audiences with his rapid-fire 
rallies. The main theme of his speaches 
have to do with the corruption of "Big 
Money" in politics, and he has pledged to 
accept no more Uian SlOO from any one 
contributer. Brown also cuts on the vague 
promises of past campaigns, saying, "You 
know the ads., you say '1 hate cnme...and 1 
hate taxes.. .and, oh, I love the enviroment 
You know those ads I" Brown too often acts 
in the Califomia fasion and "lets it all hang 
out" as one reporter puts it. He has a good 
message in his revival of the Amencan 
political system, but it is too often under- 
mined by his image as a space cadet. 

Tsong and dance. Paul Tsongas, former 
Senator from Massachusetts, isan iniellegeni 
man but is temble on the rhetonc thing. His 
speaches have been described as "bland and 
unexcitmg." And appeanng in one ad wear- 
ing a speedo bathing suit probably wasn't a 
good idea. Tsongas talks mainly about how 
there needs to be "fundamental changes" in 
national policy, and says that democrats in 
general need U) lake a more pro-business 
stand. He also believes that our economic 
woes are internal, and the main way to 
reduce the trade deficit is to build better 
products. Tsongas has substance, but his 
everyman approach to pohticsjusi doesn't 
seem to be working. 

In the left comer. Tom Harkin of Iowa 
wants to be known as "the President who 
rebuilt America." He seems to be the most 
liberal of all the candidates, and he claims to 
be "the only real Democrat in the race." He 
has a plan for national health insurance, but 
it's not as specific as the one Kerry is push- 
ing. Harkin does have some important allies 
in the unions, but they complain that he is 
"having U'ouble moving beycxid his initial 
stump spea;h." As for the Japancsse, Harkin 
would demand that they reduce their uade 
surplus by 20% a year, or suffer the conse- 
quences. That might sound good to the boys 
from Deu-iot, but what most people don't 
need is an economic war with Japan. 

K.K.Kan't. Coming from way over in 
nghi field, David Duke is nding on the fame 
of being the only Neo-Nazi in national 
politics. After serving as a Louisiana Leg- 
islator, he made an unsucccsful bid for the 
Senate, and later the governorship of Loui- 
siana. He IS the founder of the Nauonal 
Asociation for the AdvancenKnt of White 
People, but claims to be more tolerant than 
in days past and says he supports tqiak 
rights for all races. Duke tries to portny 
himself as the only true champion of con- 
servauve ideals, and attacks Bush for 'sell- 
ing exit" lo the Democrats AsforhLschjBoes 
of getung the Republican nam inauon... yeah, 
nght. 



I 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



ENVIRONMENT 



ENVIRONMENT 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



MEMBERS OF 
THE PC 

RECYCLING 
BOARD 



Jeff Smith, President of Men's Council 
Jodie Will, President of Women's 

Council 
Margaret BarHeld, SEE 

Representative 
Heather Moncrief, Student 

Representative 
Beixjamin Jones, Student 

Representative 

Mr. Skip Zubrod, V.P. of Finance 
Mr. Jack Robertson, Director of the 

Physical Plant 
Dr. Jerry Slice, Faculty 

Representative 
Mrs. Charlotte Slice, Staff 

Representative 

Student PickUp: Men's Council 
members, Women's Council members, 
and SEE members. 

Any questions concerning the program 
can be directed to any of the board 
members. Anyone interested in volun- 
teering his or her time in assisting with 
the weekly pick up is encouraged to call 
Jeff Smith at ext. 8562. 





Recycling begins on campus 



by Heather Moncrief 

ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 

PC appears to be taking a semi-active 
role in the newly established recycling pro- 
gram. While many have managed to make 
recycling a part of their daily lives, others 
still seem to be overlooking the need to take 
a part in this program. The most accessible 
locations for the can containers were chosen 
in an attempt to make recycling as easy and 
convenient as possible. Yet when the u^sh 
collected at SEE'sLandfill on the Lawn was 
analyzed, it was found to include cans and to 
be, as a whole, 40-45% recyclable. The lack 
of knowledge concerning which items can 
be recycled is one reason for some people's 
lack of participation. As an attempt to assist 
the faculty, staff, and students with this 
problem, a list of acceptable items is found 
below. EvcrycMie should read it carefully 
and take an active role in the campus pro- 
gram. 

As a majority of the landfills in the 
United States reach their maximum capaci- 
ties within the next two to three years, every 
individual will bealfected. Garbage disposat 



cosLs will nse drasucally, and regulations 
limiting items allowed in landfills will be- 
come more stringent. Recycling will be- 
come mandatory in most regions. 

Individuals should begin to establish 
habits that will assist in the overall tfansition 
from a "throw -away society" to a preserving 
society. The Recycling Board hopes to give 
all members of the PC community the means 
to establish such habits. These habits will 
then be carried away from the campus. The 
Board desu-es all to lake advantage of this 
new program which has been established. 



RECYCLE PC PICK-UP TIMES 

Recycle PC pick-ups are scheduled for 
Monday at 3:00 p.m. for the dormitories and 
academic and adminisuation buildings, and 
for Thursday at 3:(K) p.m. for the academic 
and administration buildings. If a problem 
ari.scs and/or the items in your building are 
not picked up, notify Mrs. Charloue Slice at 
ext. 8484. 




RECYCLABLE 

ledger paper: 

typing paper 

brochures 

memos 

junk mail 

notebook paper 

computer paper 

shredded paper 

some magazines (non-slick 
paper) 

envelopes (cut out windows) 

stapled paper (if possible, 
remove staples) 
beverage cans (rin.se with a 

SMALL ainount of water) 
glass 
newsprint (keep separate from 

other paper) 

Students tan deposit pa[K'r in the Uash 
can outside of the mailr(X)m or with 
faculty members who have boxes in their 
offices.) 




CYCLABLE 



plastics 

Styrofoam 

cardboard 

paper clips 

adhesives 

items held together by rubber 

ceinenl 
slick paper (i.e. some magazine 

covers) 



recycle 
today 
for 
tomorrow 



> Drinking and drugs cloud your mind and couso 
risky ciioicoi. 

> Unsofe SOX can IockI to AIDS. 

> Got hoip for a drug or drinking problem. 

> H you hovo soi^ uso condoms. Or cnroid taking 
tlM risk altogotnor. 





EAT IN - ( ARRY OUT ■ DELIVERY 

199 PIZZA SPECIAL! 

Any One 

Me(iium Specialty Pizza 

MMMM M^m j^ ^-». ^-^ Choose From: 

l'yA5» (r> no ■^'-^^a. lovers 

4|l|t ONLYCp.yy ■•;-«» 'overs 
""^*^* ' .Pepperoni Lovers 

.Supreme 

With Purchase Of Another Medium 
Specialty Pizza at Regular Price. 



fpipsl 



Not gcxxl with any other coupon offer or P C discount. 

One coupon per pany per visit at the Clinton Pizza Hut only 

Must present coupon with purchase 



IPir©sIby(l©ii°naiiin 



There is an alternative avail- 
able to the faculty, staff, and 
students who sec the need to avoid 
using polystyrene cups in GDH as 
well as throw-away cups when 
off campus. SEE will be selling 
reusable plastic mugs later this 
month. These granite-colored 
mugs printed in blue and green 
come with lids and unique ben- 
efits. A list of local businesses 
will be printed on the mug; these 
businesses will offer a range of 
discounts from free beverages to 
discounts on refills to discounts at 
such places as Subway on meals. 
As already mentioned, these mugs 
can also be used in GDH in place 
of Styrofoam and papercups. The 
C0S1 is only $3.00. Watch for news 
of their arrival! 



SEE News 



Students for Environmental Education has 
established a ride-share program. Such a 
program could decrease the number of PC 
students driving any distance from the 
campus alone. Sharing the road and the ride 
will lower the amount of pollutants being 
released into the atmosphere and the wastefiJ 
use of oil. A map is located on the buUeun 
board in Springs Campus Center for students 
to mark the locationsof their intended travels. 
A student simply has to write his or her name 
and u^ve! plans on a piece of paper and Slick 
it to the map with a pin. This map offers 
Students planning to u^vel to the same 
destination a means of contacting one an- 
other. For more information, check the map 
in Springs or call Kathryn Spearman at ext 
8785. 




Polystyrene poses health risks 



by Kathryn Spearman 

GUEST WRITER 

Today there is much controversy over 

the human health aspect of chemicals in the 
environment. Unfortunately, most people 
are unaware of the fad that a product a 
mapriiy of Presbyicnan College students, 
facuhy, and staff use daily poses a serious 
health risk. This product is polystyrene, 
which IS marketed under the u-ademark 
Styrofoam by Dow Chemical Company 
Insulation Board. Polystyrene production 
and use exposes human beings to two main 
chemicals that can cause health problems: 
styrcne and benzene. 

Siyrcne is toxic to the bkxKl and to the 
nervous system. It has been proven to ac- 
cumulate in fatly ussue. In the Environmen- 
tal Protection Agency's TRI(Toxic Release 
InvenU)r>) which ranks 302 chemicals on 
the basis of total environmenial release per 
year, styrene ranked twenty -seventh. In 
\%^, styrene releases totaled 43 million 
pounds- second among known or suspected 
carcinogens included on the TRl. A signifi- 
cant portion of the relea.ses were atuiouted 
to polystyrene manufacture. 

llie second chemical, benzene, causes 
immune and repnxlucuve disonlers. NcH 
only is It toxic lo the bkxxl and to bone cells, 
but it is also known k) cause cancer and 
leukemia. Bcn/ene ranks ihuiy-fifih on the 
TRl and is fourth among releases of known 
or suspected carcinogens 

Now that the ingredients of a polysty- 
rene cup have been dest nbcd. how doesone 
filled with coffee or lea affect an individual' 
Studies have shown that things such as fatty 




foods, wine, coffee with cream, and hot 
water will carry stimc amount of styrcne into 
the body. It has also been proven dial some 
individuals have styrene levels of up to 1/3 
of thai proven to cause nerve damage. 

In companson to the extensive reseiBt:h 
done on the effects of dioxm from paper 
manufaciunng, little research has been done 
on the health effects of polystyrene. How- 
ever, studies done thus far prwlict senous 
environmental and health danger from its 
production and its use The fact that the two 
rnapr U)xic chemicals used m plystyrenc 
[H^oducucH) account for some of the lar^st 
releases of all loxic chemicals inio the envi- 
ronment IS evident. Unlike paper produc- 
uon, no new processes are being developed 
lo make polystyrene less of a lw.ard. The 
only way to avoid the toxic chemicals in 
pt)ly styrene is lo avoid polystyrene alto- 
gether. 



FEATURES 



8 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



People Caring How All Brothers And Sisters Inhabit Today and Tomorrow 




By Le Jeanna Maddox 

FEATURES EDITOR 

People Caring How All Brothers And 
Sisters Inhabilat Today And Tomorrow. . . 
That's the motto the members of PC's chap- 
ter of Habitat for Humanity decided upon at 
the beginning of the year to define their role 
on campus and within the Laurens County 
community. 

Within the scope of that purpose, the 



fruition. 

The turnout at recent meetings has been 
eiKouraging to President Laura Smith. She 
explains, "The chapter has had some dis- 
couraging times, but now it is alive and well 
with activity beginning to blossom. This 
reality was only a dream at one time. Such 
vision is atu-ibuted to students and faculty 
such as Mary Ellen Vernon, Greg Henley, 
Meredith Holder, and David Turpin." 

PC sponsors student- led work trips al- 



involved try it once and come away with a 
new appreciation for the real and the simple 
things in life," adds Smith. "One works or 
volunteers intending to give of lime and 
energy but returns filled with so much more 
- the satisfaction of helping someone and 
realizing how interrelated and intcrdepcn- 
dent people are on one another." 

Last year PC helped establish an affi liate 
chapierof Habitat in Laurens Ccxjniy. After 
a year of fundraising, a site has been idcnti- 




courlesy of Le Jeanna Maddox 
Tom Woodward, Ron Hull, Perry Parker, Brandi Rogerson give time and energy to make PC's chapter of Habitat work. 



courtesy of Le Jeanna Maddox 
Tom Woodward hard at work. 



officers of Habitat set two goals for the 
organization this year: to create enthusiasm 
within a stable campuschaptcr and to see the 
ground breaking of the first Laurens County 
house. At last week's meeting to com- 
memorate the second birthday of PC'schap- 
ter, there was more than one reason to cel- 
ebrate, as both goals are slowly coming to 



most every Saturday during the semester to 
sights in Greenwood or Greenville and is 
planning a Spring Break uip to Pensacola, 
Florida. 

Some participants are understandably 
apprehensive about attempting to build a 
hoasc, but they quickly leam that there is 
some son of job for everyone. "Those 



fied in Clinton for the chapter's first house, 
with construction set to begin in Maah. On 
April 25, K' will sponsor a BANDBLAST 
to raise money lor the complciK)n of the 
hoasc and, Habiuit hojx^s, the beginning of 
a second. A numberof bands will Kubnaimg 
their time and Uilcnisat fraternity court, v^ith 
proceeds ge)ing U) the Laurens chapter. 



PC professor offers the experience of China to students 



By Dr. Ron Burnside 

GUEST WRITER 

Presbyterian College 
students will have the op- 
portunity to study in China 
in the fall semester of 1 992 
in a program offered by 
the South Atlantic States 
Ass(xiati()n for Asian and 
African Studies. The pro- 
gram will be based at 
Beijing Foreign Lan- 
guages Normal College, 

A student will earn 
sixteen hours of credit, ten 
of which will be in Chi- 
nese language. In addi- 
tion to the language 
course, the student will 
lake two courses which 
wilt be taught in English. 
China in Perspective is a 
survey course taught by 
Chinese scholars aspects 
of Chinese cultural. So- 
cial Psychology: A Com- 
parison of Chinese and 
Americans will be taught 
by a member of the fac- 
ulty of East Carolina University who 
will serve as resident director of the 
gram. 



,M^-^i^ 



mnii 



I I 




I 

I 

m 
P 



f 



"^^ 



''4*^ 



i 



4 



5 



■S 

^ 




%;'?«^ 




The Great Wall of China 



pholo courtesy of Dr Burnside 



also In addition to course work, there will opportunity to attend theatrical perfor- 

pro be a variety of activities andexcursions in mances, films, and opera, as well as visit 

and around Beijing. Students will have the factories, museums, neighhorhcxxl com- 



mittees, temples, the Great Wall, the Ming 
Tombs, and festival celebrations. 

The cost of the 
H^ program is approxi- 

iHU^ mately $6,720 and in- 

||HhB eludes oricnlation. room, 

l^^^P boaril, tuition, orgaiu/cd 

cultural excursions, 
textbo' t other 

educational iiuiicrials. 
visa fees, and rouiul trip 
airfare. ITie program will 
be comiK'tilive and mu 
dents must submit appli- 
^ - cations by February ^4. 

0_ ^^ »^ Students should have a 
minimum GPA of 2.S, 
demonstrated ability in 
loreign language study, 
and show serious inter- 
est in the study of Chi- 
nese culture. 

Students should con 
tact Dr. Burnside at 
exiention X.VSS or S3.V 
01 H4 fi)r more infomia- 
lion. I-or infi)rmatic)n 
they may alsocontaci one 
of the following students 
who have participated in 
the program: Sally Brady. Michael Mar- 
tin, Ted Carmichael, Chris Adair, and 
l*ri(.c I iniiiuTniaii 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 1992 



ENTERTAINMENT 



( We Love Our Pledges! 



Rebecca Bacock 

Miki Barden 

Mary Beth Bmmbelow 

Tracy Pierre 

Liz Foster 

Erin Fox 

Jennifer Harvey 

Karen Ivey 

Pam Kendall 

Kristi Lett 




Vanessa McAlister 

Karen O'Connor 

U^ Kelsey Oelschlanger 

Shealy Painter 

Lori Randall 

Melynda Ray 

Sally Schafer 

Tracy Todd 

Martha Ann King 

Alison Vaughan 



Lanev Wilkic 

7KTA TATT ALPHA 







F.N. WOLF & CO., INC. 

Investment Bankers 

110 Wall Street 

NY, NY 

Wo .irc a ful-service investment firm, 

expanding and looking for entry-level 

account executives / stock brokers. 

We will be on campus for 

informational meetings in the 

Carolina Union on Tuesday 

February 28th all day. 

Or Contact: 

Sean E. Kilmartin, Branch Manager 

RN. Wolf &Co. 

5400 Glenvvood Ave. 

Suite 215 
Raleigh, NC 27612 

1-800-537 2190 919-781-1151 

Member: NASD SIPC 



Winter Formal to be 'big success' 



By Amanda Bowers 

STAFF WRITER 

Saturday, Febniary 8, the Springs Cam- 
pus Center will come to life with the sounds 
of the Groove Krew and B. S. & M. Both 
bands will be playing at this year's Winter 
Formal. This is the third year the Student 
Union Board (SUB) has sponsored a formal 
for PC students. According to SUB Secre- 
tary Jessica Ray, the dance is becoming a 
tradition because, "there were a lot of re- 
quests for a formal that the entire student 
body can attend without being a member of 
an organization." 

The Winter Formal is actually a semi- 
formal with a black ue option. The colors 
this year are red, black and silver. The bands 
will be playmg on the second floor of Springs, 



downstairs light hers d'oeuvres, catered by 
the Inn on the Square, will be served. The 
bands will be playing from 9:00 pm to 1 :00 
am. Although the formal is sponsored by 
SUB, several other organizations contribute 
to its plannmg and success. The six frater- 
nities, Baptist Student Union, Minority Stu- 
dent Union and the Men's Council have 
been selling uckets. The sororiues will be 
decorating the gym on Saturday morning. 
According to Ray, "SUB is expecting the 
formal to be a big success." She also com- 
mented that, "the bands are great, and play a 
variety of music everyone will enjoy." 

Tickets for the Winter Formal will be on 
sale in Springs until 5:00 pm Friday, Febru- 
ary 7. They are $8.00 each or $14.00 per 
couple. 



SEMESTER CALENDAR 



February 

8 

15-16 

19 



21 

25 

March 

9-13 
16 
20 
27 

30 

April 

10 
16 

17&20 
21 

23-25 

24 
29 

30 

Mav 

1.2,4&5 



SUB Wmier Formal 

P. C. Choir "Broadway Cabaret 

Arnold Symposium: Edward Said 

(Palestine/Islam/media/joumalism) 

' f ' penod will not meet 

SUB Movie "New Jack City" 

Class make-up day from 19th 



9:00 p.m. 

8:15 p.m. 

11:00 a.m. 



7:00 p.m. 
11:00 a.m. 



Spring Break 

Last day to drop courses "\\T " 

SUB Movie "Decieved" 7:00 p.m. 

Battle of the Sexes 2:00 p.m. 

SUB Spnng Swing Concert 8:00 p.m. 

Summer/Fall 1992 pre-registrauon begins 

Special Olympics 

Summer/Fall 1992 pre -registration ends 

Easier Holiday 

Honors Day 11:00 a.m. 

Play- "You're a Good Man Charlie 7:30 p.m. 

Brown" 

SUB Movie 'Cape Fear" 7:00 p.m. 

Reading Day 

Commencement Pracuce for Seniors 4:00 p.m. 

Final Exams begin 



Final Exams 



National Players presents "Twelfth Night" 



By Angle Richardson 
ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

On January 15. the National Players of 
Washington. D. C. prcsenteil Shakespeare's 
'Twelfth Night" in Belk Audiumum, The 
play wasonginally set in Elizabethan times, 
but this presentation was transported to the 
early 192()'s. The music and costumes re- 
flected the colorful, so nu mental spml of the 
times. 

Separated dunng a shipwreck, twins 
Viola and Sebastian each think the other is 
dead. Disguised as a page (Ccsano), Viola 
goes to work lor Duke Orsmo. She is sent to 
tell Countess Olivia of The Duke's love for 
her. Olivia falls in love withCesano, instead 
of Orsmo The situation is complicated 



further when Viola falls in love with Orsino. 
The end of the play reunites Viola and 
Seba-siian, idcntiues are revealed, and the 
characters find love and happiness. 

The Utle "Twelfth Night" refers to tfic 
fesuval on the twelfth day after Christmas 
when each house hokl chose a member of the 
family to be king for a day. The play was 
written and named fw the Twelfth Night 
celcbrauon in Elizabeth's court in 1601. 
The title shows no rclauonship to the plcM, 
though the fun-loving spini of the festival is 
capbired in the play 

This prcscntatKW of the play marked the 
eighth prcscntaiuxi of the play in 42 years of 
tounng by the National Players. This is 
e^^ualled only by eight prcscniaions by the 
company of "Much Ado About Nothing." 



■■■■ 



■■■i 



SPORTS 



10 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



New year for women's basketball 



by Shara Garwood 

STAFF WRITER 

The PC Women's Basketball team 
started out 1 992 with five solid wins against 
Gardner-Webb, Lenoir-Rhyne, Catawba, 
Elon, and Limestone. Melanie Johnson 
was honored by being named player of the 
week for a second time for the first week 
after Christmas. Also, three of the Lady 
Blue Hose are averaging in the double fig- 
ures. Melanie Jc^nson leads the team with 
an average of 1 4 points, followed by Jennifer 
Milliard with 13.4, and Amber Forester 
with 11.4 points. 

The ladies lost their next three games 
against Wingate, Carson-Newman, and 
Mars Hill on January 15th, 18th, and 22nd. 
The team regrouped, though, and on Sat- 
urday , January 25th, they beat Lenoir-Rhyne 
97-82 in overtime. KayeWatLs and Melanie 
Johnson were the leading scorers in this 
game with 22 points each. Coach Couture 
says this was an exciting and big win for the 



team. Wofford was the next team to fall to 
the Lady Blue Hose, 82-60, on Monday, 
January 27th. This was an important win for 
the women because they were beaten by the 
Terriers before Christmas. PC lost a close 
game against Erskinc 65-69 on January 28 
but bounced back on February 1st to beat 
Gardner- Webb at home 78-69. 

The PC Ladies have a record of 14-5 and 
will finish the sca.son with a winning record 
even ifthey fail to winanother regular season 
game. They are second behind Carson- 
Newman in the South Atlantic Conference 
with a record of 6-3 and Coach Beth Couture 
says they are real excited to be at #2. The top 
three teams in the conference will move into 
the District Playoffs at the end of February. 
The next games are ai Lander, Catawba, and 
Elon, then on the 10 and 12ih PC will play 
their last two home games of the season 
against Mars Hill and Wingate respectively. 

The SAC tournament, to be held in Boil- 
ing Springs, North Carolina, will be the 20 
through the 22 of February. The District 26 
Playoffs will begin on the 25 of February. 




Cat£ 


opponent 


Score 


W/L LeadlDB Scorer/Rebounderii 


11/23 


at Col. of Charleston 


65-64 


w 


Forreslcr (17)/ Hubbard ( 1 3) 


11/24 


at Coastal Carolina 


79-65 


w 


Johnson (20) / Trammell (7) 


11/26 


Converse 


90-54 


w 


Johnson (21) /Hubbard (11) 


12/4 


@ Newberry 


86-50 


w 


Johnson (17) /Hiliiard (11) 


12/5 


(5) Wofford 


72-73 


L 


Forrester (26) / 


12/10 


Newberry 


94^8 


w 


Hiliiaid(21)/HiUiard(6) 


12/14 


Lander 


77-72 


w 


Johnson (26) /Hubbard (4) 


1/4 


atGardner-Webb* 


70-66 


w 


Forresia (18) / Forrester (6) 


1/6 


Lenoir-Rhyne* 


89-69 


w 


Hiniard(22)/Hjlliard(8) 


1/8 


Catawba* 


65-58 


w 


Hiliiard (17) /Johnson (11) 


1/11 


Elon* 


63-56 


w 


Johnson (14) /Bailey (8) 


1/13 


Limestone 


88-65 


w 


Forrester (19) /Hiliiard (8) 


1/15 


at Wingate* 


57-61 


L 


Jenkins (13) /Hiiiiard (8) 


1/18 


Carson-Newman* 


49-70 


L 


Watts(12)/Lockwood(8) 


1/22 


at Mars Hill* 


73-79 


L 


Hiliiard (16) /Jenkins (10) 


1/25 


at Lenoir-Rhyne 


97-82(ODW 


Walts and Johnson (22) / Three w(7) 


1/27 


Wofford 


82-60 


W 


Watts (19) /Johnson (8) 


1/28 


at Erskinc 


65-«9 


L 


Watts(17)/Wiihams(7) 






@)-Little Four Tournament, Due West 






•"South Atlantic Conference hame 






HOME 


GAMES IN BOLD 



P.C. girls play hard at a home basketball game. 



v^ 



Men's basketball team has their home winning streak broken 



By Everett Catts 
STAFF WRITER 

The 1991-92 Men's Ba.skelball Team 
has a 10-8 record and they are 5-2 in the 
SAC-8. PC is ranked third in the confer- 
ence behind Lenoir- Rhyne and Gardner- 
Webb. 

In the Aloha Invitational Tournament 
in Hawaii on December 29-30. the Blue 
Hose lost to Western Kentucky University, 
82-64 despite being down by seven points 
with only 3:44 left in the game. Western 
Kentucky went on to beat N.C. State in the 
tournament finals, while PC played 
Chammade of Hawaii. Even though the 
Blue Hose had a three point lead with only 
Five minutes left in the game, they lost to 
Chammade, 89-79. 

Despite the loss, PC Coach Greg Nibert 
said he was proud of the team. "1 was 
exu^emelyproudof how we played. We left 
Hawaii with the confindence of playing 
two talented teams." 

In the week of January 5-12, the Blue 
Hose went 3-0. with wms over Limestone 
and SAC-8 rivals Catawba and Elon. For 
his excellent play. Derrick Lovelace was 
named SAC-8 Co-Player of the Week. 
Lovelace averaged 16.3 points per game in 
the three PC wins. 

On January 1 3, the Blue Hose suffered 



their first SAC-8 los.s againstGardner- Webb, 
5249. Two days later, PC bounced back 
with a 65-61 win at Wingate. Bret Jones led 
the team with a 19 points and 9 rebounds in 
the game. 

On January 1 8, the Blue Hose defeated 
Carson-Newman, 59-54. The game's high- 
light came when Mike Camacho hit a long 
3-pointcr with less than 30 seconds to go and 
notimeleftontheshotclock. The3-pointer 
gave the Blue Hose a five point lead, clinch- 
ing the victory. 

On January 20, PC lost in overtime to 
Wofford, 62-53. The loss was the Blue 
Hose's first at home in almost a year. Dating 
back to February 1991, the Blue Hose had 
won eight straight at home. Coach Nibert 
said that one of the reas(ms for the winning 
streak is the student support of the home 
games. 

In other game action. PC won on the 
road against Mars Hill, 70-54. On January 
25, the squad lost to Lenoir Rhyne, 88-77. 

"I feel good about our record" said 
Nibert. "We need to play better offensively, 
and we need to take better shots and take 
bciicr care of the basketball if we arc going 
to win." 

The Blue Hose played Newberry last 
night and play at home tomorrow against 
Gardner-Webb. 



r 



Remaining Men's 1992 Basketball Schedule 



February 



March 



8 


Elon 


Away 


7:30 


12 


Wingate* 


Home 


7:30 


15 


Carson-Newman 


Away 


7:30 


17 


Newberry 


Home 


7:30 


19 


Mars lliir 


Nome 


7:30 


22 


Lenoir-Rhyne* 


Home 


7:30 


27-29 


Food Lion SAC Toumamcnt 




7-11 


District 26 Toumamcnt 








* Denotes South Atlantic Confercntt 


; game 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



11 



SPORTS 



Couture takes PC athletics to 'new frontier* 



By Brad Busbee 
ST AFT WRITER 

When Beth Couture came to PC five 
vcars ago, women's basketball and volley- 
ball had "on and off seasons. Now, PC is 
reaching new frontiers in women's athlet- 
ics. Coach Beth Couture has given PC 
winning teams and a great deal more. 

One rca.son lor her amazing success is 
that she truly loves what she does. More 
than anything, she .seems to love seeing her 
students grow and learn She loves seeing 
her players develop and come together as a 
team. 

1 1 excites me when I see that what I have 
done makes a difference in my player's 
f unikimentals and iheir talents," pointed out 
Couture. 

Senior Shannon Carter has played un- 
der Coach Couture throughout high school 
and college. Carter says that Coach Couture 
uses her straight forward energetic nature to 
help the team reach their goals. 

Senior basketball player Amber 
Forrester added, "Very rarely does Coach 
Couture give big pressure speeches to mou- 
vaic us. She just expects us to tow lix' line." 

Couture has no problem motivating her 
players because she is so highly self-mou- 
vaied. "Thmgs do gel tough, espaially 
when the two spoas 1 coach begin to overlap 
each other. It just seems dial whenever we 
siari pa'parauon for the next game, I ju.st 
can't help but meet the challenge. The 




Beth Couture instructs her team during a time out. 



photo courtesy cfPaC SaC 



challenge of it all gets me going again," 
Couture said. 

Beth Couture has definitely taken on 
.some challenges since she has been at PC. 
In 1990 Couture led her volleyball team to 
their first national U)umameni which was 
held in Hawaii. This pmi .season the Lady 
Hose made another appearance at the tour- 



nament. In her five years as the volleyball 
coach she has received District Six Coach of 
the Year honors four times. 

Things really started coming together 
for Beth Couture in 1990. She took over as 
head coach of the '89-'90 Lady Blue Hose 
Basketball team. The Lady Hose ended 
with a 20- 10 record. It was the ftfst time the 



ATTFNTION (JRADl ATING SENIORS 

The on-campus recruiting schedule is listed below. Please be aware that additions or cancellations 
occur regularly andil is imponant that you keep in close touch with the calendar of 

recruiters located in the Placement Office. 

February 1 1 South Carolina National Bank (bank management trainees) 

Februiuy 13 - C&S Sovran (Bank management trainees) 

February 20 - Walmart Stores (retail management) 

February 25 - F.N. Wolf & Co. (investment banking/brokerage) 

February 26 - The Prudential Insurance Co. (Sales/service. Interested in 

residents of lower SC area from Columbia to Charleston.) 
February 27 - Georgia State Merit System (all state agencies) 
February 27 - Milliken (production management) 
Maah 3 - EDUCATION CAREER DAY (teacher candidates only) 
April 2 - Premier Industrial Corporation (industrial sales) 
We are working with several other companies and agencies and hope to add them to the schedule 
as soon as they iK able to schedule a mutually convenient time. 
Please call or come by our office, 215 Douglas House, if we can help in any way. 



women's basketball team had ever won 20 
games in a season. They also competed in 
their fist district tournament ever. She sees 
these events as the "first two milestones of 
her career," but insists that the hard woric of 
her players has been insu^mental in the 
success of all of her teams. 

She believes she has found what she 
was meant to do. "I feel lucky to be able to 
dowhaildo. Everyday is a new adventure," 
said CouUire. 

Her coaching style has a great deal to do 
with how the players relate and learn from 
each other. "CoachCouiure seems to recruit 
the greatest players. The girls she recruits fit 
in well with the rest of us and usually be- 
come great friends of ours," pomted out 
Carter. 

Couture goes after the recruits that are 
pursued by the bigger schools like USC and 
Clemson and keeps after them even when 
most of the small schools have given up. "I 
refuse to shy away from the good recruits 
because they seem big school bound. 1 think 
it's important to get good young athletes so 
they can challenge my older more experi- 
enced players for their positions and make 
them better," stated Couture. Couture al.so 
plays her younger players so they will be 
more capable when their time to lead. 

Whatever it is that makes Coach Beth 
Couture so very successful , it seems to 
come naturally for her. Her chansma, her 
positive attitude about 1 ife , and her competi- 
tive nature make her a success. 



The Community Concert 
Association presents 



CRESCENT 

CITV JflZZ 
BRND 



February 22, 1992 

7:30 pm 

Belk Auditorium 

Students admitted free with 

P.C. I.D. 




> Unsof* s«x can l«acl to 
AIDS. 

> 6«f help for o drvg or 
drinking problem. 

> H yow have sex, use a 
condom. Or avoid tak- 
ing the risk altogether. 



fiOiitetesiEi 



jHL' I'Ouy'wu'n y^ 



SPORTS 



10 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



New year for women's basketball 



by Shara Garwood 
STAFF WRITER 

The PC Women's Basketball team 
started out 1992 with five solid wins against 
Gardner-Webb, Lenoir-Rhyne, Catawba, 
Elon, and Limestone. Melanie Johnson 
was honored by being named player of the 
week for a second time for the first week 
after Christmas. Also, three of the Lady 
Blue Hose are averaging in the double fig- 
ures. Melanie Johnson leads the team with 
an average of 1 4 points, followed by Jennifer 
Milliard with 13.4, and Amber Forester 
with 11.4 points. 

The ladies lost their next three games 
against Wingate, Carson-Newman, and 
Mars Hill on January 15th, 18th, and 22nd. 
The team regrouped, though, and on Sat- 
urday, January 25th.thcy beat Lenoir-Rhyne 
97-82 in overtime. Kaye Watts and Melanie 
Johnson were the leading scorers in this 
game with 22 points each. Coach Couture 
says this was an exciting and big win for the 



team. Wofford was the next team to fall to 
the Lady Blue Hose, 82-60, on Monday, 
January 27th. This was an important win for 
the women because they were beaten by the 
Terriers before Christmas. PC lost a close 
game against Erskine 65-69 on January 28 
but bounced back on February 1st to beat 
Gardner- Webb at home 78-69. 

ThePCL^ieshavca recordof 14-5 and 
will finish the season with a winning record 
even if they fail to win another regular season 
game. They are second behind Carson- 
Newman in the South Atlantic Conference 
with a record of 6-3 and Coach Beth Couture 
says they are real excited to be at #2. The top 
three teams in the conference will move into 
the Disuict Playoffs at the end of February. 
The next games are at Lander, Catawba, and 
Elon, then on the 10 and 12th PC will play 
their last two home games of the season 
again.si Mars Hill and Wingate respectively. 

The SAC tournament, to be held in Boil- 
ing Springs, North Carolina, will be the 20 
through the 22 of February. The Disu-ici 26 
Playoffs will begin on the 25 of February. 



>i 




Dili 


opponent 


Score 


W/L LeadiDE Scorer/Rebounder^ 


11/23 


al Col. of Charleston 


65-64 


w 


Forrester (17) /Hubbard (13) 


11/24 


at Coastal Carolina 


79-65 


w 


Johnson (20) /Trammell (7) 


11/26 


Converse 


90-54 


W 


Johnson (21)/ Hubbard (11) 


12/4 


@ Newberry 


86-50 


w 


Johnson (17) /Hilliard (11) 


12/5 


@ Wofford 


72-73 


L 


Forrester (26)/ 


12/10 


Newberry 


9448 


W 


HiUiard (21) /Hilliard (6) 


12/14 


Lander 


77-72 


W 


Johnson (26) /Hubbard (4) 


1/4 


at Gardner- Webb* 


70-66 


W 


Forrester (18)/ Forrester (6) 


1/6 


Lenoir-Rhyne* 


89-69 


w 


Hilliard (22) /Hilliard (8) 


1/8 


Catawba* 


65-58 


w 


Hilliard (17) /Johnson (11) 


1/11 


Elon* 


63-56 


w 


John.son(14)/Bai!cy(8) 


1/13 


Limestone 


88-65 


w 


Forrester (19) /Hilliard (8) 


1/15 


at Wingate* 


57-61 


L 


Jenkins (13) /Hilliard (8) 


1/18 


Carson-Newman* 


49-70 


L 


Watts(12)/Lockwood(8) 


1/22 


at Mars Hill* 


73-79 


L 


Hilliard (16) /Jenkins (10) 


1/25 


at Lenoir-Rhyne 


97-82(ODW 


Watts and Johnson (22) /Three w(7) 


1/27 


Wofford 


82-60 


W 


Watts(19)/John.son(8) 


1/28 


at Erskinc 


65-69 


L 


Watts (17) /Williams (7) 






@>-Little Four Tournament, Due West 






♦"Sou 


h Atlantic Conference hame 






HOME GAMES IN BOLD 



P.C. girls play hard at a home basketball game. 



' \ 



Men's basketball team has their home winning streak broken 



By Everett Catts 

STAFF WRITER 

The 1991-92 Men's Basketball Team 
has a 10-8 record and they are 5-2 in the 
SAC-8. PC is ranked third in the confer- 
ence behind Lenoir- Rhyne and Gardner- 
Webb. 

In the Aloha Invitational Tournament 
in Hawaii on December 29-30, the Blue 
Hose lost to Western Kentucky University, 
82-64 despite being down by seven points 
with oily 3:44 left in the game. Western 
Kentucky went on to beat N.C. State in the 
tournament finals, while PC played 
Chaminade of Hawaii. Even though the 
Blue Hose had a three point lead with only 
five minutes left in the game, they lost to 
Chaminade, 89-79. 

Despite the loss, PC Coach Greg Niberi 
said he was proud of the team. "I was 
extremely proud of how we played. We left 
Hawaii with the confindence of playing 
two talented teams." 

In the week of January 5- 1 2, the Blue 
Hose went 3-0, with wins over Limestone 
and SAC-8 rivals Catawba and Elon. For 
his excellent play, Derrick Lovelace was 
named SAC-8 Co-Player of the Week. 
Lovelace averaged 16.3 points per game in 
the three PC wins. 

On January 1 3, the Blue Hose suffered 



their first SAC-8 loss againstGardner- Webb, 
5249. Two days later, PC btiunced back 
with a 65-61 win at Wingate. Bret Jones led 
the le^m with a 19 points and 9 rebounds in 
the game. 

On January 1 8, the Blue Hose defeated 
Carson-Newman, 59-54. The game's high- 
light came when Mike Camacho hit a long 
3-poinier with less than 30 seconds to go and 
no time left on the shot clock. The 3-pointcr 
gave the Blue Hose a five point lead, clinch- 
ing (he victory. 

On January 20, PC lost in overtime to 
Wofford, 62-53. The loss wa.s the Blue 
Hose's first at home in almost a year. Dating 
back to February 1991, the Blue Hose had 
won eight straight at home. Coach Nibert 
said that one of the reasons for the winning 
streak is the student support of the home 
games. 

In other game action. PC won on the 
road against Mars Hill, 70-54. On January 
25, the squad lost to Lenoir Rhyne, 88-77. 

"1 feel go(xl about our record" said 
Nihert. "We need to play better offensively, 
and we need to take better shots and take 
better care of the basketball if we arc going 
to win." 

The Blue Hose played Newberry last 
night and play at home tomorrow against 
Gardner-Webb. 



r 



Remaining Men's J992 Basketball Schedule 



February 



March 



8 


Elon 


Away 


7:30 


12 


Wingate* 


Home 


7:30 


15 


Carstxi-Newman 


Away 


7:30 


17 


Newberry 


Home 


7:30 


19 


Mars Hill* 


Home 


7:. 30 


22 


Lenoir-Rhyne* 


Home 


7:30 


27-29 


Food Lion SAC Toumamcnt 




7-11 


District 26 Tournament 








• Denotes South Atlantic Conference 


game 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



11 



SPORTS 



Couture takes PC athletics to 'new frontier* 



By Brad Busbee 

STAhT WRITER 

When Beth Couture came to PC five 
u-ars ago, women's basketball and volley- 
hall had "on and off sca.sons. Now, PC is 
reaching new frontiers in women's athlet- 
ics. Coach Beth Couture has given PC 
winnmg teams and a great deal more. 

One reason for her ama/ing success is 
ihai she u-yiy loves what she does. More 
ih:in anything, she seems to love seeing her 
siudonLs grow and Icam She loves seeing 
her players develop and come together as a 
team. 

"Ii excites me when I see that what I have 
done makes a difference in my player's 
fundimcntals and their talcnt-s," pointed out 
Couture. 

Senior Shannon Carter has played un- 
der Coach Couture throughout high school 
and ct)llcgc. Carter says that Coach Couture 
uses her straight fcxward energetic nature to 
help ihc team reach their goals. 

Senior basketball player Amber 
Forrester added "Very rarely docs Coach 
Couture give big pressure speeches to moti- 
vate us. She jusiexpecLs us to low the line." 

Couture has no problem motivaung her 
players because she is so highly self-moti- 
vated. "Things do gel lough, especially 
when the two s\)ons I coach begin looverbp 
each other. It just seems thai whenever we 
siiul pa'parauon for the next game, 1 just 
can't help but meet the challenge. The 




Beth Couture instructs her team during a time out. 



pholo courtesy ofPaC SaC 



challenge of il all gels me going again," 
Couture said. 

Beth Couture has definitely taken on 
some challenges since she has been at PC. 
In 1990 Couture led her volleyball team to 
thcu- first national U)umamcnt which was 
held in Hawaii. This pasl season the Lady 
Hose made another appearance at the tour- 



nament. In her five years as the volleyball 
coach she has received District Six Coach of 
the Year honors four times. 

Things really started coming together 
for Beth Couture in 1 990. She took over as 
head coach of the '89-'9() Udy Blue Hose 
Basketball team. The L^y Hose ended 
w iih a 20- 1 record . 1 1 was the first time the 



ATTFNTION ERADIATING SENIORS 

The on-campus recruiting schedule is listed below. Please be aware that additions or cancellations 
occur regularly andil is inipt)rtant that you keep in close touch with the calendar of 

recruiters kxated in the Placement Office. 

Febn'vy 1 1 South Carolina National Bank (bank management trainees) 

February 13 - C&S Sovran {Bank management trainees) 

February 20 - Walmart Stores (retail management) 

February 25 - F.N. Wolf & Co. (investment banking/brokerage) 

February 26 - The Prudential Insurance Co. (Sales/service. Interested in 

residents of lower SC area from Columbia to Charleston.) 
February 27 - (Jeorgia State Merit System (all state agencies) 
February 27 - Miliiken (production management) 
March 3 - EDUC^ATION CAREER DAY (teacher candidates only) 
Apnl 2 - Premier Industrial Corporation (industrial sales) 
We are working with several other companies and agencies and hope to add them to the schedule 
as soon as they are able to schedule a mutually convenient time. 
Please call or cotne by our office, 2 1 5 Douglas House, if we can help in any way. 



The Community Concert 
Asscxiaiion presents 



CRESCENT 

CITV JflZZ 
BRND 



February 22, 1992 

7:30 pm 

Belk Auditorium 

Students admitted free with 

P.C. I.D. 



women's ba.sketball team had ever won 20 
games in a season. They also competed in 
their fist district tournament ever. She sees 
these events as the "first two milestones of 
her career," but insists that the hard work of 
her players has t)een insuiimental in the 
success of all of her teams. 

She believes she has found what she 
was meant to do. "I feel lucky to be able to 
do what 1 do. Every day isa new adventure," 
said Couuire. 

Her coaching style has a great deal to do 
with how the players relate and learn from 
e^h other. "Coach Couture seems to recruit 
the greatest players. The girls she recruits fit 
in well with the rest of us and usually be- 
come great friends of ours," pointed out 
Carter. 

Couture goes after the recruits that are 
pursued by the bigger .schools like USC and 
Clemst)n and keeps after them even when 
most of the small schools have given up. "I 
refuse to shy away from the gcxxl recniits 
because they seem big schtx)l bound. 1 think 
it's important to get good young athletes so 
they can challenge my older more experi- 
enced players for their positions and make 
them better," staled Couture. Couture also 
plays her younger players so they will be 
more capable when their time to lead. 

Whatever it is that makes Coach Beth 
Couture so very successful , it seems to 
come naturally for her. Her chansma, her 
posiu ve atutude about life, and her competi- 
tive nature make her a success. 




> Unsof* »m* con I*cnI to 
AIDS. 

> Get help for a drug or 
drinking problem. 

> if yew have sex, use o 
condom. Or ovoid fok- 
ing the risk oltogoHior. 




CAMPUS & CLUBS 



12 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992 



Haynie helps college Fill the Gapp' 



Press Release 

Office of Public Relations 

Asaiwmberofthe Solid Waste Man- 
agement sub-committee, itis Bob Haynic's 
job to be concerned about how we dispose 
of our solid waste. Haynie spoke on Tues- 
day , January 20. at Presbyteriaii College to 
share his information mih students as they 
attempt to fully grasp 'Jie problem of waste 
management, the possible solutions 
available, and the role that individual 
communities can play in those solutions. 

Haynie, who serves as Greenwood 
County manager, was influential in the 
development of the Sobd Waste Manage- 
ment Act, which was adopted by the South 
Carolina General Assembly last May. The 
Act is a comprehensive law which encom- 
passes the next six years, with the first 
actual evaluation of efficiency scheduled 
for 19%. 

The plan's primary goal is to recycle 
25 percent of the waste sueam and to 
reduce the volume of the waste su^eam by 
30 percent. A major barrier is the public's 
lack of knowledge about how to recycle, 
what to recycle, and what to expect from 



recycling. 

Haynie said Greenwood County has 
already introduced the initial stages of the 
act ar.d, in an effort to fight the lack of 
education, has created a "Fill the GAPP" 
promotion. GAPP (Glass, Aluminum, Pa- 
pCT, Plastic) containers are placed in each 
home and families are encouraged to re- 
cycle those products. The "GAPP-Man" 
appears on nationwide cable television 
systems such as CNN, ESPN, and US A to 
remind people to recycle and to provide 
tips and information about the project. 

Haynie' s appearance was sponsored 
by the Presbyterian College Recycling 
Board, which was formed last year. This 
semester, students and adminisuators at 
the college have an opportunity to become 
part of the solution through a new recy- 
cling program. Recycling boxes have bojn 
placed in administrative offices to collect 
paper goods, while recycling bins for alu- 
minum can have been placed in dormito- 
ries. 

Also planned are recycling demon- 
strations and information which will help 
educate the entire Laurens County com- 
munity. 



Out Of Africa will be shown on RC. 
channel 33 at 9:30 pxn on Februar)^ 3, 4, 7, 
10, 12, 14. This was mostly filmed 'r. 
Kenya and includes many scenes (includ- 
ing the same train ride) that you will see on 
the MAY AFRICA FLEXICOURSE. This 
course gives you 3 hours elective biology 
credit and is open to all students, any 
major. See Dr. Hudson or Dr. James for 
details. 



The Episcopal Churcn Especially Welcomes Students 
+ ALL SAINTS' EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
One Block North of Greenville Dining Hall 
Sunday Schedulg 

8.30 im Holy Eucharist 
9.45 im Chriitim Edjcinon 
10.30 m Coffee (in Pifish Hall) 

ILOO am Holy Eucharist 
6.00 pm * CAHTERBVRy — tor College Students 
• Need someone to talk to? 

The Rev. Nancy J Allison, Rector (833-1388) 

The Rev Unnan Pea/ion, Pntsion-Campus (833-8295) 



Alpha Delta Pi 

Alpha Delta Pi had a successful RUSH! 
Congralulaiions toour new girls: Lisa Bruce, 
Kathcrine Bonner, Natasha Casada, Avery 
Cheves, Ann Dodd, Elizabeth Gilbert, Holly 
Harper, Jennifer H;*:! is, Yjiic Hartman, Leigh 
Hcamburg, Catherine H«xlges, Alice Leach, 
Ashby Lawton, K;.whryn Massey, Kelly 
Reiser, Kathcrine Rh:iiT)c, Jennifer Roach, 
Katy Ross, Ashley Small, Jennifer Tanner, 
and A.shley Williams. This weekend we 
will travel to Lake Rabon for a Sisterhood 
Retreat! Congrats to Sigma and Zcta on 
their rash also! 

SAIVl 

SAM had its first meeting on Monday, 
January 27. Len Grions, from Cilb.ens Trust 
Corporation, spoke about insurance at the 
meeting. SAM is sponsoring a contest to 
design an ad for Terry 's Restaurant to be put 
in the Blue Stocking. The prize is $50. Look 
for signs about the contest around campus or 
contact George Rea for more details. The 
dales for our next meetings arc February 10, 
FcbruuT) 24, and March 23. 

ZTA 

Zcta Tau Alpha would like to welcome 
our new pledges; Rebecca Babcock, Miki 
Bardcn, M.oy Beth Brumbclow, Liz Foster, 
Erin Fox, Jennifer Harvey, Karen Ivey, Pam 
Kendall, Krisii Lett, Martha Ann King, 
Vanes.sa McAllister, Karen O'Connor. 
Kelsey Oel.schlagcr. Shealy Painter, Tracy 
Picrro, ijon Randall, Melynda Ray, Sally 
Schafcr. Tiacy Todd, Alison Vaughan, and 
Lancy Wilkic. W-^ had a wondcrtui Bid 
Day. We went ice-skaiing in Greenville and 
spent the night at the First Presbyterian 
Church. We're lcx)king forward to a great 
semester. ZTA pledges are tough! We love 
you! 



Sigma Nu 

The brothers and pledges of Sigma Nu 
hope that everyone had a great time during 
rush. We wish everyone luck on their deci- 
sions. Thanks to all the Little Sisters and 
Rush Giris that contributed to another suc- 
cessful Rush sca.son. We're looking for- 
ward to an eventful Spring semester, packed 
with road trips and theme parties. Again, we 
hope that Rush was a good experience for 
everyone, and thanks to all the rushees for a 
great turnout. 

Intramural News 

The intramural department would like to 
congratulate the winners of the Schick 3 on 
3 ba.skctball tournament here at Presbyte- 
rian College. The winning women's team 
was Nicki Soderberg, Ann Dyer, Toni 
Lockhart, and Shannon Carter. The winning 
men's team was tony RoverLson, Tyrone 
Phillips, Jod Dow, and Rodney LighLsey. 
BotJi of these teams performed well at the 
Southeast Rcgionals at Furman, with our 
women's team placing third. Thanks to all 
who participated. 

SRS 

New hours for Safe Rule Shuttle: 
9:30pm - 2am Friday and Sau-uday nights. 



Habitat for Humanity 

Watch for more information about 
our Sandblast! ! on April 25 ti) raise money 
forihc Laurens Habitat Chapter. A number 
of local bands will be donating their tal- 
ents to the cause. Final plans arc also 
being made for a Spring Break trip to 
Pcnsacola, Florida. Formore intormation, 
contact Laura Smith or Maria Mcdcinis. 
Watch the bullcun board in Springs for 
signups for the weekend work trips! 



WOULD IT HELP TO TALK? 

Contact a Peer Connector 

* students who are trained as peer counselors 

* confidential discussion 

* caring 

* nonjudgmental 

* appropriate referrals 

* convenient - just pick up the phone and call a Peer 

Connector 



Peer Connectors: 



David Braghirol 
Ashli Calloway 
Jennifer Hlliott 
Shara Garwood 
Taniara Mann 
Lee Maynard 
Maria Mcidanis 
Helen Moore 
Carolyn Nichols 
Julie Nicl.sen 
Stacey Peters 
Cher Sadler 
Ixe Stokes 
Bill Wright 



ext. 8108 
exL8861 
ext. 8789 
ext. 8948 
ext. 8942 
ext. 8978 
ext. 8934 
ext. 8786 
833-1351 
ext. 8603 
ext. 8777 
ext. 8883 
ext. 8783 
ext. 8673 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVI Number 9 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Chnlon, South Carolina 29325 



Friday. February 28, WW* 



Presidential candidates debate campaign issues 



The foUoMing are questions that the three SGA 
presuiential caruUdaies were asked to answer. 

In your opinion, what is the status of race 
relations on the PC campus? As S(iA 
President, what would you do to improve 
race relations at PC? 

Martin : While spending the past year on the 
Minority Concerns Committee, 1 have real- 
ized that many students are unaware of the 
racial issues here at PC. Al- 
though steps have been taken 
to improve racial relations and 
racial awareness; such as Cul- 
tural Diversity Week. Black 
History Month, and the push 
to observe Martin Luther King 
Jr.'s birthday; student partici- 
pation is still low. Additional 
emphasis should be placed on 
getting people to participate 
with a open mind. Students 
should develop a greater sense 
of racial awareness. Once 
aware of the situation faced 
by minority students, the stu- 
dent body can move to ea.se these problems. 
As SGA president, 1 would encourage every 
attempt to increase racial awareness and con- 
tinue the work which 1 have done with the 
Minority Concerns Committee. 



A lot of attention has been devoted re- it. How do you rate PC's recycling pro- 
cently to violence at the Fraternity Court gram and what do you suggest SGA can do 
What do you feel the problem is and what to increase environmental awareness? 
would you suggest to correct that prob- 
lem? Martin : I think PC's recycling program is a 

big success. At the begmning of the year, 

Martin : The events are very unfortunate and SGA presented to the administration the idea 

those involved have been dealt with by the of increasing environmental awareness and 



With inaeased support and interest, I 
would like to encourage "Environmenial 
Awareness" as a theme for guest lecturCTs, 
films, and onhex CEPs. This is not nierely 
a PC problem; it is a universal one, and it 
deserves aiieniion. 




Mike Martin 



IFC and Dean Nixon. 1 do not believe that 
there are major problems inherit in our frater- 
nity system. In the near future, additional 
emphasis should be placed 
3n developing stronger in- 
ler-fratemity relations. In 
addition, IFC should be en- 
couraged to become a stron- 
ger organization. By devel- 
oping stronger inier-frater- 
nity relations and having a 
strong IPC. future incidents 
can be avoided. 

^lcKav : I can see three types 
of violence that can occur at 
Fraternity Court. There can 
be problems among Greeks, 
between Independents and 
Greeks, and between members of the com- 
munity and Greeks. In my opinion, all of the 
possible problems that may arise between 



the idea of a campus wide recycling program. 
Due to many hours of hard work by individu- 
als such as Jeff Smith, Jodie Will, and Heather 
Moncrief, the program has re- 
all y gotten off the ground. It is 
SGA's job, as well as the stu- 
dent body's, to continue the 
work that has already been 
done. From participating in 
recycle pick-ups to writing 
articles in the environment 
section of the Blue Stocking, 
there are many ways for stu- 
dents to get involved. There 
are a variety of steps that can 
be taken in the future in order 
to increase environmental 
awareness, such as adding re- 
cycling containers at Frater- Frank McKay 



Should PC distribute cmidoms to stu- 
dents in an effort to protect them from 
sexually transmitted diseases? 




Ma£lill The distribution 
of condoms by PC is a very 
sensitive subject. The 
preserKe of sexually trans- 
muted diseases and the 
sexual activity mKxig PC 
students can not be ignored. 
I believe that condoms 
should be placed on the PC 
campus. I realize many 
parents and guests might 
find It alarming to find a 
condom machine in the 
dorms. However, a suit- 
able location should be 
sought, and condoms 



nity Court, continuing to offer environmen- should be offered at a reduced price or 
tal CEPs, and continuing to pl«;e pressure on free. 
the admmistrauon todiscontinue use of envi- 



these three groups are results of the lack of ronmentally unsafe products, such as 
consideration for others by one or more of styrofoam. 
these groups. This lack of consideration can 



McKay : 1 believe that racial tensions this be directed toward a 
year are better than in the past two years. We fraternity's right to individu- 
have had no major incidents this year to my ality, its property, and its ide- 



knowledge. As president, 1 would encourage 
all students to interrelate with those of a 
different race as much as possible, not neces- 
sarily m a racial forum, although those meet- 
ings can be helpful, but m everyday student 
life. I feel that those people who are unwill- 
ing to accept others' rights to have their own 
cultures, religions, or political views are re- 
jecting a major portion of the liberal arts 
educatiwi. 

Moncrief While many students still refuse 
to accept that PC has a racial problem, 1 feel 
that others have not only ra:opizcd the 
problem but have also begun to take steps 
towards solving it. However the planning of 
many diversity awareness programs as well 
as the proposal for an Afncan American 
Studies minor are merely initial steps. Mass 
student interest is definitely lacking; evi- 
dence of this is visible in the low attendance 
at the planned programs. How can an interest 



^ 



als. Although most of the 
problems at Fraternity Court 
occur because of an 
individual's actions, each fra- 
ternity should be more careful 
in the regulation of its parties 
and Its guest in order to lessen 
the likelihood of a violent in- 
cident. 

Mamikl: A key problem m 
this area is inconsistency in 
disciplinary action. There ap- 
pears to be an inconsistency 
in enforcement of policy by the Dean of 
Students Office. A set policy needs to be 
established and maintained for dealing with 
acts of violence by and against students of 
Presbytenan College. Students knowledge- 
able of inevitable punishment may be less 
likely to commit such acts. However as 



McKav : Although I feel that it is the 
individual's respcmsibility to take action 
to prevent such diseases, it may be a good 
idea to make condoms available to students 
in order to encourage action against sexu- 
gained a strong foothold, but ally transmitted diseases. 1 am personally 
It will require very much ef- (^>posed to con(k>m dispensers in the 



McKay: The recycling 
movement on campus has 




dorms, but if elected president it is not my 
decision to make, it is the students' deci- 
sion. I think that taking this action may 
damage the school s image, but it may be 
in the best interest of the studoits to pro- 
vide for their health. If the school were to 
licksmihe Blue Stocking, but implement this policy, I would encourage 
I feel that the best way to that the condoms be given to resident 

assistants to Uien be given to any student 
who requests one. 



fart U(xn the students to con- 
tinue. I'm sure that there arc 
ways that the Recycling 
Board can gain support from 
the students such as continu- 
ing to print uiformauve ar- 



Heather Moncrief 



strengthen this movement on 
campus is for each student 
who is interested to take the 
initiative to sptts^i his inter- 
est to others so that this con- 



cern will spread to every person on campus. 
Moncrief : Asoneofthekeyestabhshersand 



Moncrief : With the daily rise in AIDS 
cases m our region, I believe Presbyterian 
Collegecannolongengnore the issue. By 
no longer ignoring the issue, PC can not 
abandon the idea of disU'ibuting condoms. 



a member of the Recycling Board as well as Inmy opinnm.thcmcansof dismbutionis 



the Environment Editor for the Blue Stock- 
ing, 1 feel c(Mifi(knt m saying that recycling 
on our campus has made ^eat strides. Par- 



things stand at present, this fear of punish- ucipation in some buildings is higher than in 



be created? As SGA president, my first goal ment appears to be lacking. The steps IPC 



in solving this problem would be education. 
Individuals must be forced to stop ignonng 
such a crucial problem on our campus. Fo- 
rums can only help the problem if the infor- 
mation gained is utilized. If elected, 1 plan to 
not only utilize such ideas but also to reach 
out to other student organizations for further 
ideas. 



has made recently towards developing new 
policy to govern such incidents are to be 
commended, but they must be enforced by 
both ends of the spectrum. As president, 1 
would promote such enforcement. 

More students are heiominn aware of the 
environment and their role in protecting 



others; but through education and "peer pres- 
sure", 1 hope more members of the PC com- 
munity will bccanc involved in recycling. 
When we (the R«;ycling Board) place con- 
tainers at the fraternity houses in March, 1 
feet that more students will be able to take an 
active role in the program. While the Blue 
Slocking IS presently the mam source of edu- 
cati(Mi, the process must be taken further. 



the only question. Dispcnsors ccxUd be 
placed in dormitcx-ies or in a few cemral 
locauons, or condoms cmild be handed 
outrand«nly. I fear the last case would be 
rather unsuccessful, but it is ui i(fea. 
Students shoukl not be falsely 1^ tobel^vc 
that any sex is 100 percent safe sex, they 
should realize that there is such a thing a 
s^cr sex. PC should not merely be con- 
cerned with the education of its studaits; 
It should alst) be ctuKcme^ with the pro- 
icctKwi of their health so they will be able 
to utilize the educaticxi they receive. 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



EDITORIAL 



GDH acting irresponsibly by serving polystyrene 



Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor 



by Jason West 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Throughout my life, I have al- 
ways considered myself to be a 
conservative, sheltered, Southern 
Baptist, all-American from a small 
town in South Carolina. My world 
has revolved around family, tradi- 
tion, church, and friends. I guess 
you could say that my background 
is right out of the pages of "Our 
Town" or "h's A Wonderful Life." 

Being a conservative, one 
would not expect me to be an envi- 
ronmentalist. Well, I didn't use to 
be one. I never recycled anything 
until I came to PC. I carelessly 
threw away paper, used polysty- 
rene extensively, and thought that 
people who recycled aluminum 
were just "cheapskates" who were 
trying to make a little extra money 
by going through the trash or walk- 
ing along the highways collecting 
cans. I also thought that people 
who pushed for environmental re- 
forms were "dangerous liberals," 
who were far to "radical" to be 
taken seriously. I can clearly see 
now that my perception of envi- 
ronmentalism was very limited and 
distorted. 

Since coming to PC and broad- 
ening my horizons, I realize that 
environmentalism should not be 
considered an ideological move- 
ment which pits "conservatives" 
against "liberals." Instead, it should 
be a movement that meets no 
boundaries and is of importance to 
us all! 

I am here to tell you that the 
Earth is dying! All you have to do 
is read a magazine or watch the 



nightly news to see that this is true. 
Everyday, the hole in the ozone 
layer increases by two percent. 
Every second, a portion of rain 
forest the size of a football field is 
destroyed. Everyday, 480 
polystrene items are used in 
Greenville Dining Hall (GDH). I 
guess you could say that GDH, in 
addition to the destroyers of the 
rain forests and the industrial pol- 
luters, is an accessory' to the mur- 
der of the planet Earth. 

For F*C to be such a progressive 
school, it doesn't make sence for 
its dining hall to still be serving 
styrofoam. We are all aware of the 
danger that polystyrene does to the 



Well, some things sound too 
good to be true. Here it is Febru- 
ary, and GDH is still using poly- 
styrene extensively. SEE and oth- 
ers have suspected that their agree- 
ment has been broken and that G DH 
is once again ordering polystyrene. 

Last week, SG A President Paul 
Scouten approached Vernon 
Powell, GDH director, to find out 
the truth. Scouten reported that 
Powell became defensive about the 
whole issue and refused to deny or 
confirm whether GDH had reor- 
dered polystyrene. In fact. Powell 
insinuated that Scouten was being 
hypocritical and said to him, "Well, 
your office does reorder paper 



"... in addition to [being] the destroyers of the 
rainforests and the industrial polluters, [GDH] is an 



accessory to the murder of the planet Earth. " 



environment, yet GDH still uses 
styrofoam cups and bowls. 

Last semester, a group of stu- 
dents from SEE (Student for 
Environomcntal Education) ap- 
proached the staff of GDH to re- 
quest that polystyrene no longer be 
served. After some discussion, it 
was agreed that GDH would no 
longer purchase polystyrene. How- 
ever, since the dining hall had 
bought it in bulk before the begin- 
ning of the year, it was decided that 
they would use the polystyrene until 
it ran out. From that point on it 
would no longer be ordered. 



doesn't it?" 

Well, Mr Powell, paper and 
polystyrene are two different 
things. I'm sure that SGA reorders 
paper, just like the Blue Stocking 
does. The difference is that you 
can recycle paper and you can't 
recycle certain elements of poly- 
styrene. However, that is besides 
the point. 

It is irresponsible of GDH and 
its staff to order polystyrene and it 
is even more irresponsible to lie to 
students! In fact, lying is an honor 
code violation. 

Powell has continously stated 



that the reason he orders polysty- 
rene is because students request it. 
I can't believe that a large number 
of students would ask for a product 
that is know to cause damage to the 
environment. However, next week 
the entire student body will be al- 
lowed to vote on a non-binding 
referendum, which asks if polysty- 
rene should be served in GDH. 
The referendum question will ap- 
pear on the ballot with the candi- 
dates for SGA Executive Council. 
1 guess, Mr. Powell, we will find 
out if the students of PC really do 
want polystyrene in GDH. You 
can't deny a vole. 

I believe that it is of vital im- 
portance that all students vote to 
not serve polystyrene in GDH. It's 
the right thing to do because every 
little bit helps. If we are going to 
save the Earth from destruction 
then we lu-e going to have to start in 
our own "backyard." 

I applaud the recent actions of 
the Recycling Board because they 
are making a difference and are 
making recycling easier. 1 also 
applaud the members of SEE for 
serving as an environmental "watch 
dog" for the entire campus. With- 
out these two groups, PC students 
would be missing out on a lot. 
Thanks for all that you do. 

There is an old proverb that 
says, "To whom much is given, 
muchisexpected." As Americans, 
we have been blessed with many 
things, both materially and spiritu- 
ally. Ilierefore. it is our responsi- 
bility to insure that those whocome 
after us will enjoy the blessings we 
currently have. Recycle now; 
tommorrow may be loo late. 



The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton. South Carolina. 29325 
Volume LXXXVI. Number 9 
February 28. 1992 

Editor in-chief Dennie Lynn Hill 

Managing Editor Jason West 

News Editor Paul Atkinson 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

SpcrrLs Editor Brad Busbee 

Entertainment Editor Angie Richardson 

Features Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

Environment Editor Heather Moncnef 

Photography/Darkroom Angela Mills 

Layout Editor Carolyn Nichols 

Copy Editor Mike Weaver 

Advertising Editor Ann Mayficld 

Subscnptions/Exchange Ron Mixon 

Artist Edward Clark 




Photography Staff: 

JohnTritt Margaret Davis JasonWinfield 
Tracy Kurasaka Kimberlec Gibson BillBoan 
Laura Meyers Brad Sims Patrick John Phan 
LceMcAbce Melissa Jackson Li«» Weaver 
Lee Maynard Adnenne Ivey 



Staff Writers: 

Eli/^beth Spann Amanda Bowen 

Karen Wittenbrcxik Frank McKay 
Ed Kirkland Kathenne Bonner 

Everett Catts Adnenne Ivey Nancy Norton 
Cher Fulbright Michelle Cantey 

Ixe Maynard Trenton Arnold 

Shtra G^wcxxl Leigh Heamburg 



The Btue Stoeking is a biweekly student 
puWicaiion of Presbyterian College. The papa 
serves as a forum of news and opinion of regional 
and national concern Ftw advertising, contact 
The Blue Stocking, Presbyienan College Box 
1061. Clinton. SC 29325. The Blue Slocking 
welcomes letters to the editor {mm all members 
of the PC community Signatures arc required 
I-etters are pnnled on a space available bias. The 
Bluestocking reserves the nght to edit all letters 
for proper grammar and puntiuaUon The final 
deadline for submilting letters is Friday at 
12:00pm on the week before puhluaium 



^^^m^ 




IHM 



' '■■* 



Dear Editor: 

In regard lo Warren Blanthard's letter 
in the February 7 issue of ihc Blue Stocking, 
I would like lo ask Blanchard to put aside for 
a moment his super-capiUilisl, "a cnme is a 
crime is a crime" and "all radical feminists 
are dykes" views and look closely at 
America's reality today. 

None of us wants lo believe that hus- 
bands batter their wives, that boyfriends 
batter their girlfriends, or even, lo take an- 
other example from the same i.ssue of the 
Blue Slockini^, that fralcmiiy members fight 
among themselves. We wanilo believe that 
wc live in more enlightened umes. But if we 
fail to recognize that such incidents occur, 
and occur frequently not occassionally , then 
we are either blind, ignorant, in.scnsiuve, 
naive, or perhaps in the worst case, we are 
brutali/.crs ourselves. Statisucs can be 
misleading, bui even if one-tcnih of PC 
women end up marrying men who will baiicr 
them, are we to be pacified by this knowl- 
edge and see this reality as somehow falling 
within the minimum standards of acceptable 
behavior? 

Since Blanchard' s Icitcr appeared, 
several women students at PC have assured 
me ihai they know fellow students who are 
battered by their boyfriends. And thai these 
incidents arc not isolated but indeed are 
widespread. Even if there were only one 
case of such brutality, it would be intolerable. 
Amounts and numbers don't mailer; ihe 
physical safely and emoiional health of all 
individuals do mailer. 

So instead of venung your fruslrauons 
and wrath, Warren Blanchard, on Murphy 
Davis and oiher "radical feminists" like, 
presumably, my wife and partner who has 
shoulder- lenglh hair, wears some make-up, 
and d(Ks rH)i confomi to any stcrotype thai I 
know of (You must have a real need lo 
perpetuate sieranypcs since your letter is 
full of them ) and like me (and 1 have shoulder- 
length hair, a red beard, and other strikingly 
male characicnstjcs), who don't you qjcn 
your eyes and mind, which is presumable 
why you arc gelling an education, and really 
see the campus, society , and world m which 
you live? 

Sincerely, 
Terry Barr 

Dear Fulitor: 

I disagree with the opinion expressed in 
a previous Idler to the ediior concerning 
money PC spent to bring Ed l.oring and 
Murphy Davis lo the convcxation on Janu 
ary 20 and to Wmier Conference. 

I am iroublcd by tlie lack of tolerance 
among us. I come from a very consorxative 
background but my friends havech;»llcnged 
me loexpand my views beyond the "ulopia" 
my parents created for me. I thank God for 
people like Murphy Davis and her husband 
Fd Lt)ring who challenge me to think aN^ul 
the world we live in and my coniniitnicnt to 
those in it. 

1 gel very angry when jx'ople disregard 
those wht) express other views as k'ing"ux) 
radical" People like Murphy and Fvd are the 
ones out on the streets living with ihe 
homeless everyday, and they are the ones 
challenging our lawmakers to respect all 
individuals. 



I was one ot 48 students who spent ihe 
weekend with Murphy Davis and her hus- 
band at Winter Conference. Over the course 
of the weekend, I saw a couple who arc not 
only deeply in love wiih one another but 
with humanity as a whole: all of humanity, 
including the criminals, the homeless, and 
other undesirables of our society. There was 
nothing power hungry about these two 
ministers. After all, these people arc paid 
roughly S80 a month for their work! 

While destroying your TV may be ex- 
u^emc, the idea behind it is a valid one. How 
many of us spend our free lime on MTV or 
"One Life to Live," instead of public TV? Ii 
is a window to the world bui what world? 1 
think that was Murphy's point. 

As for 50 percent of PC women being 
abused by men, she was u^nsposing national 
statisucs. Unfortunately, it is a faci thai 
roughly half of all women have at one ume 
or another been in an abusive relationship of 
some sort. Intelligence or money does not 
make you immune to this fad. 

We do not have the right tojudgc anyone 
based on their skm color, sexual preference 
or personal appear:ince. You may not like 
the manner m which the message was 
delievered. (The f*hansees didn't much care 
for Jesus' manner either.) It is easy lo get 
offended, but ihai d(x;s not solve any of the 
problems we are now facing, even in our 
own backyard. Only involvement can help. 
If It angers you, gel oui there and see if it's 
true. If it IS true, work to change it 1 think 
ihat cultural enrichment means growth, and 
growth only comes ab(.)ul through change. 

Sincerely, 
JanaC/erwonky 

To the Editor: 

I have been a student ai Presbyienan 
College for over three and a half years, and 
some things thai happen at this schtx)l never 
cease to ama/e me. Last week, I glanced at 
the Blue Stocbni^ and my eye wandered over 
a particular letter addressed to you. To my 
am a/ement (actually, words cannot descntie 
my stale of mmd) this letter was a blatant 
atUick upon Ms. Murphy Davis, a fine woman 
who was invited to K' to address the student 
b<xly at a CEP event on January 20, 1992. 
RegretUibly, I was unable to attend the lec- 
ture; however, I do not wish to divagate 
upt)n the subject matter ol the speech - 
knowing first hand of Ms. Davis' accom- 
plishments, I'm sure a was a fine one. 1 
found the letter astonishing on the grounds 
that 1 underst:ind and know what Ms. Davis 
has contributed to the betterment of my 
home, Atlanta, Cie^trgia. She has allempied 
to heal the stKwl wounds found m many 
Atlanta neighborhtxxls where the majority 
of PC students wi>uld tear lo uead. Simply: 
the letter was an abomination to our schcx)!, 
our intelligence, and lo our academic in- 
tegrity 

Alter re aailiiig llic Idler in question, I 
surmised that ifie auilior obviously has a t irm 
grip on the concepts of temperance and tact 
He was especial I v adept at addressing the 
ideals and phik>sophiesot one ol my personal 
heroes. Dr. Mamn Luther King, Jr., of whom 
Ms. Davis was sjK'aking in memoriam. 1 
also inferred that he mainiiiinedascnsiuviiy 
toward the obligations of all "gcxxl 'ole red- 
bkxxled Americans" lo maintain a sense of 



political correctness concerning an 
individual's choice of lifestyle, especially 
by discussing such an agenda in a college- 
sponsored newspaper, which is, I mighiadd, 
open to interpretation and criticism from all 
venues of intelligentsia and xademia. 

Additionally, the author was very keen 
in parlaying his knowledge of the missions 
of the National Organization for Women, as 
well as the Gay Rights Lobby. He was 
exu-emely helpful m explaining Soviet and 
Eastern Bl(x;k economics to the readers with 
his vast knowledge of the subject Perhaps 
we should replace Bons Yelism with Sam 
Walton? After all, Walton seems to be 
perfect for running the Commonwealth of 
Independent States. Subsequently, it is our 
moral imperative lo model their fledging 
democracy after our own. 

After showing the questionable letter 10 
a number of faculty members of a fellow 
Presbyterian insutution, Agnes Scott Col- 
lege, I found their reactions to be as, if not 
more , astounded than mine. Off the record, 
they found it difficult to believe that indi- 
viduals so reactionary in nature would even 
attend Presbyterian College. 

I am not incensed at the fact that the 
questionable letter was published by the 
Blue Stocking. I am amazed at the content of 
the letter itselL It would seem logical that if 
such letters continue to pervade, then abso- 
lutely no speaker worth his weight m gold in 
Ihe academic community would want to 
lecture at Presbyterian College, no matter 
whaiiheoccassion. Perhaps, at this juncture, 
it would be prudent to invite Representative 
David Duke lo lecture the student body on 
'Truth, Justice, and the American Way" and 
lo forget the rest of the scheduled CEP 
events? 

Who knows what would happen if the 
author of the letter actually Iqsj his "Win- 
dow 10 the World" (i.e. his television) - he 
might in fad, read the newspaper. After all, 
you can't believe everything you see on the 
Morton Downev. Jr. Show. 

Sincerely. 

M. P. Darling, Jr. 



To All: 

I would like to first draw the ailcniion of 
the reader to the opening. Notice that it is 
not addressed "To Whom it May Concern," 
buinither"ToAll." The jusuficaiion for this 
IS the majority of students on the Presbyie- 
nan College campus are not concerned. So, 
I must reach out with all my literary abilities 
to catch those who do not seem to care. 

The ftxrus of this letter is not about 
racism or hatfed, which seems ui be the focal 
point of many Idlers, but rather it is abi>ui 
the problem of styrofoam. How many rcatters 
can say that they are truly conscious of the 
prwblem entailed wiih styrofoam '^ Too many 
people don't realize that styrofoam dwsn't 
go away. It is here to .stay. You might think 
to yourself that raycling it is the obvious 
answer. No. sorry, it is not that easy. The 
gases given off when siymtbam is recycled 
are toxic, and worse for the environment 
than an mdusuial smokestack. There is no 
answer to the problems that stymfoam cre- 
ates. 

If styofoam is so hazardous lo the envi- 
ronment, you would think thaipci.>plc would 



be conscious of the fact Well not only are 
people denying ihe environment, but our so 
called liberal alma mater, Presbyterian 
College, is also. 

At first, it was said that the school had 
purchased styrofoam in bulk, and would 
fu^st have lo use all the purchased toxins 
before they could buy the more preferable 
choice, paper cups. Well friends, even I was 
fooled by this flagrant violation of the Honor 
Code. In fact the school has continued to 
purchase these cups of poison despite the 
uprcKir of a few concerned students. It is 
lime 10 put a stop lo this travesty. 

All 1 ask of the student body is to 
raognize a problem , for there is no denying 
the fad that there is a problem here. It needs 
to be reconciled. Once you have recognized 
a problem you are already on your way lo a 
soluuon. If you feel justified using styrofoam 
even after reading this letter then it is your 
problem. If you can not justify using 
styrofoam, then don't. Take three small 
glasses instead of two large non degradable 
cups. In.siead of using a bowl that will be an 
eye sore for your great-grandchildren, use a 
washable bowl. When GDH serves every- 
thing in styrofoam, refuse to accept it If 
people will not accept their meals on 
styrofoam, GDH will be forced lo wake up 
and bnng about change. 

I ask anyone who reads this letter to 
lake a picturesque drive lo the falls, a famous 
hangout for many Presbyienan students. 
You will find in the mist of Ihe beauuful, 
raging water, one of ihe biggest environ- 
mental disasters of ihe greater Clinton area. 
Please take notice of what is going on in the 
environment around you, and do what you 
can 10 help improve your world. Evct if it's 
just refusing a styrofoam cup at GDH, or 
denying the styrofoam casing of the Big 
Deluxe at Hardees, or purchasing Camel 
lights (whose filters are biodegradable) rather 
than your regular brand. Take nouce of your 
world. Anse from your latent state of pas- 
sivity and take aciion. Remember abstain- 
ing is sometimes the best way U) keep yourself 
out of trouble. A clean earth will always be 
possible, but noi probable. 

Sincerely, 

Jeffrey H. Garrison 

Dear Editor: 

This envir«imeniar'kick"ihai has been 
popular the last couple of years has lx«n 
very beneficial to our suiigglmg planet With 
the 20ih celelH-aiion of Earth Day in 1990, 
people all over the world pledged to save the 
planet Irom destruction, mainly our own. I 
see that ihis envux)nmental euphoria has 
finally suiick Presbyienan College. 

I applaud PC's recent actions. The 
inu^txlucuon of recycling bins throughout 
the campus and ihe creation of a Recycling 
Board arc a start. However, the continued 
use of styrofoam in Greenville Dining Hall 
makes no sense whatsoever. For a .schiX)l lo 
lake this kind of envu-onmenial iniuativc 
may look good on paper (as it did m the la.st 
issue of the Blue Stocking). Yei, a sense of 
hypocrisy anses when the school allows 
styrofoam to be used. Enough said! 



Pc^e, 
Peicr Bayley 



•M LETTKR.S, paf{e 4 



NEWS 



IRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



NEWS 



Jock Rock demolished to make way for an information gazebo 



by Paul Atkinson 
NEWS EDITOR 

Perhaps you haven't no- 
ticed, but a campus landmark 
has been uprooted in the name of 
progress. PC's famed JockRock, 
the large concrete platform once 
located beside Douglas House, 
was demol ished last week to clear 
the way for a new information 
house. The suggestion and fund- 
ing for the new structure comes 
from a private benefactor. 

The new information center 
will be a wood and red brick 
gazebo-style structure that will 
be slightly larger than the old 
JockRock. The ga/ebo will con- 
tain monitors with VCRs, pam- 
phlets, and maps to help prospec- 
tive students and other visitors 
become better acquainted with 
Presbyterian College. It will 
remain open to the public dunng 
the day year-round and will be 
used as a regi station center and 
meeting point for some spaial 
events held by Presbyterian Col- 
lege such as the armual Visitor's 
Day. 

The new information ga/ebo 
will also replace the information 




'I 



-^^ 



^0^ 



i 



A new information gazebo will so<m be eretted where J(Kk R(Kk once stood. 



pholobs Anvt'l.i MdU 



h)ard ItKatcd beside Douglas 
House, but lis concrcic plat- 
form will remain m place to 
serve as a general meeting 
{X)int lor students iind events 
just as J(Kk Rock has in the 
past. 

Some students were sur- 
prised with the sudden re- 
moval of the old Jcxk Rock 
and were angry that the stu- 
dents were not informed of 
ihc administration's decision 
lo do so. The admimsuation 
had, however. coasullcdSGA 
ot Ik lals m the fall of last year 
i)t Its plans to build the new 
information center in the 
place of the JcKk Rixk. 

Skip Zubrixl, vice-presi- 
^cu{ lor linance, expressed 
gretful concerns that the 
ludeni bixly hail not been 
lirectly notified of the 
si.h(K)rs decision to replace 
the concrete plalfomi, but he 
lxlic\i.'d that the now Niruc- 
lure would be more benefi- 
t-ial and aesthetically pleas- 
ing lor the school. 
The new infomiation center 
is expected to be completed 
ihis spring. 



Tour six Civil War Battlefields and 

get CEP credit. For more 

information, call Dr. Needham 



Food Committee gives report 



by Paul Atkinson 
NEWS EDITOR 

SGA's Fcxxl Committee has com- 



* There are currently two new salad 
dressings available in CJDH. 

* The styrofoam supply is quite large 
but IS being depicted. Why does GDH 



Candidates seek SGA positions 

Elections scheduled for next week 



b; Jason West 

MANAGING EDrrOR 

Thirteen c^Klidates have antKxmced 
their intentions to seek six positioiurffi the 
Executive Council of the Student Govern- 
ment Avwciation (SGA). Election)? for the 
Executive Council aire scheduled for 
Wednesday, MantJi 4. A possible nin-t>ff 
electkm has been scheduled for March 5. 

Michael Martin, Prank McKay and 
HeattKi Moncrief have all declared their 
candidacies fcBT SGA President. Miatmis 
a 5 year scniw from Simjwwville, South 
Ctfoiina mA cisrently serves on SGA as a 
senior rcpreticntativc. McKay is a jimior 
from Dunwoody, Ge<H'gia ^ has never 
served tm SGA before. Moncrief is ajunior 
from Clinton. South Carolina andcurremiy 
serves SGA m a junun- clavs leprescittalivc. 

Weody Hubbard, Rchi Mixon, Hagan 
Thompson and }ay Sims have all declared 
their candidacies for SGA Vice President. 
Hubbwd is a junior from Ad^ta, Georgia 
amdistlKctffrentSGAsciactary. Mixonis 
ajunior from Rome, Georgia and has never 
held an elected SGA office. Thompson is 
a sophomore from Milledgevilk. Georgia 



and has served this year as a sophomore 
class representative. Sims is a juniw from 
Columbia, South Carolina and currently 
holds the office of junior class representa- 
tive. 

The office of SGA secretitfy is being 
sought by Whui Min Chang mtS Cathy 
Copley. Chang is a freshman from 
Orangebtffg, South C»olina, and Copley is 
a soph(.>more from Clinton. Neither Chang 
nor Copley have served on SGA before. 

Karen Shapcr is the only announced 
caodidate for the olTice of SGA u^casurer. 
Sh»pcr is a freshman from Che raw, South 
Carolina and has also never served on SGA 
before. 

Meg Oxford is the only announced 
candidate for the office of SUB president 
Oxford IS a junior from Griffen. Georgia 
and has never served on SGA bcftwe. 

BJ. Courell and Lauren Owmgs have 
announced their candidacies for judictal 
council chairperson. Coilrcll is a )mw( 
from Frankim, Tenneiiee, and Owings is a 
sophomore from E»ley, South Carolina. 
Both candtdaie^i presently save on the Judi- 
cial Coimcil 




Karen Wittenbrook fixes a salad at 

piled the following list of "1(kh1 laets " 
for any one concerned about i)[>^r:)iii.iiv, 
at Greenville Dining Hall (GDH 

* Did you know that you only pay 
for 70 percent of your meals at GDH ' 
Many PC students think they pay for 
every meal at GDH, however the system 
is designed to take into account the fad 
that YOU IX) NOT eat every meal at 
(il)|| 

* A meal plan which would allow a 
student lo purchase 15 meals a week 
would only save you about $2S versus 
the current system. Why is this.' It is a 
direct result of the fact that PC students 
pay for only 70 percent of iheir meals. 
Also, if l\' did csiabi ish a meal plan of 1 
lo 1 .*) meals a week, the cost of a eompui 
eri/ed system would dramatically out 
weigh ihc$25cxtra paid by each siudem! 



.1 



'''*••• pholo by Angela MilLs 

have so much styrofoam' It was cheaper 
for the sch(H)l to buy the cups and bowls 
in mass quantities, therefore the sch(x>l 
has enough styrofoam to last an entire 
school year 

* Now there are two soups being 
served daily at GDH. The lelt side of 
GDH has a different soup than the right 
side 

AiiDidiiig lo VVciutv Hut>t)aul,.SGA 
Set retary, the I (KKlCommiiiec needs your 
help for new ideas and suggestions. 
Hubbard suggests that if you have a prob- 
leni with something in (JDH, don't sit 
back and complain to your friends Take 
the time lo share your concerns with either 
Vermm Powell or Ray Bell Ihe Ftxxl 
Committee ask that suggestions be sent to 
Box 1060 or you can contact Hubbard or 
SGA Reprcsentalivc I Van Sheorn. 



South Carolina General Assembly to look at DUI bill 



by Leigh Heamburg 

STAFF WRITER 

The South Carolina General Assembly 
is currenUy considenng a conyovcrsial bill 
that would drastically change South 
Carolina's DUI laws. 

The proposed bill would change the 



Opponents to the bill say that it would the opponents of the bill seem to want to 
only serve to scare off tourists and that the protect drunk drivers. 



breathalyzer Ls not as reliable and accurraie 
as we are led to believe. 

Thomas Spon.scller, executive director 
of "iie South Carolina Hospitality Associa- 
tion, pointed out to members of the House 
diat the year after Maine lowered its limit to 



current DUI legal blood alcohol ================================^^ 

ieveiof.i0to.08. It would also set ". . . representatives are being flooded 



the limit for minors at .04 and re- 
quire an immediate loss of their 
license for 90 days if found in vio- 
lation. ===z 
The bill would also require that every- 
one arrested be videotaped so that the tape 
could be used as evidence in court. The 
battle lines have been drawn among those 
for and againsi this proposed bill. Testi- 
mony before House committees has already 
begun. 



with evidence and proposals from 
both sides. " 



.08. alcoholic fatalities increased by 7 per- 
cent. He said that if ihis bill should pass it 
would simply be a "waste of law enforce- 
ment effort." 

Those in favor of the bill, including a 
very su-ong conungent from Mothers Againsi 
Drunk Driving (MADD), have argued that 



[)cnnis Nady with the Stale Commis- 
sion on Alcohol and Drug Abuse reported 
on studies that showed that people with a .0^ 
blood alcohol level were 3.5 times as likely 
to be mvolved in a crash and nearly twice as 
likely to die in a crash. MADD is fighting 

•^or even stncter laws including a 

level of .04 for minors. 

As the House considers this bill, 

representatives are being flooded 

with evidence and proposals from 
. both sides. Several proposals in- 

volved with this bill have already been 
thrown out by a House sub-committee, but 
that hasn't slopped MADD, which is still 
fighting for much suicter laws dian South 
Carolina currently has. The logistics of the 
bill are still changing as is its fate, and the 
debate continues. 



Tsongas wins in New Hampshirc; candidates prepare for Super Tuesday 



by Ted Carmichael 
POLITICS EDITOR 



and 2,144 of those are needed to get the 
nomination. 

Buchanan did much better than most 

As usual, the voters of New Hampshire people expected. He won 37 percent of the 

had a few surpnses for the presidential popular vote, and of the 1,105 republican 

candidates. At the nation's first primary, delegates needed for die nomination, he has 

held on February 18, Paul Tsongas came 9 to Bush's 14. When addressing his sup- 



money will keep up, especially in light of 
how well he has done in the first primary. 
Bush's people are not that womed how- 
ever. New Hampshire is known for being 
rather unique in die way it votes, and the 
recession has done more damage there than 
m most odier states. Also, Bush has much 



out ahead with 35 percent of the popular porters Tuesday night, Buchanan said, sponger supply lines when it comes to funds, 



vote. And in the GOP, Buchanan 
surpassed expectations Dy hnishing 
just 16 percentage points behind 
President Bush. 

Tsongas had been slowly build- 
ing up support over the past few 
weeks. According to one staff 
member, the "slow but steady" ap- 
proach is normal for one of his cam- 
paigns. He has mediodically worked 
on his name recognition, and 
suuggled -not in vain- to improve 
his speaking ablility. In an inter- 
view he jokingly remarked, "At die 
beginning, 1 was sort of irritated that 
no one bodiered to look for dirt. ' 
Because of his win in New Hamp- 
shire, he is hopeful of receiving some 
much needed publicity, but he will 
also be die focus of the press's close 
scrutiny. 

The ex -Senators' biggest prob- 
lem, however, is going to be getting 
voles m the South, where he is rela- 
tively unknown. He doesn't have a 
very .suong organi/iition and, like 
most of the demcxratic candidates 
hasjust about run out of money. Bill 
Clinton, on the other hand, is doing 
well in both departments, and is 
expected lo pick up a lot of votes on 
March 10, which is this year's "Su- 
per Tue.silay." Clinton wasoptimis 
tic last week, and with gixxl reastMi. 
Even though he recieved only 26 
percent of the jxipular vole, he man 
aged lo pick up half of the IX^mo 
cratic delegates m New Hampshire, lying 
Tst)ngas wiili nine. Out of all the delegates 
coniiiuttcd as of Sunday , Tsongas has only 
1 1 , while Clinton has 90. Tom Hiirkm is in 
second with 65. thanks primarily \o his 
home state ol Iowa. There are a touil ol 
4 .■»S7 (j,-l.'>' (1. ■'v lor the iVnuKratn. parl>, 




(leorge Bush 



file photo 



W hai started as a lililc rcbellK'i) has turned 
inloa full Hedged revolution." And later, he 
added, "We are going to lake our party 
back. and take our counu^y back." Although 
hard up for cash after s{>endmg over two 
million dollars in New Hampshire, 
Buchanan's jx-ople are confideiii dial the 



Around the World 



and his national campaign is more 
organized. And finally, if the 
counuy eases out of die recession 
diis summer, as most economists 
predict, a lot of the pressure will be 
off Bush. 

The next few weeks will be very 
important in the Bush-Buchanan 
battle . They are both concentrating 
on die South, where most of the 
pnmancs between now and "Super 

Tuesday" are. Last week die two 
spoke to crowds in Charleston thai 
were less than a block away, and 
diey also plan to hit Georgia before 
the March 3 primary there. 
Buchanan may be in u^ouble here, 
where the recession is less severe, 
and where Bush is known to have a 
lot of support. According to one 
political analyst. Bush plans to ap- 
peal to the stereotypical southern 
pauiotism with many references to 
"Operation Descn Storm." Most 
importantly diough. Bush plans on 
pamiing Buchanan asa"dangerous 
fringe" candidate, but without di- 
rect attacks thai would give 
Buchanan more credibility. 

The South will also be an impor- 
tant battleground for the Demo- 
craus. This will be the test for 
Kerry, Harkin. and Brown as they 
scratch for funds they'll need to 
take third place. Clinton is ex- 
(X'cled 10 gel a lot of support from 
this region, and according to Dr. 
Kenneth Orr, he may even drop by PC on 
his swing through South Carolina. As for 
Tsongas, if he can last through the next few 
weeks, the campaigns will head back up 
North w here he generally has more support. 
Then we will see if he is able U) "send 
Washington a message 



Indianapolis, Ind. - "Iron" Mike 
Tyson was found guilty of rape and two 
counts of criminal sexual-deviate conduct 
His »xuser was Desiree Washington, a 
native of Coventry, Rhode Island, and a 
conte.stantin the 1991 Miss Black America 
Pageant Sentencing is scheduled for 
March 27, but Tyson plans to appeal the 
decision. He has htfed Hazard law pro- 
fessor Alan Dershowitz, who wice repre- 
sented lelevangelist Jim Baker. 

AT&T has recenUy unveiled its new 
VideoPhone 2500. a device thai comes 
with a tiny camera lens and color screen. 
Similar devices have existed fen* decades, 
but this is die first that doe»i't need ex- 
pensive special equipment to work. The 
VideoPhone uses new technology to work 
on st^dard telephone lines and transmits 
six images per second (compared lo 30/ 
sec. for TV). It should be availirt)le in May 
of this year , and IS expected to a»t $ 1 .500. 

Milwaukee, Wis. - Jeffrey Dahmcr 
was found sane by a lO-to-2 jury verdict. 
He has already pleaded guilty to the murder 
and dismemberment of 1 5 men and admit- 
ted to eating body parts and having sex 
with some of the corpses. He faces a 
mandatory lifesenience for each killing. 

San Francisco, CaL - Taxi driver 
Charles Holkmi chased a mugger with his 
cab and pinned him against the wall of a 
building. The mugger, whose leg was 
broken during the citizen's arrest, was 
sentenced to 1 years for robbery , but won 
a suit against HolkMn saying dutt the ci^y 
used excessive force. When word of the 
verdict got around, a local radio station 
helped raise over $25,000 to cover the 
expenses. Holland says he would do "ex- 
acUy the same thing again." 

London, England - LastmonUi John 
Major and Boris Yeltsin were surprised at 
die tardmess of dicir respecuve secretar- 
ies of defense, Tom King and Marshal 
Yevgeny. The excuse: They had burnt the 
midnight oil while partaking in a case of 
rare 1939 Crimean champagne. Major 
was not pleased at the bad form, but 
Yeltsin, perhaps widi envy, exclaimed, 
"Good God! I Uiought all of Uiat vintage 
had been drunk by Khrushchev!" 



Russia - Yeltsin's jump to a market 
economy ls starting to show some signs of 
success as fax! finds us way to the mar- 
ketplace. When die pnce supports for all 
goods were removed a few months ago. 
die country was shocked when prices in- 
creased by as much as 20 pwcent. Now 
Uiey seem to be leveling off, and in some 
cases pnccs are even going down. One of 
the major factors in Uiis trend is the 
strengthening of the mblc. The Central 
Bank of Rus.sia has reduced die money 
supply by .^0 peaent, and foreign inves- 
tors are snatching up mblcs m order to 
invest in slate-owned properties. However, 
ihc production and employment tosses 
may prove to be too much to overcome. 
and ihc Russian people still have a long 
way to go 



J 



NEWS 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



Jock Rock demolished to make way for an information gazebo 



by Paul Atkinson 

NEWS EDITOR 

Perhaps you havcn'i no- 
ticed, but a campus landmark 
has been uprooted in the name of 
progress. PC's famed JockRock, 
the large concrete platform once 
located beside Douglas House, 
was demolished last week toclear 
the way for a new information 
house. The suggestion and fund- 
ing for the new structure comes 
from a private benefactor. 

The new information center 
will be a wood and red brick 
gazebo-style structure thai will 
be slightly larger than the old 
Jock Rock. The gazebo will con- 
lain monitors with VCRs, pam- 
phlets, and maps to help prospec- 
tive students and other visitors 
become belter acquainted with 
Presbyterian College. It will 
remain open to the public during 
the day year-round and will be 
used as a registration center and 
meeting point for some special 
events held by Presbyterian Col- 
lege such as the annual Visitor's 
Day. 

The new information gazebo 
will also replace tJie information 




%. 



•;*tPii^''?«S' 



I 



A new information gazebo will soon he erected where J(Kk RcKk once sUntd. 



photo by Angela MilLs 



b(Kird Uk alcd beside IX)ugla.s 
House, bui lis concrete plai- 
lorin will remam in place to 
serve as a general meeting 
lH)ini lor students and events 
just as J(Kk Rock has in iht 
past. 

Some students were sur- 
prised with the sudden re- 
moval of the old JtK'k Rock 
anil \Hcre angry thai the stu- 
dents were not mfonned of 
the administration's decision 
to do so. The administration 
had, howc ver, consulted SGA 
oil icials in ihc fall of last year 
ol Its plans to build the new 
iiiforiiialion center in the 
place of the Jock RcKk. 

Skip Zubrixl, vice-prcsi- 
(lent lor finance, expressed 
togretlul concerns that the 
student btxly hail noi been 
itirectly notified of the 
sihcHil's decision lo replace 
the concrete plailomi. but he 
k'licvcd thai the new siruc 
lure would he more benefi- 
cial and aesiheiically pleas- 
ing tor the school. 
The new infomiaiion center 
IS e.x[vcied to be completed 
this spring. 



Tour six Civil War Battlefields and 

get CEP credit. For more 

information, call Dr. Needham 



Food Committee gives report 



by Paul AtkinMm 

NEWS EDITOR 

SGA's Food Commiiice has com- 



* There are currently two new salad 
dressings available in GDH. 

* The styrofoam supply is quiie large 
but IS being depleted. Why does GDH 



Candidates seek SGA positions 

Elections scheduled for next week 



by Jason Wcjt 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Thirteen candidates have announced 
their intentions to seek six positimis on the 
Executive Council of the Student Govern- 
ment Association (SGA). Elections for the 
Execotive Council are scheduled for 
Wednesttey, March 4. A possible nm-off 
Section has been scheduled for March 5. 

Michael Matin. Frank McKay and 
Heather Moncncf have all declared their 
candidacies for SGA President. Martin is 
a 5 year senior from Simpsonvillc, South 
Carolina and currenUy serves on SGA as a 
senior representative. McKay i.s a junior 
from Dtiowoody, Georgia and has never 
served on SGA before. MrMKriefisajunior 
fromainton, South Carol ina and currently 
serves SGA as a junior clavs repreacntalive . 

Wcody Hubbard. Ron Mixon. Hagan 
Thompson and lay Sims have alt (kclared 
thctf candidacies far SGA Vice President. 
Hubbsfld is a jtaitor fnmi Atlanta, Gecwgta 
and isthccwTcntSGA secretary. Mixon is 
a^ifliw from Rome, Georgia and has iiev» 
held «B elected SGA ofrice. Thompson is 
a sophomore from Millcdgeville, Oeorgai 



and has served this year as a sophc>monj 
class represenuuive. Sims is a junior from 
Columbia, South Carolina and currently 
holds ibe office of junior class represenia* 
live. 

The office of SGA secretaffy is being 
sought by Whui Min Chang and Cathy 
Copley. Chang is a freshman from 
OrangebtH^, South Ciffolina, and Copley is 
a sophomore from Clinion Neither Chang 
nor Copley have served on SGA before. 

Kait;n Shwper is the only announced 
candidate for the office of SGA treasurer. 
Sharper is a freshman from Cheraw, South 
Carotma and has also never served on SGA 
before. 

Meg Oxford is the only announced 
candidate for the office of SUB fwesidenL 
Oxford IS a junior from Griff en, Georgia 
and has never served on SGA before. 

BJ. Courell and Lauren Owmgs have 
announced d^eir candidacies Ux judicial 
council chaifpcrs(»n. Cottrell is a junior 
from Fnuiklm, rermcsee, and Owings is a 
sophomore from Easley, South Carolina. 
Bodtcwididates presently serve on die Judi- 
cial Council. 




Karen Wittenbrook fixes a salad at 

piled ihe following list of "IukkI lacls" 
for any one concerned aboul oiK-raiions 
at Greenville Dining Hall (GDH) 

* Did you know that you only pay 
for 70 percent of your meals al GDH' 
Many PC students think ihey pay for 
every meal alGDH, however the sysicm 
is designed to take inio account the fact 
Ihai YOU DO NOT eat every meal at 
GDH. 

* A meal plan which would allow a 
student to purchase \5 meals a x^r.k 
would only save you about $25 versus 
the curreni system. Why is this ,' It is a 
direct result of the faci ihai PC students 
pay for only 70 percent of iheir meals 
Also.ifK'didcsiablishamealplanof 10 
lo 1 5 meals a week , the cost of a compul- 
eri/ed sysicm would dramatically out- 
weigh the $25cxira paid by each student! 



.1 



< • ' ' H . photo by A ngela MilLs 
have so much styrofoam'.' It was cheaper 
for the sch(K)l to buy the cups and bowls 
111 mass quaiitiiies. therefore the schtx)l 
has enough styrofoam lo lasl an entire 
sch(X)l year 

* Now there are two soups being 
served daily at GDH. The left side of 

< iDH has a different soup than the right 
sule. 

According to Wendy Hubbard, SGA 
Secretary , the Itxxl Committee needs your 
help lor new ideas and suggestions. 
Hubbard suggests that if you have a prob- 
lem with something in CiOH, don't sit 
back and complain to your friends. Take 
the time lo share your concerns wiihcidier 
Vernon Powell or Ray Bell. The Fotxl 
Cinnmiitec ask that suggestions be sent to 
Box IOW)()r you can contact Hubbard or 
SGA Rcprcsenialivc Dean Sheom. 



NEWS 






South Carolina General Assembly to look at DUI bill 



by Leigh Heamburg 

STAFF WRITER 

The SouUi Carolina General Assembly 
is currendy considering a conuoversial bill 
that would drastically change South 
Carolina's DUI laws. 

The proposed bill would change die 
current DUI legal blood alcohol 
level of. 10 to .08. It would also sei 
the limit for minors at .04 and re- 
quire an immediate loss of their 
license for 90 days if found m vio- 
lation. 



Opponents to the bill say that it would ihe opponents of the bill seem to want to 
only serve to scare off tourists and that die protect drunk drivers. 



breadialyzer Ls not as reliable and accurraie 
as we are led to believe. 

Thomas Sponscller, executive du^ecior 
of die Soudi Carolina Hospitality Associa- 
tion, pointed out lo members of die House 
dial die year after Maine lowered its limit to 



". . . representatives are being flooded 

with evidence and proposals from 

both sides. " 



Dennis NaUy widi die State Commis- 
sion on Alcohol and Drug Abuse reported 
on studies dial showed dial people with a .08 
blood alcohol level were 3.5 times as likely 
to be involved in a crash and nearly twice as 
likely to die in a crash. MADD is fighting 
■^or even suicter laws including a 



Around the World 



The bill would also rexjuire that every- 
one arrested be videotaped so that the tape 
coufd be used as evidence in court. The 
battle lines have been drawn among diose 
for and agaiast diis proposed bill. Testi- 
mony before House committees has ah^eady 
begun. 



level of .04 for minors. 

As die House considers this bill, 
representatives are being flooded 
with evidence and proposals from 
= bodi sides. Several proposals in- 
volved with dus bill have already been 
dirown out by a House sub-committee, but 



.08, alcoholic fatalities increased by 7 per- 
cent. He said that if diis bill should pass it 

would simply be a "waste of law enforce- dial hasn't stopped MADD, which is still 

mcnt effort." fighting for much suicter laws dian Soudi 

Those in favor of the bill, including a Carolina currently has. The logistics of die 

very stfongconungeni from Modiers Against bill are stUl changing as is its fate, and die 

Drunk Driving (MADD), have argued that debate continues. 



Hampshire; 



by Ted Carmichael 
POLITICS EDITOR 




and 2.144 of those arc needed to get die 
nomination. 

Buchanan did much better than most 
As usual, die voters of New Hampshire people expected. He won 37 percent of die 
had a few surpnses for die presidential popular vote, and of die 1,105 republican 
candidates. At the nauon's first primary, delegates needed for die nomination, he has 
held on February 18, Paul Tsongas came 9 to Bush's 14. When addressing his sup- 
out ahead with 35 percent of die popular porters Tuesday night, Buchanan said, 
vote. And m die GOP, Buchanan 
surpassed expectations Dy imishing 
just 16 percentage points behind 
President Bush. 

Tsongas had been slowly build- 
ing up supptin over the past few 
weeks. According to one staff 
member, die "slow but steady" ap- 
proach is normal for one of his cam- 
paigns. He has mediodically worked 
on his name recognition, and 
struggled -not m vain- to improve 
his speaking abliliiy. In an inter 

view he jokingly remarked, "At die 

beginning, 1 was .sort of irritated dial 

no one bodiercd to look for dirt." 

Because of his win in New Hamp- 
shire, he is hopeful of receiving .some 

much needed publicity, but he will 

also be die focus of the prcss'sclosc 

scrutiny. 

The ex-Senauirs' biggest prob- 
lem, however, is going to be gelling 

votes in the Soudi, where he is rela- 
tively unknown. He dwsn'i have a 

very strong organization and, like 

most of the demiKratic candidates 

hasju.si aboul run out of money. Bill 

Clinton, on the odicr hand, is doing 

well in bodi departments, and is 

expected lo pick up a lot of voles on 

March 10, which is this year's "Su- 

perTuesday." Clinion was optimis- 
tic last wa;k, and with gmxl reason. 

Even though he recieved only 26 

percent of Ihe popular vole, he man 

aged lo pick up half of the iX'mo 

crane delegates m New Hampshire, lying 

Tsongas widi nine. Out of all the delegates 

commitied as of Sunday, Tsongas has only 

1 1 , while Clinton has 9(). Tom lUykin is in 

second widi 65, dianks pnmarily Ui his 

home slate ol Iowa. Ihere are a louU ot 

4,287 delegates for the DenuKralic party. 




(•eorgc Hush 



"What started as a lillle rebellion has turned 
into a lull Hedged revolulu^n." And later, he 
added, "We are going lo lake our parly 
back ..andlakeourcounu-y back." Although 
hard up for cash alter spending over two 
million dollars in New Hampshire, 
Buchanan's |X'ople are confident dial the 



money will keep up, especially in light of 
how well he has done in the first primary. 
Bush's people are not that worried, how- 
ever. New Hampshire is known for being 
radier unique in the way it votes, and die 
recession has done more damage diere than 
in most odier slates. Also, Bush has much 
stronger supply lines when it comes to funds, 
and his national campaign is more 
organized. And finally, if the 
country eases out of the recession 
this summer, as most economists 
predict, a lot of die pressure wUl be 
off Bush. 

The next few weeks will be very 
important in the Bush-Buchanan 
bailie. They are both concenu-aung 
on the South, where most of die 
pnmanes between now and "Super 
Tuesday" are. Last week the two 
spoke to crowds in Charleston that 
were less dian a block away, and 
they also plan to hit Georgia before 
the March 3 primary there. 
Buchanan may be in trouble here, 
where the recession is less severe, 
and where Bush is known to have a 
lot of support. According to one 
political analyst. Bush plans lo ap- 
peal to die stereotypical soudicm 
pau-iotism with many references to 
"Operation Desert Storm." Most 
imporianily diough, Bush plans on 
painting Buchanan as a "dangerous 
fringe " candidate, but without di- 
rect attacks that would give 
Buchanan more credibility. 

The Souih will also be an impor- 
umi battleground for die Demo- 
craLs. This will be die lest for 
Kerry. H;ukin, and Brown as diey 
scratch for funds diey'll nt^d to 
take diird pliKC. Clinton is ex 
peeled U) get a lot of support from 
this region, and according to Dr. 
Kenneth Orr. he may even drop by PC on 
his swing through South Carolina. As for 
Isongas. if he can last dirough the next few 
weeks, the campaigns will he^d back up 
North w here he generally has more support 
rhen we will see if he is able to "send 
Wa.shingion a mess;igo " 



pht>l<> 



Indianapolis, Ind. - 'Iron" Mike 
Tyson was found guilty of rape !md two 
counts of crimiffid sexual-deviaie conduct 
His accuser was Dcsiree Washington, a 
native of Coventry, Rho(fc Island, and a 
contestant in die 1991 Miss Black Amenca 
Pageant Sentencing is scheduled for 
March 27, but Tyson plans to appeal die 
decision. He has hired Harvard law pro- 
fessor Alan Dershowitz, who once repre- 
sented lelevangelist Jim Baker. 

AT&T has recendy unveiled its new 
VideoPhone 2500, a (kvicc diat comes 
with a tiny camera lens and color screen. 
Similar devices have existed for decades, 
but diis is the first diat doesn't need ex- 
pensive special equipment to wort. The 
Videophone u.ses new technology to work 
on standard telephone lines and transmits 
six images per seccHid (compared V) 30/ 
sec. for TV). It should be available in May 
of diis year , and IS expected to cost S 1 ,500. 

Milwaukee, Wb. - Jeffrey Dahmcr 
was found sane by a lO-to-2 jury verdict 
He has already pleaded guilty to the murder 
and dismemberment of 1 5 men and admit- 
ted to eating body parts and having sex 
widi samt of die ctupses. He faces a 
mandatory life-sentence for each kiHing. 



San Francisco, CaL - Taxi driver 
Charles Holk)m chased a mugger widi his 
cab and pinned him against d^ wall of a 
budding. The mugger, wlK)se leg was 
brdken during the citizen's arrest, was 
sentenced to 1 years for roU)eiy , but won 
a suit against Hdk>m say mg diat the cabby 
used excessive force. When word of the 
verdict got around, a local radio staticxi 
helped raise over $25,000 lo cover the 
expenses. Holland says he would do "ex- 
actly the same diing again." 

London, England - Last mondi John 
Major and Boris Yeltsin were surjmsed at 
die tardiness of dieir respective secretar- 
ies of defense, Tom King and Marshal 
Yevgeny. The excuse: They had burnt the 
midnight oil while partaking in a case of 
rare 1939 Crimean chamjragne. Major 
was not pleased at die bad focm, but 
Yeltsin, perhaps widi envy, exclaimed, 
"Good God! 1 diought all of dial vintage 
had been (hunk by Khrushchev!" 



Russia - YclLsm's jump to a market 
econcxny is starling to show some signs of 
success as food finds its way to die mar- 
ketplace. When dvc price supports for all 
goods were removed a few months ago, 
die counuy was shocked when prices in- 
creased by as much as 20 pwccnt. Now 
diey seem to be levchng off, and in some 
cases pnccs arc even going down. One of 
the major factors in dns ffend is the 
suengthcnmg of the ruble. The Central 
Bank of Russia has reduced die money 
supply by 30 percent, and foreign inves- 
tors arc snatching up mblcs in order to 
invest in slate-owned prttpcrties. However, 
the production and employment tosses 
may prove to be too much to overcome, 
and the Russian people still have a long 
way to go 






CAMPUS & CLUBS 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



7 



FEATURES 



Pi Kappa Phi 

liie brothers of Pi Kappa Phi welcome 
all our new officers, associate members, and 
social affiliates! ! We would like to thank all 
our Rush Girls for their always appreciated 
sincere effort New officers are: Archon, 
Javan Jordan; Vice -Archon, Reggie Batson; 
Treasurer, Chris Garrett; Secretary, Tyler 
Jones; Warden, Ed Kirkland; Historian, 
David Dixon; Chaplain, BJ Cottrell; 
P.U.S.H. Chairman, Stanton Smith; and 
Social Chairman, Daniel Eyerly. Associate 
Members: John Demyan, Matt Glenn, David 
Grieve, Jason Humphries, Mark Hunt, Dave 
Lewis. Rob MacCredie, Chad McGaha, Ben 
Medley, Dean Sheom, Craig Streemian, 
Chris Thomas, Spenser Treadwell, and 
Daniel Webb. Our three new social affili- 
ates are Steve Ellis, Neely Loring, and Bill 
Wright. Tidy Bowl award goes to Spencer 
and Ben. Congratulations guys. You earned 
it! 

Last semester Beta Chapter had a really 
LETTERS, continued from page 3 



worthwhile Halloween party for the Whitien 
Center with the Zetas. We also raised $1700 
for P.U.S.H., our national outreach service 
project, with a scaffold sit and toll road. 
Good job Stanton! This semester we're 
looking forward to Roseball, Carolina Cup, 
P.U.S.H. Week, and I.M. swimming and 
Softball. We would like to congratulate all 
Greeks on their new prospective members! ! 



Can you give up GDH for a night? 

Want to give up .something for Lent? 
How about skipping supper one night to 
help feed the hungry? March 4 is Ash 
Wednesday, the beginning of Lent and the 
day picked for our campus to fast. A sign- 
up for students willing to skip supper in 
GDH on March 4 will be held through 
Friday. The list will be given to GDH and 
the money for your dinners after the fast will 
be sent to Oxfam America. 



Campolo to highlight SVS celebration 



Press Release 
CHAPLIN'S OFHCE 

Dr. Tony Campolo, 
who has been called one 
of the most dynamic 
speakers in the field of 
Christian service, will 
highlight Presbyterian 
College's year-long 25lh 
anniversary celebration of 
Student Volunteer Ser- 
vices. He will appear at 
1 1 :(X) am on March 1 7 in 
Bclk Auditorium. His 
presentation carries CEP 
credit. 

PC Chaplain Greg Henley says, "Tony 
Campolo graps your attention and will not 




Dr. Tony Cam 



let you go. You don't 
want to miss him. He is 
one of a kind." 

Dr. Campolo, pro- 
fessor of sociology at 
Eastern College in Penn- 
sylvania, will discuss the 
role of service in Kxlay's 
society. Campolo is the 
author of 14 books, in- 
cluding The Kingdom of 
Cod IS a Party. He is the 
founder of the Evangeli- 
cal Assocalion for the 
Promotion of Education - 
an organization which 
ministers to the social, economic, and 
spiritual needs of people in urban America 
and Third World countries. 



Dear Editor: 

As president of Students for Environ- 
mental Education (SEE) I am very happy to 
see some response to our overwhelming 
environmental jwoblems, not only on aglobal 
scale, but here at PC. However, 1 am dis- 
tressed to note the lack of knowledge PC 
students have about their opportunity to get 
out and do something. 

The "recent actions" the school has 
taken have overshadowed the fact that for 
the past two and a half years a small, but 
dedicated group, has carried out a successful 
recycling program in the women's dorms, 
and to date has collected over 1049 pounds 
of aluminum, not to mention the countless 
bags of paper, plastic, and glass. And with 
the formation of the recycling board and the 
support of the school. I am very happy to see 
this becoming a more comprehensive pro- 
gram. 

However, the issues go far beyond that 
On the subject of polystyrene. SEE hasuied 
to get itremoved from GDH and at one point 
we were under the impression it would no 
longer be ordered. Obviously that is not 
true, so we are continuing our efforts to stop 
its use, but it takes time and research. One 
way to let them know you don't want 
polystyrene is to just not use it. Bring your 
own cup or buy an Eco-mug that SEE is 
currently selling. 

SEE is also preparing to do an energy 
audit of the school. A study showed that 
over $1000 worth of heat is lost a year 
through the windows of Richardson alone. 
This audit will help ^ow ways PC can save 
some of that nuclear energy it uses. 

We have just begun work on a new 
project of ride-shanng. The basic idea is if 
two pcf^le are going to Atlanta for the 
weekend, instead of both driving, why not 
share the ride? 

And of course, SEE will be sponsoring 
another Earth L>ay in April. So, if you really 
want to get involved at the grassroots level 
and do something, I strongly encourage you 
to attend our meetings. Only with your help 
can we continue to clean up the envuon- 
ment. 

Sincerely, 
Katheryn Spearman 



Etear Editor: 

As an "ardent" feminist living within 
the PC community, I feel compelled to re- 
spond to the February 7 Ictter-to-thc-editor, 
written by Warren Blanchard. Although, 
passionate in its execution, point by point 
Warren shows that he has been blessed with 
a wonderfully sheltered life and is still in- 
nocent to the world around him. His obvi- 
ous anger and hurt are by-products of 
awakening and growth , and I applaud PC for 
pushing students to look around them and 
embrace the journey toward responsible 
adulthood. As rattled as Warren sounds, I 
would say that his journey has begun ... but 
on to the points in Warren's article which I 
will specifically address. 

Point I - It is interesting that a man- 
child would refer to a well-educated, well- 
traveled, mature woman as "ranting," "rav- 
ing," "disillusioned" and "disturbed." 
Murphy Davis has political and economic 
savvy achieved by jumping in the trenches 
without hesitation. She has returned with 
wounds, but not without strong and articu- 
late resolve. Her articles are published in 
highly respected journals, and she has an 
admirable reputation in the social justice 
arena. Of the two, Warren appears to be 
having the tantrum and he uses the dirty 
tacUcs of name-calling and intimidation in 
his arguments. 

Point 2 - Statistics of woman abuse 
cannot be qualified as "male bashing." Our 
society, as well as others, must admit to this 
epidemic problem if we are to move toward 
a truely equitable scKiety. I lis a fact that one 
out every two women will experience some 
form of violence within a love relationship 
during their life. Forty two percent will be 
pregnant at the time of the attack. Twenty- 
five percent of women will be sexually 
assualted. One of every four female chil- 
dren and one out of ten male children arc 
sexually abused, ninty-ninc percent of their 
abusers are male. Contrary to our sicroty pe, 
women and children comprise a large seg- 
ment of the homeless population iuid over 
half of the families in poverty arc female 
headed. The insidiousness of sexist adver- 
tising, visual violence against women on 
TV and screen, sexist and rat ist jokes, sexual 
harassment, cat calls from dorm windows, 



etc., serve to undermine women in cvcr>' 
facet of their lives. These problems are 
systemic and ideological and cannot be re- 
duced to simply the "right choice of male." 
I suggcsllhaiWarrcnvisii the Lauren County 
Safe Home or one of the other shelters 
across the stale where more are turned away 
than can be accommodated. 

Point 3 - Radical feminists arc mam 
stream women and men. The radical femi- 
nists I know include a doctor's wife wiih 
eight children, a female Presbyterian min- 
ister, a farmer, a teacher, a college professor, 
a lawyer, a painter, a housewife, etc., ad 
infinitum. We are nol despised, nor do we 
despise. We are loved by our neighbors, our 
children, our parents, our church, our part- 
ners. And, it is our love for our families, our 
children, our counu^ and our world thai 
spurs us to challenge our reality, and to 
change it Feminism is not a slate of being, 
but rather a series of intentional actions, the 
purpose of being to expose and challenge 
the crippling effects of our parliarchal way 
of life. We work to envision and create new 
communities that do not need the Ux)ls of 
woman abuse, homophobia, militarism, hi 
erarchy or racism. I will concede that some 
in our society are wary of feminists baause 
they do indeed actively work for and de- 
mand change. Change may be frightening, 
but that docs not make the need for change 
any tess. And I wonder how Warren got the 
notion that he was qualified U) speak for the 
wishes of the "average American woman .'" 
This IS, case in point, one of the rubs ol 
women today - uninformed males aiiempi- 
ing to speak for females as to what they 
need, want, care about, should kx)k like, 
should act like. Warren should roali/e that 
women are refusing to buy that old bag of 
goods, that we aren'iaverage.buiexuaordi- 
nary, and that we demand the nghi to speak 
for ourselves. 

Point 4 - 1 gram Warren his adulauon of 
Sam Walton as the epitome of the American 
dream 'Hial he is. But Warren is meshing 
the Amerian dream, capitalism and nation 
alism with Christianity. Although we lout 
thai our counU7 was grounded on Christian 
principles, those principles were subjective 
then and we have diluted and wiu^Kd ihctn 
ever since. The "American Way" is nol the 
"Christian Way." Munihv Davis, as a 



Chrisiian Icminisi, was offering a Christian 
cniique of our economic dilcma which is far 
more complicated than simply labeling the 
"isms." (By the way, all the "i.sms" are 
patriarchal, so feminists are not inlerested in 
using ihcm as models.) The impact of ihc 
tight concentration of wealth and power on 
women and children worldwide is devas- 
tating. Changing the economic systems of 
the world to a new order, not an old, pam- 
aahal order, is the teminist's greatest chal- 
lenge. 

Point 5 - 1 would gue.ss ihaieven Murphy 
has a TV But we must understand that the 
media is a brainwashing t(X)l. We think it is 
entertainment, and we demand to have it 
But think about it - where do we get our 
images of the "average Amencan woman," 
or of war as glory, or of sexuality, or of 
minorities, or of the world? I challenge 
Warren to think about this more than he has. 
How can the masses overcome this bom- 
bardment of stereotyping and manipulation 
if we believe it all to be Uue. if we don't open 
a criucal eye, if wc aren't outraged at what 
we are given as the "way it is?" I encourage 
all at K\ and especially Warren, to step 
down from their "Ivory Tower" and lcK)k at 
our world as it really is. Share someone 
else's pain, suffering, fear or fmstraiion. 
Then, after the sh(x:k, pick yourselves up 
and work loudly, unllmthingly and without 
excuses U)ward a world society based on 
Christian jusuce This is the Chnsuan femi- 
nist message of Murphy Davis. 

Sincerely, 

Janet I.. Henley, Director 

Trinity Resource Center 



Due to lack of space, we were 
unable to print all of the letters 
to the editor. We want to thank 
everyone who submitted let- 
ters, and we are sorry if yours 
was not printed. We will put 
the remaining letters in the 
next issue. 

— - The Blue Stocking 



Chinese professor experiences American college life 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

FEATURES EDITOR 

You've probably seen him in the halls 
of Neville or riding his bike through campus 
and mistaken him for a student. His English 
IS better than that of most Americans, and 
with his amiable smile and sense of humor, 
he docs indeed seem to meld into the atmo- 
sphere of PC. 

Profes.sor Jiang Chengzhong is this 
year's visiting professor of Chinese, spon- 
sored by the International Christian Youth 
Exchange. The program was initialed with 
the vision of giving Chinese professors the 
opportunity to spend an extended amount of 
time in America. 

Professor Jiang had hopes of being se- 
lected one day. but the suspension of the 
program during the Tiananmen Square 
episode made his expectations seemingly 
unrealistic. When he met Dr. Bumside at his 
own school in China la.st spring, however, 
he learned that the program had been re- 
miiated. Bumside recommended Jiang and 
another of his colleagues to the sekxuon 
board, setting the wheels in motion, and 
Jiang seized the coveted opportunity. 

In keeping with the norm of Chine.se 
culture, program participants do not select 
their locauon in the United Stales. "It is ju.sl 
a privilege U) be able to come anywhere in 
America; we don't care where," explains 
Jiang. Nevertheless, il was quite a shock 
when he arrived on a typical autumn day in 
Clinton while the student body was on Fall 
Break. 

Profes.sor Jiang comes from the busUing 
city of Changchun (population 2 million). 
While he admits that he would have pre- 
ferred to experience the Amencan lifestyles 
in a city more like his own (New York, San 
Franc Lso, Washington), he has been very 
happy at PC. "PC is more than I expected. 
In China, we have no lawns on our cam- 
puses. And the lake is wonderful. I have 
been very impressed," he says. 

The beauty of the surroundings is not 



the only aspect of PC that has impressed 
Professor Jiang. He has observed several 
marked differences in the academic system 
as well. He has taught English Listening 
Comprehension at Changchun University 
for five years and admits that, although 
Americans may be spoiled by our system, he 
much prefers it 

"In China, all of the professors in a 
particulardepartmentshareone office. They 
have one comer of a desk to put their books 
on, if they're lucky." he explains. American 
students (at least at PC) also have the advan- 
tage of going back lo a professor's office for 
help or just to talk after class. But in China, 
"After class, the professor may have one c up 
of coffee in his office. Then he goes home." 
Jiang has observed some positive and 
some negative aspects of American culture. 
He is particularly disturbed by the massive 
amounts of mindless waste Americans 
commit, especially of food and paper. 

When he is not teaching or challenging 
PC's Ping-Pong King (Bumside) loa match, 
ProfessorJiang enjoys watching uncensored 
news on the television or reading periodi- 
cals. And if you are really lucky, you might 
catch him square dancing or playing Simon 
and Garfunkel on his guitar. 

Jiang also has been attending the 
Meth(xlisi Chuch with the Bumsides and 
had an opportunity to meet St. Nick there 
this Christmas. He spent most of the 
Christmas break with the other ICYE par- 
ticipants in Charlotte, where he took in a 
Charlotte Hwnets game. 

Maybe it is Uiie that one can only see an 
accurate picture of America through the 
eyes of a non-Amencan. And maybe it is 
also u^e that it would benefit us greatly to 
adopt that same perspective. To Professor 
Jiang. Amenca represents a country of 
abundance md beauty, yet a country that 
cannot fully appreciate and respect its fa- 
cilities and resources. To him, America 
represents an incredible opportunity to leam, 
discuss,challenge,andexpenenceahfestyle 
quite different from his own. 




PC's b<aiitir«l canpys is what Professor Jiaag loves abo^t Aaerica. 



Students get a taste of the 'reign of God' by going to Honduras 



by Camisha Clarke 
STAFF WRITER 

Consider for a moment what 
you are doing for spring break. 
Does your respon.sc sound famil- 
iar to what most college students 
do during spring break? Perhaps 
you are doing something sunilar to 
the eight PC students. Rev. Greg 
Henley, Chaplain, and Dr. Charles 
McKelvey, associate professor of 

Semiology, who have chosen to .* i. , 

spend their spring break in Honduras as a Dr. Charles McKelvey in Honduras last 
central element of the new course. Third 
World Experience and Semmar.' International. Following the u-ip the group 

Since the 1970's mission Uips during reflected upon their concerns for the Third 
spring break have been sjionsored by the World counuies and attempted to under- 
Student Volunteer Services, usually to stand the conditions behind poverty. 






mission sites in the United Stales, but over 
the years the idea hasevol ved into a broader 
learning experience. In March of 1^89. 
Henley designed an annual one-hour elec- 
tive religion uavel seminar course that led 
eight students and two professors to a small 
village in the Dominican Republic where 
they were hosted by Habitat for Humanity 



Continuing the tradition with more 
concrete objecu ves, Henley and McKelvey 
arc jointly teaching Third World Experi- 
ence and Seminar so that students may 
engage in "critical thinking about them- 
selves, the world, their values, their culture, 
and their faith convictions" according to 
Henley. Offering a three-hour course this 



spring. 

photo courtesy ofLeJeanna Maddox 
year, as opposed to the one-hour credit in 
the past, IS designed to give tbe students 
more time for preparation and discussion 
before and after the mission tnp dunng 
spring break. Presently, there is a cla.ss 
variety of eight students enrolled in this 
course. Senior Kelli Lester says, "1 think it 
would be a great learning experience to see 
how our government affects other coun- 
u-ies" Indeed, a mission trip to Honduras 
will provide a ta.stc of the reign of God for 
First World Christians relating to the poor 



Chnsuans of tl« Third World for 
eight days. 

Although this is nol the first 
mission uip for freshman Kalher- 
ine Wilkerson, she is mterested m 
"broadenmg my perspecive on life" 
by comparmg and contrasting the 
causes of poverty in the Third 
World and m the United States, 
She says, "I think I'll leam nol to 
lake things for granted." 

Hosted by the Christian Com- 
mission for Development, which 
sponsors many programs seeking to un- 
prove the lives of Hondurans, and spon- 
sored in pan by the Prcsbytenan Church 
(USA), this u-ip IS offering these students a 
positive learning experience about poverty 
and the Third Worid that they will probably 
never have in North Amenca. What better 
way IS there to build relalion.ships with 
Hondurans? Henley has staled with enthu- 
sia.sm, "My goal is that students who take 
this course will be u-ansformcd by their 
expenence to work for a more just and 
humane community." 



ENVIRONMENT 



8 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



Ozone depletion is worse than expected 



By Ted Camiichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 



NASA, in conjunclkn with scientists 

from other institutions, announced their 
findings on the ozone layer, which were 
much worse than anyone expected. It has 
already been shown thai the number of ozone 
molecules (03) in nouch of the northern 
hemisphere have declined 4 paT:ent to 8 
percent over the last decade. Last month 
however, an orbiting saieOiie and a modi- 
fied spy plane recorded extremely high lev- 
els of chlorine monoxide (CIO), a by-prod- 
uct that forms when Chlorofluorocarbons 
(CFCs) break down the 03 molecules. The 
new data implies that the ozone layer could 
be temporarily depleted by as much as 40 
percent late this winter aid in early spring 
over northern parts of Ihe U.S., Canada, 
Eun^, and Russia. This is comparable to 
Ihe "hole" recorded Ofver Aniartica a few 
years ago, which wasa SOpercent depletion. 
Chlorine atoms oiginaie in the CFCs. 
These atoms strip away one of the oxygen 
atoms from the 03 and form a normal oxy- 
gen molecule (02) and a CK) molecule. 



Another oxygen atom then combines with 
the CIO to form a new 02 molecule and re- 
lease the chlorine atom. The clonne is then 




able to continue breaking apart more ozone 

molecules. One atom of clorine is estimated 

to destroy up to 100,000 molecules of ozone. 

As the ozone layer is deplealcd, more 



^ 



Eco-Mugs 
are a success 



By Heather Moncrief 

ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 



The sell of Eco-Mugs by Students for Environmental 
Education has proven successful. In less than one week of 
their arrival, the 500 mugs ordered were sold. The response 
has been overwhelming. Eco-Mugs can be seen all over 
Clinton, from GDH to Subway. The Dusinesses participating 
in this program have been extremely supportive. No problems 
have arisen, except for the lack of more mugs to sell. To solve 
this problem, SEE has placed a second order. This order will 
arrive after spring break. 

These 20 ounce insulated beverage containers hold both 
hot and cold drink. The project is an anempt to cut down on 
solid waste and to give uDH a reason to stop ordering 
polystyrene. Not only will purchasers be doing tneir part in 
our waste problem, but they will also receive discounts at 
certain local restaurants when using their mugs in place of 
nonreusable cups. These mugs will be on sale again for only 
$3.00 in GDH in late March. 



ulu^violet light rays peneu^te the su^to- 
sphere and reach the earth. These rays can 
be very harmful to the population below. 
UV light has been conecicd to many forms 
of skin cancer as well as cataracts in the 
eyes. In Australia, there has been a three- 
fold increase m the number of skin cancers, 
and the gpvemmcni issues warnings when 
UV levels are expected to be high. What's 
more, UV radiation can interfere with pho- 
tosynthesis causing low crop ycilds, and 
can also kill phytoplankton, which is at the 
beginning of the food chain. Even the 
weather patterns can be affected. When 03 
absorbs UV light, heat is generated which 
helps crcaic su^aiospheric winds. With the 
absence of some of that heat, the whole 
temperature structure of the stratosphere is 
changed. 

An intemaiional treaty signed two years 
ago requires a total phaseout of CFCs by the 
year 200O. This new information, however, 
induced nsmy countries to call for an faster 
timetable. Germany has pledged to stop 
CFC production by 1995, and President 
Bush has said that the U.S. will do the same. 
An international fund will also be set up to 



help poorer counuies, such as China and 
India, to phase out their use of CFCs. 

The downside to all this action is that it 
probably won't do any good in the near 
fuUirc. Researchers believe that, even if all 
CFC production were stopped uxlay, levels 
of chlorine would continue to rise for at least 
a decade. This is because CFCs can last for 
100 years or more, and natural levels will 
not return for at least a century. 

Perhaps the lesson to be learned from this 
IS to not expose the earth lo such huge 
experiments when the consequences are un- 
known. The possible danger lo the ozone 
layer was first reported m 1974, but it look 
hard evidence lo get the world moving, after 
the damage was done. Prcdicuons of global 
warming are largely ignored because they 
cannot be proven, and the amount of carbon 
dioxide in the atmosphere has increa.sed 25 
percent due to man's tampering. Is it not 
reckless to conunue acting as we do when 
we don't know what the effects will be? Is 
it not frightening to consider what conse- 
quences It may be too lale to avoid? 



VOTE 

SGA ELECTIONS 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 




lAKi: Tins COUPON 

ANDGHTAI'RliK 

DliSSBRT WITH YOUR MKAI. AT 



•I 






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



ENVIRONMENT 



PC trash items are 
analyzed by SEE 

by Kathryn Spearman 

GUEST WRITER 

Unfortunately, Amenca has become a ihrow-away society, dependent on disposable 
products. On January 30, Siudenisfor Environmental Education depicted this problem by 
finding out what percentage of FYcsbylcnan College's trash is recyclable. At 7:.30 a.m. with 
the assistance of the maintenance department, SEE started digging through the school's 
trash. When it was all over, they found thai based on volume 4()?c of the trash was recyclable. 

There is me*ins for a change in these figures. With the implementation of the PC 
recycling program, it is easier for all to recycle. SEE encourages everyone to do his or her 
part and recycle. 




Student trash fills the "brndnil on the lawn. 







i 



Piles of bags display the amount of daily waste on our campus. 







y 



«.th. 



* > 2 ^ i* '• 









f***^ 



^, f 




Margaret Barfield, a member of SEE, separates aluminum cans for recydfaig. 




Recyclable cardboard made up a larfte portion of the trash analyMtf . 



SPORTS 



10 



FlUDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



Nelson plays crucial role in PC athletics 



by Everett Catts 

STAFF WRITER 

Anyone who is associated with Pres- 
byterian College athletics knows Nelson 
Jones. Although Nelson is an important 
figure to deal with in the athlectic pro- 
gram, if you spend a great deal of time in 
his office something must be wrong 
with you. The reason being is that 
Nelson Jones is PC's head athletic 
trainer. His job is crucial to all of PC's 
athletic programs. Keeping athletes from 
injury and helping them to quickly re- 
cover from injuries is what Nelson does. 

Jones came to PC in the summer of 
1986, after graduating from East Ten- 
nessee State University in 1983 and 
completing two years of graduate school 
atFurmaninl985. During his time as an 
essential part of the PC athletic machin- 
ery. Nelson has brought about many 
important changes. Upon his arrival at 
PC, the athletic department did not have 
a training room at all. Nelson has been 
able to establish a training room that is 
outstanding for any small school and 
among the best and biggest in the South 
Atlantic Conference. PC's training room 
is now equiped with the latest in teatment 
resources. Nelson pointed out that, "The 
facilities we have are essential to give 
the athletes the best care possible." 

Nelson Jones is highly respected by 
both the athletes and the coaches be- 
cause of his work ethic. Be it the day of 
a practice or a game. Nelson and his 
student-trainers are the first to arrive 
and the last to leave on a regular day. 

•Weare responsible for about 260 



athletes, and we cover their health and 
welfare," stated Jones. "And when they 
do get hurt, we're responsible for get- 
ting them back on the playing field as 
quickly and safely as possible." 

The number one goal of Nelson and 
his staff is the prevention of injury. He 
does this by planning conditioning pro- 
grams to suit the demands the sport will 
have on the athletes playing that sport. 
Nelson and his assisstants implement 
taping, bracing, and most importantly 
stretching to further prevent injury to 
PC's athletes. With application of ice 
and heat and with use of whirlp(X)ls, 
ultrasounds, and electrostimulation, in- 
juries are treated. 

Nelson Jones gives a great deal of 
credit to his student-trainers. T^ey are 
junior Aaron Boggs, sophomore Everett 
CatLs, freshmen Anne Dyer and Stacey 
Lewellyn, and senior Marcus Holiday. 
He hand picks the trainers from the 
applications sent to PC for admission. 
Tlie five trainers on Nelson's staff help 
him stay organized and prepared to deal 
with any situation that may arise. 

The secret to Nelson Jones' success 
is probably that all of PC's athletes tmst 
him and realize his desire to help them is 
genuine. 

'To be a successful trainer," said Jones, 
"you have to be able to get along with 
people. If you U7 to get to know the 
athletes, it makes it a lot easier to deal 
with their problems. I respect the ath- 
letes here not just because they are stu- 
dents first and athletes second, but be- 
cause they're ea.sy to get along with 





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



11 



SPORTS 



Men's basketball finishes second in the SAC - 8 



by Everette Catts 

STAFF WRITER 

With home wins over Wingale, Mars 
Hill.Ncwbcn7, and LenoBT-Rhync, the Blue 
Hcwe Men's Basketball Team fmished with 
a 4-1 record in the final liree weeks of the 
regular season. PC cru.'Acd Wingale on 
February 12, 83-54. The Blue Hose were 
without Head Coach Gregg Nibcrt; never- 
tholcf-s Assistant Coach Dm Numcry heiKlcd 
K"s squad ma huge victory. Bret Jones' 29 
poiK-s led the Blue Hose, who had the lead 
forihe enure game. 

On February 15, at Canon-Newman, 
PC suffered us only loss of its last three 
wccLs of the regular sea.«n, a 65-<)4 over- 
time thriller. In the game,. «cnior Scoti Cox 
stoeed the l(XK)th pomt of his career al PC. 
On Fcbmary 17, the Bl« Hose defeated 



Newberry, 84-69, shooting 70 percent fiwn 
the field. Leading PC again was junior Bret 
Jones, who had 25 points. The Blue Hose 
beat Mars Hill on February 19, a game in 
which Jones reached the lOOO-poini career 
sconng mark also. Lcnoir-Rhyne was PC's 
next victim; an 80-65 win on February 22 
put the Blue Hose in a three way tie vmh 
Lenoir-Rhyne and Elon for second place in 
the SAC-8. 

Going into the SAC-8 Tournament in 
Catawba, the Blue Hose are 16-12 overall, 
with an 8-6 conference record. Despite 
being ranked second in the conference, PC 
IS seeded fixirih in the loumameniand played 
Catawba in the opening round yesterday. 
With a win yesterday, the Blue Hose will 
play the winner of the Gardner-Webb vs. 
Mars Hill game tonight at 8:00. 



Women's and men's tennis teams begin season 



bv Amanda Bowers 
STAFT- WRITER 

Women's Tennis 

It's a little knowni fact that PC's 
women's tennis team has just begun 
their 1992 sea.son ranked 16th in the 
nation. With the same team returning 
from last year, the wo«cn liave their 
sights set on winning Ac district and 
goit^ to the nationals. The team has 
opened their season 
with a 7-2 victory 
overFrancis Marion 
and a 5-4 win over 
Coastal Camlina. 

The Lady Blue 
Hose started their 
spring season prac- 
tice on January 1 3. 
They have, how- 
ever, been practic- 
ing all year, with a 
short break in No- 
vember and Decem- 
ber Coach IX>nna Arnold says she 
expectsatoughschedulelhisyear. -Hiree 
of the teams they play - Mobile, Elon. 
and Berry - are ranked in the top ten 
nationally. Coach Arnold feels the 
team "s strongest compctiuon m die con- 
ference will come from Elon. 

The expcnence of this returning 
team will help. Coach Arnold says, 
wc get into a tight situation, we will 
know htiw to handle it better." It the 
team can win the distnct this year, they 
will automatically qualify for the na- 
tionals this summer. 

Men's Tennis 

The mens tennis team opened their 
spring season February 14 with a 6-1 




loss to Funnan. Although they suffered 
two more loses over the weekend to 
Woffoid and the College of Charleston. 
Coach Bobby McKee said he was very 
plea.sed with everyone's perfonnance. 
He especially commended the play of 
Mallory McRae and Matthew Gmhn. 

The men went into thi s sea.st)n ranked 
14lh in the country in the NAIA. Their 
goal IS to make it to the National Tour- 
nament. They have 
already secured at 
least a tie for the 
conference title by 
winning six confer- 
ence games this 
past fall. The only 
thing standing in 
Iheir way is a win 
over Carson- 
Newman, a team 
they beat last year. 

Coach McKee says 
that this year's team should benefit from 
Its depth "We are much stronger than 
last year." he said. "Wc are way ahead 
of my schedule." 

The number one singles player for 
the Blue Hose is Mallory McRae. fol- 
lowed by number two Scott Ambrx)se. 
number three Mark Nccaise, number 
four Sentre Smith, and number five 
Matthew Gnilm. Seniora are Smith, 
Chns Gay, and Gmhn. who is also the 
team captain. 

The team's losses in their first tew 
matches this season arc no indication of 
theirqualityofplay. Accottlmg to C oach 
McKee. this is the toughest schedule in 
five years, and his team has been play- 
ing "good tennis " 




Kati« Lockwood jumps to score for PC. 



pholo courusy of David Hibbard 






EAT IN - CARRY OUT - DELIVERY 

$QQPT77 A SPECIAL 



t 




Any One 

Medium Specialty Pizza 

W)iW2t j_ _ -.» Choose From 

4lut. ONLY:t> .y y :---„, 

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With Purchase Of Another Medium 
Specialty Pizza at Regular Price. 

Not good with any other coupon offer or PC. discount. 

One coupon per party per visit at the Clmton Pizza Hut only. 

Must present coupon with purchase. 




ENTERTAINMENT 



12 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1992 



Wind Ensemble presents Winter Concert 



By Angle Rkhardsoo 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

On February 25, 1992, the Presbyterian 
College Wind Ensemble presented the an- 
nual Winter Concert in Belk Auditorium. 
The ensemble played a variety of selections, 
including a concen suite from the film 
"Dances With Wolves," arranged by Jay 
Bocc(A; "The Stars and Stripes Forever," 
and'TheBlack Horse Troop" by John Phillip 
Sousa; and "My Heart Is Filled With 
Longing" by Johann Sebastian Bach. 

Dr. Orval Oleson directs the 40 students 
and one faculty member who play various 
percussion, woodwind, and brass instru- 
ments. From Hollywood film music to 
patriotic marches, the ensemble had some- 
thing to offer everyone. 'The Black Horse 
Troop," written for the Cleveland, Ohio 
National Guard Calvary by John Phillip 



Sousa is a high spirited march. It was first 
performed in October 1925 while the troop 
rode onto stage and stood behind the band. 
"Slava!" is Leonard Bernstein's tribute to 
Mstislav Rostropovich, the name means 
glory, but it was also Rosu^opovich's nick- 
name. The "Dances With Wolves" concen 
suite includes: the main theme, Looks Like 
a Suicide; the John Dunbar Theme; Journey 
to Fort Sedgcwick; Pawnee Attack; the Love 
Theme; and the Buffalo Hunt. The concert 
concluded with Bach's "Passion Chorale" 
as arranged by Alfred Reed and Sousa 's 
patriotic "The Stars and Su-ipes Forever." 
Three concerts are presented annually by 
the Presbyterian College Wind Ensemble. 
The next concert will be the Spring POPS 
concert planned for April 28, 1992. For 
more information, contact the Presbyterian 
College music department at 833-8470. 




The comedian Carrot Top will be performing in Springs Campus 
Center on March 4 at 8:00 p.m. 



file photo 



PC Faculty Plan Exhibit, Gallery Talk 



News Release 

CLINTON, S. C, - Members of the 
Presbyterian College art department hosted 
an art exhibit and gallery talk at 7 p.m. on 
Thursday, February 20 in the Thomason 
Library Auditorium. Included in the show 
were paintings and photographs by Dr. Bob 
Hild, Mr. Mark Anderson, Ms. Diana 
Olencki, and Mr. Blake Pray tor, whose works 
were displayed and discussed. 

Dr. Hild presented acombination slide 
.show and lecture about his conuibutions to 
the exhibit. He addressed the origin of his 
work, and his slide show consisted of the 
"images that led to the images" in the show. 

Anderson, however, had a more spe- 



cific topic to address. He received a grant 
through the college that allowed him to 
travel the east coast, studying different land- 
scapes along the way. He began his journey 
in Edislo Island and gradually worked his 
way up the eastern seaboard, before moving 
inland to visit a Monet exhibit in Chicago. 
His two-month excursion ended m the 
Smoky Mountains. Mr. Anderson recalled 
the events and highlights of his trip during 
the gallery talk. 

There was a short reception, begin- 
ning at 6:30 p.m., prior to the program. The 
gallery talk began at 7 p.m. Both the reception 
and the gallery talk were open to the public 
at no cost. 




Dr. Gaines sings the lead "Trouble" for the hit production Broadway Cabaret. 

Broadway Cabaret a 'hit' 



By Cher Fulbright 

STAFF WRITER 

On Saturday, February 15 and Sunday, 
February 16, the PC chou^ performed yet 
another wonderful show - this time it was 
the Broadway Cabaret The show opened 
with "Everything'sComing Up Rose.s" from 
the Broadway show "Gypsy." Then, for the 
next 55 minutes, the choir and individual 
singers sang tunes from such shows as 
"Ki.ss Me Kate," "Oh Broadway ,""lnto the 
Woods," and "The King and I." 

Memorable performances of the 
Broadway Cabaret included Choral Direc- 
tor Dr. Charles Gaines' rendition of Harold 



Hill singing "Trouble" from 'The Music 
Man," and the scenes of Scotland shown 
while the choir sang tunes from 
"Bngad{X)n." The audience also loved the 
tap dancing of Kelly Magee while the choir 
sang .songs from "Oh Broadway." 

The Broadway Cabaret ended with 
favorites like "Grease," "You're the One 
That I Want," and "We Go Together" from 
the hit 1972 Broadway show "Grea.se." 

Attendance for both Saturday night 
and Sunday afternoon was good, and stu- 
dents who elected not U) attend this CEP 
event missed an excellent performance by 
the choir. 




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THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVl Number 10 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. South Carolina 29325 



mi 

Fndav. March 27, -W^ 



Dr. Dean Thompson chosen PC Professor of the Year 



by Paul Atkinson 

NEWS EDITOR 

When a professor daily wears suspend- 
ers and a bow lie, you know one of two 
things: cither he is a cultivated gentleman, 
or he has a passion for detail - Dr. H. Dean 
Thompson is both. 

He is known by some as Dr. D<x)m 
because of his generous use of red ink on his 
student's essays, but most tend to think of 
hirn in a different light. During an average 
weekday aliem(K)n, a small gathering of 
students usually crowds around his d(X)r in 
the hallway, waiting to speak with him. 
Sometimes they are there with a question 
about his class, but more olicn they come 
just to sit and tiilk, taking advantage of Dr. 
Thompson's willingness to communicate. 

"Getung to know people by teaching 
them IS a reward in itself," Thompson ex- 
plains while touching up the paint on a 
d(,x)rlrame in his house. "1 thrive on watch- 
ing students blossom and helping them in 
their limes of need 

When Thompson f-cgaii leaching al PC 
in 19HH, he brought with him his love of 
learning and the desire to spread his appre- 
ciation for literature. One of Thompson's 
first students at PC, Mike I^arlmg, says of 
him, "He gives all of himself toothers for the 
sake of learning itself, and without that, 1 
wouldn't have the interest in literature that 1 
havctcKlay" 

When asked of his reaction about being 
named Professor of the Yeiir, Thompson 
slops painung and steps forward, lectunng 
with his brush. "This award says much more 
about my department than w hat it says about 
me. 1 have to teach well just toket*p up with 
my colleagues." He leans back against a 
stepladder and winces. "In teaching 1 live 
with a constant sense of failure, bin I siick 



with It because who knows, maybe next 
semester 1 will be more satisfied." 

"He has a profound commitment to his 
stucknLs, and he pushes them to the fullest 
extent because he truly cares for and loves 
them," Dr. Richard Baker remarks. 

Who'' Dr. D(K)m? How can a man 
greet such a title with a full grin* Well, not 
everyone has such a sense of humor - it is 
nearly impossible to keep a suaighi face 
during one of his stones or jokes - but that 
shot of joy that he attempts to deliver to his 
students every day disunguishes him fmm 
all others. 

Thompson, however, argues thai he 
should nol be viewed diflerenily from other 
profes.sors at PC He says, "My profession is 
full of peaccK'ks - people who are consumed 
by the weightof their egos, who live only for 
the glorification of their names. They are 
charlatiins, I(H)1s, and jackasses. I saw right 
away that if 1 wanted to teach, I'd have to 
give my whole life to il I have never seen a 
more dedicated group of teachers than are 
present here. Tliat's why I came to Presby- 
terian College: 1 have never seen a p^uicixk 
on this facult>. 

Thompson's lack of selfishness is what 
makes him so apfK'aling as a teacher and a 
friend. Ihe essence of his values resonate 
through his lonsiancy (^t ho|x\ joy, and 
passion. 

His philosophy can be seen in all he 

dlK'S. 

Betore ciimpleting ihe touch-up paint 
ing on the dixutrame with a long, patient 
line of paint, Thom|)son pauses and sighs. 
"People will never notice this," he begins, 
"but 1 w ill . , and that makes it all worth- 
while ■" 

\Se have noiKcd, Dr Thompson, and 
we celebrate von in vour recognition 







phcAo by Steve Oweni 

Dr. Thompson instructs one of his English clas.ses on the front steps of Neville Hall 
1 hompson vvas recently selected as PC Professor of the Year. 



Fight erupts at Alpha Sigma Phi house 



by Jason West 

MANAC5INCJ EDITOR 

Another altercation cxcurcd al Fra- 
ternity Court ihis past weekend. On 
Sunday morning at around \1:M\ a 
fight broke out at the Alpha Sigma Phi 
house, This nuikcs for the third violent 
incident al Fraiemily Court within the 
past two months 

According lo a staicnieni prepared 
by the Brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi, the 
fraternily was sponsoring a mixer with 
the Social Club, which is primarily a 
niinority sUulenlorgani/alion. ReiH>rt- 
ediy. Tim Haskms, a non-siudeni and 
umnviied guest, started the altercation 
by shouting racial slurs at Ivm leaks, a 



PL juiuui. and oiliei guests of lire liaicr- 
nily. Afterwards, a I ighi erupted. Haskms 
is a 2 1 year-old w hue male and a resident 
of Caldwell Street in Clinton. 

Public Safety was called by mem- 
bers c>f the fraiernity. I'ptni iirrival. Of- 
ficer Ray Hurley arrested Haskms and 
charged him with public disorderly con- 
duct. The incident report filed on the 
matter showed that Haskms had been 
drinking alcohol. Hurley also re|Mrted 
that Haskms attempted lo hii him. 

On Monday, Haskms was found 
guilty by a Clinion magistrate of disor 
derly conduct and lined $248 PC Public 
Saleiy Cliief Orey Mayson also placed a 
trespass warning on Haskms. which b;tfs 
him from any activity on the PC campus. 



In addition, Eeakes refxnlcd to Pub- 
lic Safety tlial Haskms had earlier left 
messages on his answering machine that 
were "threats against him." Mayson 
reports that the lape with the messages 
on It have been taken as evidence and an 
invesigation into the matter is continu- 
ing. Mayson says that other charges 
against Haskms are pt)ssible. 

Mayson points out that this pariicu 
lar incident is somewhat different from 
past altercations at Fraternity Court. 'In 
this instance, wc are dealing with a local 
elemcni The person involved was defi- 
nitely a red neck type person," said 
Mayson. If the lx)y had nol been drink- 
ing, this situation might not have taken 



Reservation deposit due 

Press Release 

The office of the Business Managerand 
Treasurer reminds all PC students wlwplan 
to return next year that a space reservauon 
deposit of $2()0 must be submitted to the 
Cashier by May 1,1992. 

According to Skip Zubrtxl, business 
manager, if a student has not paid tiK deposit 
by May 1 , he or she will be dropped from 
class rolls for the fall term and w ill als(i lose 
his or her .space in college housing. 

The space reservation deposit is re- 
fundable until May 1 If a. student withdraws 
or decides to move off campus alter thai 
dale, the dejx>sit is lorfeited. 

The space rescrvauon deposit is not an 
extra aadcmic fee. Instead, iiwill applv 
against a student's fall semester charges. 



EDITORIAL 



l-RIDAY. MARCH 27, 1992 



Xn !Remembrance. . . 

Ben Hay Hammel 




Ben Hay Hammct, retired vice presi- 
dent for college relations at Presbyterian 
College, died February 24, 1992. at his 
home after an extended illness. He was 
70. 

Hammel was a 1 943 graduate of PC. 
He also earned a journalism degree from 
the University of Missouri. He left a 
career in journalism with International 
News Service, now United Press Interna- 
tional, to return to PC in 1949 as director 
of alumni and public relations. During 
the next four decades, he developed and 
directed a coordinated program of alumni 
and public relations, publications and in- 
formation services that heli)ed PC's rise 
to national recognition. He also devel- 
oped the award winning Annual Giving 
program, the Junior Fellows program, 
events such as Parent's Weekend, Youth 
Day, and a college magazine that was 
cited for excellence by the Council for the 
Advancement and Support of Education. 
In 1983, the Board of Tru.siccs elected 
him to the position of vice president for 
college relations. 

Hammet was al.so author of a 212 
page published history of the college, The 
Spirit of PC: A Centennial History of 
Presbyterian College. 

He was chosen for the inaugural Dis- 
tinguished Service Award of the PC Board 
of Visitors in 1966 and for the Alumni 
Ass(x;iation's highest honor, the Alumni 
GoldP.m 1971. When he retired in 19S9, 
he recievcd an honorary d(Ktoratc of hu- 
mane letters degree from Presbyterian 
College and also the Orderof the Palmetto, 
South Carolina's highest honor, by di- 
rection of GovemorCarroll Campbell. In 
1991, college officials named an annual 
award for media ethics and integrity in his 
honor. The first recipient will be an- 
nounced in early 1993. 

Memorials may be made to Hammet 
Scholarship, c/o Presbyterian College, 
South Broad Street, Clinton, South 
Carolina. 



PC offers opportunities to serve others 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



by Dennie Lynn Hill 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Last week I watched a moving 
television special on homelcssness 
in America. 1 have encountered 
homeless people in my lifetime and 
I always felt sympathy for tliem, but 
neverempathy. 1 never actually put 
myself in their position. The tele- 
vision special gave me a new insight 
into homelcssness through an in- 
terview with a homeless man named 
Isaiah. 

When we pass homeless people 
on the streets we do not know their 
name or anything about them per- 
sonally. But llie interview I watched 
showed me that there was more to 
these forgotten people tlian what we 
usually see. 1 now pray for a man 
named Isaiah, a man I do not know, 
but am touched by. Prayer alone is 
not enough, we must also be active 
in making a change by getting in- 
volved in organizations that help 



homeless pcpie. 

I cannot imagine being without a 
family for suppoa and love or noi 
knowing where 1 would llnd my next 
meal or if I would. 1 caniiol imagine 
sleeping on the sidewalks ol Washing 
ton, DC covered by newspapers, but 
many people 



"Prayer alone 
is not enough. " 



can imagine it because ihey live thai 
way every day 

Dum Vivitnus Scrvimus. as \\c live 
we serve, the motto that we, as part ol 
the PC community, are sup|X)sed to live 
by, but do we '.' 1 know that I need lo 
reconsider what my idea (^f sen. ice is 
1 think of my hrotherwho spends Saiur 
day mornings building houses lor the 
needy through llahital lor Humanilv 



^ el, ihere is a Habitat chapter on our 
campus and I have never even been 
involved, I applaud those students in 
Habitat who lake iheirtime and give of 
ihemselves tor others who need them. 
What 1 now reali/e is that the needy 
people who need the members of Habi- 
tat also need those who are not \cl 
members of Habitat. I challenge myself 
and all the siudenis and faculty at PC to 
become active in sersing others. II not 
through Habilal through any of the other 
service organi/alions on campus, lor 
ihere are many. Through Student Vol- 
unteer Ser\ ices alone there are over 20 
cominunii) service projects and just 
over 30 percent of the student body is 
involvetl I know that I am in the wrong 
percentage of that group. Together wc 
can make a dillerence in our school, 
community, stale, nation, and world I 
think It's time for us to serve as we live. 



Hansard Scholar sends impressions from London 



Dear Everyone, 

A bomb explosion in a tube station on 
an early Friday morning, now there's 
something that d(x;sn'l happen in Clinton, 
South Carolina. Hello to everyone on the 
PC campus, and I hope and trust everyone 
IS doing well. 1 have been meaning to write 
y 'all for a few weeks, so hcrc'sa letter from 
London. On Friday the 28th of I-cbmary I 
started my day with a nice one hour walk lo 
work on a typical fog covered English day. 

I usually ride the subway lo work bui ihis 
morning because of an IRA bomb e.xpio 
sion at a lube station on the oihcr side of 
town from where I live, the entire subway 
was closed. Yes I could have taken iho bus, 
but they wore as full as Springs mail hall at 

I I or 1 2 any day of the week. Anyway ihe 
walk was a nice change. In addition lo the 
bomb injuringa lew inmKcnt individuals It 



also turned the entire city of London upside 
down. People were fighting for cabs, fall- 
ing oul of red double decker buses, and 
most olall, walking with an objociive, not 
caring who they kniKkcd down. The thing 
was one day and one bomb wasn't enough. 
The next diiy I'm walking down Oxford 
Street and all at once (X)liccnian are yelling 
over the megaphone lor the crowd lo leave 
Oxford Street because ol a security aleri, 
but II ended up being a false alarm. Now 
then, that's all about Ixnnbs, now 111 icll 
y'all about London. To say it simply, and 
if the reader can k)rgcl the lirsl pari ol ihis 
letter; London is groat! I am Uiking some 
different courses and 1 work lorCiwynoih 
I)unw()(Kly who is 6 1 and a Labour moiiilvr 
in the House ol Commons. She is umiiios 
lionably one of die funniosi individuals 1 
have ever known and she is a woiulorful 



ix-rson to work lor, k\ause of her obvious 
humor. Tlie next ama/ing point isher mother 
is 82 and in iho House of U)rds and she isjust 
as funny. Tlioy are both as perfect as the 
Queen. 'Hioro'siMily twi) things wrong wilh 
Lt)iulon, the Pubs close at eleven every night 
and the air |H)llution is horrible. The paper 
might edit this oul, bul if they don't some 
Ivo[)le might not want to read the ncxl 
sonieiKO Tho air |H)llulion in London is so 
bad thai iho siull m your nose turns charcoiil 
hi iisoiiio 1 have traveled around 

llio I iiiiod Kingdom and have had some 
groat ox[XTioiioos I ihink of the oampusand 
v'all()lioiiaiultu)|KOveryoiio isdt)ing well. 
(i(HHl Luck to the spring teams in finishng 
tho If 



SO.ISOII 



Silk , Kl,, 

liilKiiavos 



ihe Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVl. Number 10 
March 27. 1992 

fxlilor in chief Dennie Lynn Hill 

Managing Editor Jason West 

News Editor Paul Atkinson 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichacl 

Sporu Editor Brad Busbec 

Entertainment Editor Angle Richardson 

Features Editor LcJcanna Maddox 

Environment Editor Heather Moncricf 

Photography Editor Brian Koehler 

Layout Editor Carolyn Nichols 

Copy Editor Mike Weaver 



Advertising Editor Ann Maylield 

Subscriptions Etlilor Ron Mixon 

Arlisl IdwardCiark 

Photography Staff 
Kimberlce Gibson Adrienne Ivcy 
Angela Mills 
Stajf Writers 

Maria Mcidanis Amanda Bowers 
Leigh Hearnburg Katherine Bonner 
Karen Wiitcnbrook Cher Fulliright 
Camisha Clarke Michelle ("antey 
Shara Ciarwood Fvereli ('alls 
Kaihryn .Spearman Frank McKay 

ihe Blue Stmking is a biweekly student 
publication of Presbyterian College. The 
paper serves as a forum of news ;ui(l opmion 



ol regional and national concern, for 
advertising, contact t he Blue Slofking. 
Presbyterian College, Box 1061. Clinton, SC 
2'H J s / he Blue Stinking welcomes letters to 
llie editor from all members of the PC 
comniunily Signatures are required. IatiU'Is 
arc printed on a space available bias the Blue 
Stixking reserves the right t«) edit all letters for 
pnnK'r grammar and punctuation The final 
deadline for submitiiiig letters is Friday at 
12 (M) prn on the week K-tore public alion 



EDITORIAL 



Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters 



Dear Editor, 

There have been many rumors circulat- 
ing the campus referring to the possibility of 
the commencement exercises being held 
outside on the front pla/a. As a graduating 
senior, I am very interested in this subject 
The day of commencement is one which is 
very important in the life of a .senior. For 
some, it marks the beginning of pure adult- 
hood. Therefore, it should be a day which 
the student can enjoy, lake pnde in and look 
back upon and be proud of. Granted, I will 
have my diploma framed and placed upon 
my wall to look at and reflect upon my four 
years at Presbyterian College , and no matter 
where the event takes place, I will remember 
it. However, my education at Presbyterian 
College is more than just a piece of paper. It 
is friendships, both good and bad limes, 
love — of people and of the environment in 
which I received my education. Therefore, 
the day of commencement is one which 
should belong to the seniors. As Dr. Orr 
Slated at this year's opening convocation, 
seniors are allowed lo march in with the 
faculty because it marks the beginning of 
one's .senior year, and therefore they (the 
seniors) should be recognized. Could we 
also not be rccogni/ed by having OUR com- 
mencemeni service where wc (the senior 
class) have requested ii over these past few 
years? 

My high school graduation was held 
outdoors and despite my graduating class 
being small (69), the ceremony was one 
which was both inspiring and touching. 
Looking back upon the ceremony, I see how 
important it was for the ceremony to have 
been conducted outdoors, surrounded by the 
trees, buildings, teachers, fnends and family 
that 1 matured wiih. It proved lo me that I 
learned informauon not only from books bul 
also from the environment in which thai 
learning ux>k place. 

I reali/c that if the weather for the 
service were inclement, ihe service could 
noi be held ouid(X)rs. 1 also understand thai 
the expense for such an event may be quiie 
high. But, to be perfectly honest, I think, no, 
I know that I am worth that money. My 
parents paid well over $5(),(X)() to this insu- 
lution and foranevenl like this, I feel money 
should be spent If money is a problem, do 
not have a reception after the ceremony or 
hold a luncheon. Instead put that money in 
a fund to pay for chairs and labor. 

As a child growing up, I was always 
told to noi refuse something which I never 
tned at least once. Since this controversy 
began, the only siatcmenis I have heard 
against having commencement on the pla/.a 
are assumptions. The weather may be ptxjr, 
it may cost more money, in general, it may 
not work at all. Bul, the weather may be 
cooler, ihc pla/ij would provide a more 
attractive site for the event and students 
would enjoy it more bcxausc it is what a 
majority of them voted for in ihe last elec- 



In conclusion, I would just hke to em- 
phasize again thalcommencemeniexercises 
are designed to honor the students and their 
accomplishments dunng their four years in 
college. Why not make that ceremony what 
the persons being honored want? 



Sincerely, 
John Douglas 



Dear Editor: 

Warren Blanchard's letter in your last 
edition concerns and pu/./les me. Mr. 
Blanchard and 1 attended the same convo- 
cation on January 20. bul we apparently 
heard quite different messages. 1 heard a 
Presbyienan minister calling me lo live oul 
the gospel of Jesus Christ 1 was reminded 
by the minister, Murphy Davis, that sin (in 
one example, domestic violence) is not 
confined to the "others " of society but exists 
also in the lives and hearts of people just like 
us; that God is present m even the sick, the 
poor, the homeless, the imprisoned, the 
outcast of society and thus that whatever I 
do (or don't do) for those less fortunate, I do 
(or don't do) for God; that something is not 
quite right about a world in which some 
have mwe than enough while olhers have 
nothing at all; and that whether it mi^es me 
uncomfortable to be told so or not, il is 
basically sinful for me to sit around passively 
(perhaps watching TV) when I should instead 
be actively carrying God's love to the world. 
Admittedly, the gospel of Chri.si ls a 
radical call to service, but I am surpnsed and 
saddened tfiai here at Presbyienan College - 
with the moito While We Live, We Serve- 
ihc gospel message would seem so radical as 
to incilc a student to defame the character of 
the minister who presented it. 

I hope that the time will come on this 
campus when no one will seek lo "kill the 
messenger" who brings an un.setlling mes- 
sage and when we can all di.scuss without 
rancw, dcfensivcncss. and slanderevcn those 
ideas with which we disagree. 

Sincerely, 

Ann D. Moorefield 



Dear Editor: 

I am writing to thank all the pcDple who 
helped me in my campaign. You don't 
know how much I appraiaicd and needed 
the support that you gave me over the last 
two weeks. There were Umes when I itK)ught 
everything would fall apart, bul then you 
were there lo encourage me and give me the 
strength I needed to keep going. Many of 



you don't even know that you helped me, 
but I intend to gel in touch with you indi- 
vidually and express my gratitude personally. 
Thanks also to all of you who supported me 
with your votes; thank you for having con- 
fidence enough to trust me with such a 
responsibility. 

Second, I would like to congratulate 
Michael on his victory as well as the other 
newly elected SGA officers on theirs. I feel 
confident that he will take his job seriously 
and perform to the best of his ability as 
president. I also want to thank Michael and 
Heather for their compeiitive, but fair, op- 
position. I had a great deal of fun these past 
two weeks and hope that they feel the same. 

Sincerely, 
Frank McKay 



Dear Editor, 

The Presbyienan College Men's Bas- 
ketball Program wanted to thank ihe Blue 
Thunder Pep Band along with director Orval 
Oleson and also the PC Blue Hose Cheer- 
leaders and director Susan Poison for their 
efforts throughout the season. Also, a spe- 
cial thank you for the tremendous effort and 
support you gave our team at the SAC 
Tournament Your support and enthusiasm 
carried our team to the Fmals. 

Thanks Again, 

1992 PC Basketball Team 

Greg Niben 

Head Basketball Coach 



Dear Editor, 

1 am a sophomore, and I hve in Bailey 
Hall. People ask me why I live in Bailey, but 
unless you have expenenced the fellowship 
in Bailey you can't knock it I firmly believe 
it is one of the best dorms on campus. 
Believe it or not a lot of people would agree 
with me. All this aside, there are certain 
improvements which could be made. Oh 
sure, it would be nice to have a total reno- 
vation, but 1 don't see that happening in the 
near future. 

Bailey needs air! There is only one 
other dorm on campus (Doyle) that has no 
air conditioning. The rumors from Douglas 
House are that Doyle is to gel renovations 
and air over the summer. Presbyienan 
College can affonl a new gazebo, a rww 
academic building, a new maintenance 
building, and a new theater. Yet it can't 
afford au^condiuoning for Bailey. Why is 
that? 

Bai le y needs a face! i ft. The dorm could 
be improved UK) percent by a simpk paini 
job and new carpel. We also need new 
washing machines and dryers. The washers 
thump loud enough to be mistaken fcN^ a 
Victonan-agehckopicr landing site. Wwse 



yet, the dryers cost 25 cents, and they run fw 
about 10 to 1 5 minutes. I'm not exaggerat- 
ing. It once cost me more to dry my clothes 
than it did to wash them. 

Bailey Hall has a lot of history and 
unfortunately it shows every ntoment of it 
Most of the guys who live m Bailey have a 
special place in their hearts for it, yet we 
can'thelp thinking that when Bailey became 
run down PC built two new dorms for the 
girls that lived here. The guys got stuck with 
the remains. As a Caledonian, I'm told to tell 
prespec lives that there are no freshman dorms 
on campus, yet that is exactly what Bailey is. 

No other dorm on campus is as fun or 
friendly as Bailey. I don't understand why 
the admini.siraiion can't see fit to make the 
minor improvements I've mentioned. Last 
year. I asked a senior administrative officer 
if Baily was getting some improvements. 
He chuckled quitely and said thai about 
three dorms before Bailey were slaied to be 
fixed up. What are those? Maybe Barron 
and Smyth? It's Baily 's Uim to be fixed up, 
and I urge the administration to ihmk about 
It 



Sincerely, 
Warren Sloan, 
Bailey Hall 



President 



Dear Editor, 

The members of Alpha Sigma Phi 
wish to dispel any rumors conccmmg the 
fight at the Alpha Sigma Phi-Social Gub 
mixer on March 21. Time Raskins, a non- 
student and an uninvited guest , started an 
altercation shortly after midnight dunng the 
mixer. The only involvement of the Brothers 
of Alpha Sigma Phi was an attempt to break 
up the fight between Mr. Haskins and a few 
of the invited guests, and to call Public 
Safety for disordcriy conduct. Wc have 
taken steps to prevent any further incidents 
sue has this one. We apologize toany and all 
guests who had to witness the incident 
Again, we wish to cmphaize that no Brother 
or Pledge of Alpha Sigma Phi was involved. 
Also, the incident was not a product of 
Social Club's participation in the mixer. We 
regret thai there are ckments in society 
today that cause these kinds of problems. 
We, the members of Alpha Sigma Phi, wish 
to eliminate jmy forms of aggression on this 
campus. The reaswi for the mixer was to 
promote a better social environment for all 
PC suidents. 

Respectfully. 

The Brothers and Pledges 

of Alpha Sigma Phi 



Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters 



NEWS 



rRlDAY. MARCH 27, 1992 



SGA Election Returns 

* - denotes winners 

♦Mike Martin 

Frank McKay 

Heather Moncrief 



Vice President 

♦Ron Mixon 

Wendy Hubbard 

Hagan Thompson 

Jay Sims 

Chris Weldon 

Secretary 

♦Jeff Garrison 
Whui Min Chang 

Treasurer 

♦Karen Sharper 

Judicial Chair 

♦Lauren Owings 

S UP P r gs i d^Pt 

♦Meg Oxford 

Should GDH serve styrofoam? 

Yes - 27 
No - 384 

Should GDH find an alternative 
to styrofoam? 

Yes - 379 
No- 18 

Should graduation be held 
outside or inside? 

Outside - 353 
Inside -44 

Total number voted in general 
election - 520 ( 47.2%) 

Toml number voted in run-off 
election -460 (41.8%) 



PC Board of Trustees approves faculty promotions 

Stallworth made officer by being named Dean of Alumni Affairs 



Press Release 

OFHCE OF PUBIC RELATIONS 




College Board of Trustees, which met Feb- 
ruary 24 and 25 at the college. 

Stallworth, also an associate professor 
of religion and philosophy at PC, had served 
as director of alumni affairs since 1 99(). He 
has also held the posts of chaplain, dean of 
students, soccer coach and faculty athletic 
representative during his 33 years of sevice 
at the college. 

'Tom Stallworth has effectively served 
Presbyterian College in many cap«;iliesover 



the years. I am very pleased the Board of 
Trustees has approved my recommenda- 
tion that he be promoted to Dean ol Alumni 
Activities and designated an officer of the 
college, "PC President KenncihB.Orr said. 

Stallworth, an ordained mmisicr, 
earned his bachelor's degree in Bible from 
Presbyterian College in 1955. He added a 
bachclorof divinity degree from Columbia 
Theological Seminary before beginning a 
14-month stint as assistant pastor of First 
Presbyteriiui Church in Rome, Oeorgia. 
Stallworth later did graduate study ai Union 
Seminary, where he earned his master's 
degree in thei)k)gy. 

He returned lo ?C in 1959 as chaplain 
and assistant professor of religion. In 1969. 
he accepted the dean of students posiuon, 
but returned to the classrcx)m full-ume in 
1971, teaching courses in Old and New 
Testament, philosophy, and s(xiology. He 
has served as chairman of the faculty ath- 
letic committee and faculty represeniauve 
to the National Association of 
Inlercollegiaie Athletics, m addition to di- 
recting activiues in the alumni office. 

The PC Board of Trustees also ap- 
proved six faculty promouons. Dr. Jonathan 
T. Bell was promoted loas.sociate professor 
of physics, while Dr. Jerry K. Slice was 
promoted to associate professor of eco- 
nomics and business administration. Pro- 
moled and granted tenure were: Mark 



Anderst)n, ass<Kiate profes.sor of art; Dr. 
David Evans, asscx laie professor of chemis- 
try; Meredith McQueen Holder, as.sociaic 
professor of business admimstrauon; and 
Dr. BcH)kerT. Ingram, as.s(xiatc professor 
of political science. 

Also granted tenure were Dr. Orval 
Oleson, asscKiate professor of music, and 
Dr. Robert Morrison, asscxiatc professor of 
French and Spanish. 

The Board also appointed and reap- 
pointed depariniental chairs for the 1992-93 
acadt'mic year. Reappointed to another four- 
year term as chair of the business and eco- 
nomics department was Sam Howell, as.so- 
ciatc professor of business admimsu^tion. 
Reap[X)inied as chair ol the physical eduauon 
dcparuneni wa^ Bob Su-ixk, assistant pro- 
fessor of physical educauon. 

The terms of Dr. Joel Jones (mathemat- 
ics) and Dr. Ingram (poliucal science) will 
be extended three more years, and Dr. Do- 
rothy Brandt, Charles A. Dana Professor of 
Education, was apixiinicd to fill a two-year 
vacancy as chair of \i\c txlucauon department 

Dr. Bell was appointed chair of the 
physics and computer science department, 
while 1. 1. Colonel James Staples, who has 
been appt)inted by the US Army to succa'd 
Lt. Colonel Joel Rexlord as professor of 
military science this fall, was confirmed as 
chair of the military science department 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



POLITICS 



Duke Power gift to help with Neville Hall renovation 



Press Release 

OFHCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Duke Power Company completed its 
pledge to Presbyterian College ' s renovation 
of historic Neville Hall, as Duke Power 
officials Alan Sweet of the L^aurens office 
and John Geer of the Anderson-area office 
presented a check for $40,000 to PC Presi- 
dent Dr. Kenneth B. Orr. 

That contribution brought Duke Power's 
total gift to $100,000 during its five-year 
pledge, which will help renovation projects 
on Neville Hall continue throughout the 
spring and summer. The facility contains 
classrooms, faculty offices, and a language 
laboratory. 

"This gift will altew us to continue with 
the interior and structural renovations of 
Neville Hall, which is the academic heart of 
the campus," said Dr. Ted Brown, vice 
president for financ lal development. "Duke 
Power's .support of this project will help 
ensure the future vitality of this facility." 

The exterior of Neville Hall was com- 
pletely refurbished in 1988. and work on 
classrooms and corridors is currently under- 
way. Thefacihiy.buiUin 1907, is named for 
former PC President W.G. Neville. 






'f?S 



A 



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'1 



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4#* 



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|Nevllle Hall serves as Ike focal point oT the Pt campus. 




'Rubbergate' scandal has been 'blown way out of proportion* 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

Yet another scandal has reared its ugly 
head in the Hou.se of Representatives. Thou- 
sands ofchecks have bounced in what many 
havedubbcd"mbbergalc." Ouu-agous! Who 
do these elected officials think they are.' 
Why should they be able to write bad 
checks — checks that are covered without 
bound by the House bank— and not have to 
pay any kind ofpenally like most Americans 
would.' And besides, these arc the people 
who are supposed to be running the counU'y , 
yet they don't seem to be able to balance 
their own checkbooks. (Perhaps that's why 
we have a S4(K) billion deficit this year. ) It's 
one more scandalous example of a corrupt 
iuul .self-serving congress.. .or is it.' 

Before passing judgement one should 
first look at the nature of the "bank" itself. 1 
put that word in quotation marks because it 
is really just a check cashing lacility, set up 
lor House members over 1 >0 ye;tf s ago as a 
convenience. Every month's paycheck goes 
into the "bank," and the memlx-r can write 
checks against that balance, or withdraw the 
entire amount for deposit in a separate ac- 
count, such as that of a more traditional 
bank. There is no fee for use of the House 
bank, but there are no interest payments 
either. Therefore, when someone overdraws 
their account, what really happens is they 
arc borrowing the money from the other 
congres.smen. at no cost to the taxpayer. 

Let me illustrate; South Carolina Na- 
tional — as well as most IcKal banks— has a 
similar system where students can open a 
checking account with no cost and no mini- 
mum balance re^iuirement, but also pay no 
interest. You even get a one hundred dollar 



"overdraft protection" to cover any bad Therefore, congressmen payed no heed to 
checks. There are two main differences being overdrawn a few thousand dollars. 



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between this bank and the one in the Hoase. 
1 ) Interest payments: When you or 1 use the 
bank's money, we have to pay for it. That's 
how banks make a profit. The House bank, 
however, isanoi-for-profit institution; hence 
the "free" loans. 2) Overdraft limits: The 
difference here is. they didn't have any. 



Yet, according to Congressman John Spratt 
(DSC) the Hoase bank never had less than 
one or two million dollars in iL 

But should we have people in Congress 
that are this sloppy with their finances? And 
what about those poeple who wrote hun- 
dreds of bad checks? Should they be al- 



lowed to abuse the system like this? 

Well, certainly the House bank needed 
stricter rules, but it should be pointed out 
that before last September there were no 
rules. Members didn't have to refrain from 
writing bad checks. It has been shown in 
recent weeks that overdrawing their accounts 
was politically stupid for the House mem- 
bers, but I would contend that, financially 
speaking, you would be an idiot not to take 
full advantage of the system. If someone 
says to you, "Here's some money; take as 
much as you want and pay it back whenever 
you can," would you not take it? As for the 
sloppy question, well, if there was no charge 
lor wriung a bad check, what reasons would 
you have for being meticulous about your 
records? Why worry about letting it happen 
again? 

As for those who were not just sloppy but 
knew full well what they were doing, per- 
haps milking money on these interest-free 
loans... we 11, 1 seriously doubt thai there arc 
many members of Congress that are that 
greedy. Let's face it, they are in the public 
service department. Most of those who 
aren't already well-off could make more 
money in the private sector. If financial gain 
is their goal, then they prc^ably wouldn'tbe 
in Congress. 

1 say forget about something so unimpor- 
tant and petty as "rubbergate." Something 
Ihat has obviously been blown way out of 
proportion shouldn't affect who we send to 
Congress. Let's spend our energy on more 
important matters. It'stimeioputlhis"H(xise 
bank" stuff into perspective. 



Commentary: US welfare system in need of reform 



by Leigh Hearnhurg 

STAFF WRITER 

Is it possible to beat a dead horse any 
more than Americans have when dealing 
with welfare? Just the mere mention of the 
word sends chills down every |X)litician"s 
spme. It has proven lo be one of those 
insurmountable i.ssues that everyone has an 
opinion about but few have answers and 
even fewer have workable answers. 

Politicians and honest people alike have 
simply chosen to put the issue of welfare 
aside and hope that somehow without di- 
rectly addressing the issue America can 
work its way around the problem and even- 
tually solve it. However, recently around 
the natu)n the issue has once again been 
brought 10 the forefront and Americans are 
agreeing to disagree and hoping thai die 
welfare system will fix itself. It won't. 

The recent California ruling in Miller v. 
Carlson dealt with problems from reform, 
and W isconsin 's governor lead a headsuong 
fight to reform his slate's welfare progmm 
These examples have reminck'd us that even 
when the federal government has addressed 
an issue and "solved" the apirarcni problem. 



as the government did with the Job Oppor- 
luniues and Basic Skills (JOBS) program, 
the problems for the individual slates are 
last beginning. JOBS was enacted as piirt of 
the \^M welfare reform program, and re- 
quires suites to offer education and training 
to help make welfare clients self-sulficieni. 

In Miller v. Carlson, a federal judge 
ruled that Califomia must provide child- 
care assistance to people on welfare who arc 
enrolled in stale approved education and 
training aciiviiies, under the guidlines set up 
in JOBS. The case was brought up by 
families who could not gel child-care as a 
result of budget cuts. In Wtsconsin. Gover- 
nor ITiompson has implemented something 
called Le;inifare, which takes away some 
welfiuv benefits from families whose chil- 
dren have a high number of unexcu.s.scd 
absences from sch<H)l. 

To satisfy ihe requirements of the fed- 
eral reform bill, every state implemented its 
own personal JOBS pri>gram, F.ach stiiie's 
program develojx'd its own personality and 
Its own problems; however, the concept in 
all of the suites was the same. Now, though, 
the great idea has become a reality of prob 



lems for many suites. Califomia, ba:ause of 
the ruling in Miller v. Carlson, is going to 
lose thousands upt)n thousands of dollars 
and in Wisconsin Governor Thompson's 
efforts to turn around the system there have 
resulted m a huge political battle and every- 
one in the suite seems to be losing out: 
Uixpayers and welfare recipients alike. The 
problems that those and many other suites 
are facing are old ones that simply have new 
issues added on to them. Should the suite 
have to provide childcare for all welfare 
recipients? Exactly how far can the .suite go 
in Its regulauons in order to reform the 
system? These are just two of the quesuons 
that California and Wisconsin are facing 
respectively, along with a myriad of other 
problems m other suites. 

Because of badly regulated programs 
many people recive benefits without doing 
anything. Also, many programs have been 
critici/ed for encouraging single mothers lo 
avoid marriage and have more kids. The 
bottom line is that though reform has bcxn 
implemented, the problems of the welfare 
system are far from st)lved. Day after day in 
suite after suite p^'ople ;ve uiking advantage 



of the system and the taxpayers are losing. 
The other side of the com is that there are 
people out there in ihc system who arc 
losing aJsQ. Mwe and more ixoblems are 
ansing such as those faced by California and 
Wisconsin and the old problems haven't 
even been solved yet 

It is easy to identify these problems but 
difficult to solve them. The first step is 
idenuficatiCTi. However, the next .step is 
action That is what Governor Thompson is 
doing in Wisconsin. Even though his poli- 
cies are controversial, he is promoting ac- 
tion and results in dealing with the problems 
of welfare. Similarily, in California, the 
lawsuit has been just as controversial, yet it 
has bn)ught attention to the problems that so 
desperately need to be solved. 

Most Americans agree that the welfare 
system is in need of reform , but few agree on 
how we should go about it. Instead of 
debating the possible solutions and backing 
down from contn)versy, politicians and ev- 
eryone need to address the issues head on 
and begin trying different solutions. 

The examples for action are out there if 
only all of America will lake nofcc. 



flic photo 



POLITICS 



IKIDW. MARCH 27,1992 



IKIDAV. MARCH 27, 1992 



7 



ENVIRONMENT 



Presidential Field Narrows Down To Four Candidates 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

The number of candidates in this 
year's primary has now been reduced lo 
four. On the Democrat's side there is 
only Bill Clinton of Arkansas and former 
govemorof California Jerry Brown. And 
in the race for the republican nomination 
Pat Buchanan is still causing problems 
for President Bush, even though getting 
the nomination at this point would be just 
about numerically impossible. 

The Democrats. In what was a sur- 
prise move lo many people Tsongas 
dropped out of the race last week, staling 
lack of funds as his reason. He also had 
not done as well as he ncede<l to do in 
Michagan and Illinois, as he barely held 
his own against Brown. Clinton took 
about half of the popular vote in both 
states, and now has the nomination pretty 
much wrapped up. 

Clinton had said late last year that 
these two states were the true lest for the 
pnmary, since ihey are both neutral terri- 
tory for the candidates. He has worked 
for months organizing in both stales, 
with the help of prominent friends from his 
school days at Yale. In fact, for a governor 
of a small, poor state, Clinton has a tremen- 
dous network of contacts. Senator Sam 
Nunn gave his campaign credibility early 
on, and fonner governors Richard Riley of 
South Carolina and James Blanchard of 
Michigan have both endorsed him. 
When allegations of draft dcxlging threat- 
ened the campaign, many former Rhcxles 
scholars who studied with Clinton at Oxford 
came to his defence, including Harvard 
economist Robert Reich and Time magazine 
Editor-at-Large Strobe Talbott. And of 
course his wife, Hillary Clinton, is a great 
asset. She has been rated one of the country's 
top 1(X) lawyers for a number of years, and 
she has many powerful lawyer friends m 
both New York City and Washington, D.C. 

It's thanks to these and many other high 




^y Loural HarJ 




"J 



o 

placed FOB'S (Friends Of Bill) that Clinton 
has had the finacial backing needed for a 
successful national campaign. Finances, or 
lack thereof, is the major cause of Harkin, 
Kerry, and Tsongas all pulling out of the 
race. Brown, who has said he will not accept 
any donations over SKX), is barely holding 
on. But he vows that he will slick with it 
until the last primary, which will bo in Cali- 
fornia on June 2. While other candidates 
travel on charted planes, he squeezes into 
the coach. sec lion of scheldulcd flights, sleeps 
on foldoul couches, and is driven around by 
unpaid volunteers. Brown, however, is get- 
ling a surprising amount of money through 
his infamous 80() number ( I -8(X)-426- 1112) 
which, at this point, is the only thing keeping 
him going. 

The Republicans. Ilicrc is a lot of pres- 
sure on Buchanan to gel out of the race 



before he dcx's icx) much damage lo Bush's 
campaign. Buchanan has acknowledged 
that he won't be able lo get the nomination 
now, but he says he is slaying on until 
California so ihal he can push the Republi- 
can parly in ihe "right" direction (no pun 
intended). "We've been driving the debate, 
so why quit when we are winning the lu^gu- 
meni?" Winning the argument indeed; many 
[K'ople jt)kingly say that Buchanan is run- 
ning the country. When he cniici/ed tlio 
piresidcnt for funding |X)mographic art, the 
White House res|xinded by lirmg ihe head 
of the National Endowment lor the Aris. He 
attacked a proposal that would require 
churches to disclose the names of large 
contributors, and Bush quickly replied thai 
the policy would be "reevaluated." AntI 
finally, alter Buchanan haqx'd relentlessly 
about Bush breaking his "no new taxes" 



pledge. Hush lold Ihe Allunla Journal 
thai raising taxes was "a big misiake." 

Perhaps the most common criticism 
ot Bush these days is ihat he is unprin- 
cipled. The/V't'H' York Tirrws rceenUy said 
that he had an "appalling lack of con- 
viction"' and called hini "President 
NcHHlle." Even Ronald Reagan was re- 
fX)riedtohave said that Bush "just doesn't 
seem to stand lor anyihmg." Reagan 
denied Uie stor\ , however, and later had 
this to say during an apiviu^ence at the 
Los Angeles' Regency Club: "George 
Bush was with me in my crusade. I 
support his candidacy lo the fullest." 
Even Nix()n, who criticised the US re- 
six)nsetotlieSovieicrisisas"paiheucally 
inadequate," said ihai Bush was "without 
question. ..the K'si man to lead the Liniied 
Stales and ilie Iroo vvorld in the years 
ahead." 

* Nevertheless, tempers are weanng thin 
in the Bush camp as the re-election cam- 
paign seems lo be tloundering. Some 
advi.sors wanihiin lo give concessions to 
win back the conservative right, while 
other are cautioning again.si alienating 
the nKKleraics w ho got him elected in the 
tirsl place. Now Bush has returned to Wash- 
mgion in resjxinse lo charges ihat he should 
act more "presidenual" 

As tor Buchanan, many [vople wonder 
why he insists on staying in ihe race. He 
can't seem to get much more than a third ot 
the [X)pular vote in any primary, and even 
the NiUiofuil Review has said he should dn)p 
uui But what he is probably doing is selling 
himsell up lor h>^)6, just like Reagan did 
when he ran against Gerald lord 16 years 
ago. By the time he gets to California, 
Buchanan could have a mailing list of nearly 
5(),(KK)supix)riersand many im|x>riani PAC 
connections. I'his will give him ;in edge 
overpossible lutureCiUulidaies, suchas Vice 
l*resideni Quayle, James Baker, and Jack 
Kemp. So lor now, ox[X'ci lo continue 
hearing his |X)inted alUieks against "King 
Georkie " 



Contra tula tions ! 


Our 


new initiated sisters! 


Rebecca Bacock 




Vanessa McAlister 


Miki Barden 




Kiiren O'Connor 


Mary Beth Bruinbelow 


Kelsey Oelschlanger 


Tracy Pierro 




Shealy Painter 


Liz Foster 




Lori Randall 


Erin Fox 




Melynda Ray 


Jennifer Harvey 




Sally Schafer 


Karen Ivey 




Tracy Tixld 


Pam Kendall 


Lancy Wilkie 


Martha Ann King 


Zcta 


tirau 


aipfta 



The Upi.scop.ll Church 1 s}H'cially Weliumi-.s Students 
+ ALL SAINTS' L I' I S C () P A L CHUUfH 
One niock North oj Ofreiunlh- /Jmifu; llnil 



8..'?0 am 

945 mi 

10.30 am 

ILOO am 
6.00 pm 



Holy Fill hjrisl 
CluiMian I'lkicadon 
Coffee (in Piiish Hall) 

Holy Luch.irisl 

♦ ( ANIEKHURY - tor College Students 



Nood someone to talk lo? 



llif Hev N.imv ) .\{\n,m. Rf,i,<r (HH HHH) 
Ilie Kpv I (1111.1)1 IV.u4.il. P,,,,. .,, . .^.,,,, . 



PC collects 3^09 pounds 
of recyclable material 

hy Heather Moncrief 

f-.NVIRONMENT LDITOR 



Recycle PC has received iLs first 
weight sialiMics for materials recycled by 
Presbyterian College students, adminisu-a- 
iive staff, and faculty. Pariicipalion has 
been greater than was anticipated, and for 
the first recycling pcnod, U)tal weight of all 
recyled materials amounted lo .^,5()9 lbs. 
The statistics for each of the recycled items 
are as follows: 

MATLRIAL POUNDS COLLECTED 



CARDBOARD 


406 


CANS 


610 


GLASS 


403 


LEDC.ER PAPER 


493 


NEWSPAPER 


1.597. 




Drinking and drugs 
cloud your mind and 
cause risky choices. 

Unsafe sex can lead to 
AIDS. 

Get help for a drug or 
drinking problem. 

If you have sex, use a 
condom. Or avoid fak' 
ing the risk olfogetlier. 



fiio Oyi Aboii Mi S[x 



mUEWALK SIUIVEY 

What is your opinion of the recently 
implemented Recycle PC program? 
Do you see it as successful? 




hie photo 



Laura Smith, junior. 



"Ideally, It's a super concept and I com- 
mend those who have made efforts in that 
du-eciion. 1 see it as making a difference, but 
It could be improved . For one, it could push 
to disconunue the use ot. Styiufoam prod- 
ucts m G DH. Also, there arc some problems 
w iih places to ace umulaie the ree yc led glass, 
paper, etc. in the dorms. For instance fire 
regulations do not aDow for available space 
10 house containers. But overall I thmk il is 
effective, especially with aluminum." 




"Whereas, the P.C. recycling elfi>ri is 
now in full swing technically- well, what 
aKnit in reality ' It is al-Kuil lime PC. joined 
the recycling bandwagon. I want losee this 
projecl conunued and expanded, like more 
receptacles in more places. Now that it is 
started, let's get everyone involved stu- 
dents and faculty. More publicity and 
awareness raising activities musl compli 
mcni this movement to spur mvolvemcni 
and keep it alive." 





Will Liiidstrom, junior. 



file f^to 



Kathleen Dowd, sophomore. 



"The steps PC has taken are just a 
beginning lo a successful recycling pro- 
gram. The program has started to make 
more students aware of the need lo recycle 
and of Ihe problems our society faces. We 
live in an extremely wasteful environment, 
and every attempt we can make to slop the 
wasie should be done. 

The sieps taken that I am aware of 
include the recycling bins in Neville Hall, 
the dormiiones, and other public areas. 1 
have seen numerous students use them; and 
hopefully, we will continue to use them. 
The Eco-mugs sold by SEE, for exampte, 
are a great way to gel students lo do iheir 
share. I think that we should continue to 
make students more and more aware by 
publicizing the need ihai exists. I think 
people like you, Mother . have broughiaKxjt 
a lot of consciousness concerning the envi- 
ronment. (I forgot lo mention the SEE land- 
fill. I don't know exactly what the purpose 
of that pnijeci was; bui if it had gotten more 
publicity. It wouW have had more of an 
impact.) The Recycle PC program is on its 
w ay to being a positive and needed infbience 
on PC" 



"I think that the Recycle PC program is 
fantastic, but I don't feel thatit can be called 
successful. "Successful" implies comple- 
tion, and recycling must be an ongoing 
process. There may never be a victory, but 
we must continue to work towards the goal. 

As for the program itself, selling the 
SEE mugs was a fantastic idea, as was 
placing the recycling bins around campus. 
Perhaps certain locations could be targeted 
for more of the bins (fraternity court jumps 
to mmd). Finally, SEE seems like a great 
ideas, and I hope to see its results soon. 

Maybe we can ' t make a difference half- 
way aromd the world, but we can work to 
improve our own allotted space. The ma- 
j«ity of us are hving in the lap of luxury, 
and I think it's great that so much 'carpe- 
dieming' is going on. I do hale, howevw, 
that this could be the last day we'll seize. I 
guess my best suggestion would be contin- 
ued education; without awareness, there is 
no hope." 





fikpholo 
Landon Westbrwik, M)phomore. 



"1 think the program has been very 
successful, I believe that many people were 
already recycling aluminum cans, but now 
more people are also raveling glass. I d 
like to see more recycling of plastic. It is 
especially gcxxl to see the raycling of led- 
ger paper because we get so much junk mail 
from student and school organizations. 1 
think the recycling committee has done a 
great job, but I 'd like to see the whole schcxil 
participate more su-ongly with ^recyclable 

materials." 



SPORTS 



8 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



RIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



FEATURES 




photo by Kim Gibson 
Zeta Tau Alpha, Sigma Sigma Sigma, and Theta Chi received awards Tor 
showing their spirit for PC. 



Basketball spirit awards are given 



The winners of the spirit contest held 
over the entire basketball season are: In first 
place Theta Chi, second SigmaSigmaSigma, 
and in third place Zeta Tau Alpha. Ben 
Jones accepted the first place award for 
Theta Chi while Celest Bowers accepted the 
second place award for Sigma Sigma Sigma 
and Elizabeth Perusse accepted the third 
place award for Zeta Tau Alpha. 



Head Coach Gregg Nibcri expressed 
his appreciauon to these three groups by 
presenting cash prizes to each. He also 
thanked the PC pep biind who traveled with 
the team to the conlcrcnce toumiuneni. "1 
would like to let everyone who supported us 
m any way thisseason know that iheirefforLs 
were well appreciated by the tciim's players 
and coaching si:\ff. 



Women's Basketball finishes a winning season 



Shara (Jarwood 

STAFF WRITER 

The PC Women's Basketball Team fin- 
ished their season with a winning record of 
16-10. The season drew to a close at the 
South Atlantic 



Conference 
Tournament in 
Boiling 
Springs, North 
Carolina, on 
February 20- 
22, when the 
team lost to 
Wingatebyone ____________ 

point, 65-64. 

PC went into the tournament fourth in 
the conference. They had won only two out 
of their last seven games. The Lady Blue 
Hose lost to lender 64-50, Catawba 64-49, 
Elon 87-75, Mars Hill 88-83, and Wingate 
67-59, before beating Carson-Newman 59- 
53 and Converse 78-72. 



'We had a great start and 

Vm very pleased with 

the season and the kids' 



Coach Beth Couture wants to empha- 
size the team's winning record. She slated, 
"The team played hard and improved a lot 
and we hope to improve more next year." 
ITie top three scorers of the year were 

MelanieJohn- 
———■———--'—' son, Jennifer 

Milliard, and 
Allison 
Hubbard with 
an average of 
13.5,11.8,and 
10.4 points, 
respectively. 
.^_^_____,^___ Allison 

Hubbard was 
the leader of the team in field goals, shooting 
5 1 .4 percent. Katie L(x;kwood lal the team 
in rebounds with an average of 4.9. 

Coach Couture says she is looking 
forward to next year. "We had a great start 
and I'm very pleased with the season and the 
kids," she said. 



PC Tennis teams 
ranked nationally 

bv Brad Busbee 

si^ORTS EDITOR 

This year's lenftts season has brought a 
great deal of success to PC's men's and 
women's Blue Hose Tennis teams. The 
women 's tennis team boasts a fine 9-6 record 
and is ranked sixteenth in the nation while 
the men's squad is ranked nineteenih in the 
NAlAandhasa 14-1 1 record. Bothof PC's 
tennis teams express enthusiasm about thoir 
play and show opumism about ihoir re 
maining matches. 

The Lady Blue Hose swept conference 
rivals Catawba College and Elon College *' 
last weekend. Elon was ranked eighth in 
the nation. "We feel very suong and arc 
excited abt)ut our matches with Wingalc, 
Converse and Carson-Newman next wc<"k 
end," pointed out Coach Arnold. "Minda 
(Jrilfin, Dina Pagent, and Michelle Pace are 
all playing exU'emely well," she saul. 

The conference matches with Wingak 
on Friday and the match with Converse oi) 
Saturday will be held here at PC. Sunday, 
the squad will uavel to Carson-Nes^nian to 
compete in their fourth regular season con 
ferencc match. 

The men's tennis team has also had 
success. Alter their three wins out of six 
matches over spring break one of w hich w as 
a win overihirteenili ranked FlaglerCollege, 
the team has been gaining momentum 
According to Coach McKec, the way die 
squad recently played against Coasuil 
Carolina showed a great deal of progress 
"Even though we lost, we kx^kcd much 
better than we did last year," pointed out 
McKc<.\ 

This weekend will be a big weekend for 
the men's team as well. Saturday morning 
PC will face Lincoln Memorial and at two- 
thirty that aftern(K)n, they will host High 
Point College. Sunday, Berry College who 
IS currently ranked fifteenth in the ruuon 
will face PC. "Since its Spring Swing 
Weekend and since we are doing well, the 
team expects everyone to come out and 
watch us play on Saturday," said Co^h 
McKec. 



PC Baseball makes progress 

Brad Busbee 
SFOR rS EDITOR 

When the 1992 PC Baseball team 
began their spring season, their first 
game was played here at PC on the 
fifleenth of February against Union 
College. Union, from Kentucky, was 
able to defeat the Blue Hose in both 
games of the double header. Sopho- 
more Jeff Wilson attributed the loss to 
"Opening game jitters." Since that date 
PC's record shows their improvement. 
With a 1 1-14 record the Blue Hose see 
themsclvescomingintolheirown. Now, 
every player on the team is looking 
toward the conference tournament. 

The team is led by co-captains se- 
niorcatcher David Fields, junior shorts- center, and Joe Berubc in nghl. 
stopGregDesto, and junior pi tcher/DH, After their three game sweep over 

Robbie Waldrop. First base is played by Lcnior-Rhyne the Blue Hose are men- 
Brad Alewine. Second by Brian tally ready for their next conference 
Thompson, and third ba.se by Marcus game. "We are looking to playing 
Miller, while the outfield is manned by Wingate three games this weekend," 
Eric Hytinen in left. Julius Prince in said student a,ssisiant Matt Huntsbergcr. 




U PV player slides into first base. 



photo by Brian Koehlcr 



Co-captain Greg IX'sto said. "At llrsl 
we couldn't seem to make things click 
We would either hit the ball well and 
play average defense or we'd play great 
defense and do iin average jobof hilling. 
Now, we're playing up to our fX)tenlial. 
hverything is coming together. ' 



BLUK HOSK 

RECORD COLUMN 

Ras<^ball (11-14) 

K' .\ Newberry 4 

Allen 8, PC 5 

Hlon 7, PC I 

ElonlO, P(^() 

Elon 5, PCI 

U. of Pittsburg 10, K' 4 

New Hampshire Col. 7, PC 5 

#2 North Florida 8, K' 2 

Carson-Newman 14, PC 10 

PC 7, Carson -Newman .*> 

Ciu-son-Newman 8, PC 6 

Quincy 6, PC 4 

PC 6, Quincy I 

K' 4, Lenoir-Rhyne 1 

K: 4, Lenoir-Rhync 1 

l*C7,Unoir-Rhyiie 1 

West Virginia St. 7, K' 6 

Men's tennis(14-l 1) 

PCX.CIemson White I 
K' 9, Augusta 
PC 8,C;u-son-Newman I 
#18 Birmingham So. .S,K"4 
'^12 Wni.CarevXK'4 
#*) West Florida 6, PC 
K^ 7. Spring Hill I 
K" 6. #13 Flagler 3 

Women's tennis(y-6) 

Boston U. 9, PC O 

Stetson 6, PC 3 

Mobile 7. PC 2 

PC 7, Armsu-ong State 2 

PC 9, Elon 

PC 9. Catawba 

(iolf 

Tied for7lhoutof 14 icamsin Lenior- 
Rhync Invitational Tournament. 
3th out of 18 teams in Carson- 
Newman Persimmon Hill Tourney 



Golf team begins season 

by Kverett Catt;* 

STAFF WRITER 

The 1992 Presbyterian College Golf 
Team began its season earlier this month, 
On Miu^ch 2 and 3, the squad completed in 
the l.enoir Rhyne loumey. finishing lied 
for seventh out of 14 teams. Craig Stevens' 
>re of 1 39 was K' ' s best. K' finished fifth 
out of 18 teams m Saluda's Persimmon Hill 
Tourney, which was t)n March 16 and 17. 
the low man was kelly Yielding, with scores 
of 77 and 83 totaling 1 W). ( )n March 2 \ the 
Blue Hose finished lourth out of seven teams 
in the Richard Rendlcman Tourney at 
Catawba. Kelly Yielding and Brad Stevens 
tied with scores of 79. Brad Stevens was 
also named All-Tournameni 

The Blue Hose are lead by Coach Chucli 
King His team has the following players. 
Seniors Kelly Yielding, David Nelsi)n, Van 
Cato, Craig Stevens. Brad Fllenburg, and 
Bret Boulware. Sophomore Will Holmes 
and freshmen Brad Stevens, David 
McMillen.and Inp Bryan round up the rest 
of the squad. PC played North (ireenville 
College yesterday , and play in the Ciraysburg 
Hills Tourm'y in Chucky, Tennessee on 
March M) and 31 



Fraternity raises money and awareness for handicapped 



bv Camisha Clarke 

STAIT WRITER 

"Be strong enough tocare" is the slogan 
used by Pi Kappa Phi and People Under- 
suinding the Severely Handicafipcd (PUSH), 
.1 national service project founded and funded 
solely by the national Pi Kappa Phi frater- 
nity to raise money and awareness for the 
^lisabled. 

Throughout the year the members of Pi 
Kappa Phi, the only national fraternity in 
existence that has established a nauonal 
[>hilanthn)py, parucipaie in vanous aciivi- 
iies that not only raise money for PUSH but 
also create emotional, intellectual and 
physical accord with the severely mentally 
and physically handicap[>:d. Included in 
ihat list of acuvities is the annual PUSH-a- 
tlH)n in which fraternity brothers push a 
Ahoclchair around campus for 48 hours. 
Since 1977 when Pi Kappa Phi founded 
PUSH, every brother has developed some 
empathy for the handicapped. 

On Huirsday. March 19, and Fnday. 
March 20, the Presbyterian College chapter 
ol Pi Kappa Phi sponsored a PUSH-a-thon 
It K' with hopes of developing conmbu- 
iu)ns and sensibility within students and 
kiculty concerning daily su^uggles and ac- 
u»mplishmenLs of the handicapped. Fur- 
ilk" rmore, the fraiemiiy collected wheel- 
chairs from the Laurens County Hospital 
and the Whitien Center, a sch{X)l and home 
lor the severely mentally and physically 



handicapped, and every brother panicipatcd 
in one way or another. 

Along with the live brothers who rode 
in wheelchairs to classes, meals and all their 
other activities, other brothers took two- 
hour shifts at some time dunng the day or 
night to push these wheelchairs around 
campus. Both Stanton Smith, the Pi Kappa 
Phi PUSH Chairperson, and B.J. Cotircll 
organi/ed this activity. 

Completing a worthwhile project and 
given some support. Pi Kappa Phi raised 
approximately S3(K)from the PUSH-a-lhon, 
which raised its total of funds donated to 
PUSH this year to over $2000. Even with 
the success of this particular activity, there 
still remains the negative reali/auon of the 
inaccessibility lor the handicapped on this 
campus. 

Stanton Smith, who rcxie to meals in a 
wheelchair, clearly described the difficul- 
ties in the Greenville Dining Hall when he 
said, "It was just a big inconvenience." 
Although the dining hall has a ramp and a 
hiindicappcd diH>r lor an accessible enu^ance. 
some of the liKxis that Smith normally would 
have eaten were out of reach and, therelore, 
not eaten simply because the foods were 
placed too far out of reac h for a handicapped 
person, 

Another problem that confronted the 
PUSH participants was the confirmed inac- 
ce.s.sibility of the academic buildings at K'. 
All the brothers who rode to .lasses in a 
wheelchair agreed that Richardson Hall, 



Neville Hall, and Douglas House were un- 
workable for an unescorted handicapped 
person. The rear enhance to Richardson 
Hall has steps whose elevation makes im- 
possible for a person in a wheelchair to 
enter. Even the double dcx)rs in front are 
unworkable because It isextremely difficult, 
if at all possible, to hold open two doors 
simultaneously while pulling a wheelchair 
through them as well. Hence, die doorways 
are ttx) narrow. 

Neville Hall is also not well-equipped 
for a handicapped person. The presence of 
an elevator does not excuse the lack of 
suitable size. In fact, when one of the 
fraternity brothers made use of the elevator, 
the wheelchair fit mioihe elevator so joinUy 
that die elevator door actually scraped the 
wheelchair as it closed. 

Furthermore, reaching the adminisu-a- 
tive services of the Dean of Students, Coun- 
selors, and Direetor of Residence Life, as 
well as other faculties on the saond floor of 
Douglas House would be virtually impos- 
sible for a person in a wheelchau" because 
their IS no elevator as an alternative to the 
staircase. 

Having to attend classes in all of these 
inaccessible academic buildings raised the 
awareness of the Pi Kappa Phi brothers and 
BJ. CotU'ell, who rode in a wheelchair on 
Friday. Since he was unable to get into 
many of these buildings and classrooms, he 
and many others found it inconvenient to be 
carried up several steps. "Having to get help 



a lot of times makes you feel almost worth- 
less. That's a big blow to your ego and your 
dignity to have to have someone help you 
repeatedly throughout the day," saidCoitrell. 
Shamefaced and amazed, Cottrell also said, 
"I can only imagine what it would be like to 
have to go dirough that every day." 

In addiuon to the inaK:cessibility of the 
academic buildings, there also exists a need 
for some kind of facilities in all of die resi- 
dence halls except Georgia Hall, which 
contains an elevator that does not operate at 
all umes dunng the school year. Hence, a 
handicapped prospective student would be 
thoroughly discouraged by die numerous lack 
of facilities for the physically handicapped. 
Fortunately, accessibility has been discussed 
recenUy among faculty and administration, 
but no solution or path of action has been 
decided upon. How long will a student in a 
wheelchair outside of Douglas House have to 
wail before he can see the Dean of Students 
widi ease? 

The efforts of Pi Kappa Phi in the PUS H - 
a-lhon have hopefully removed die phobias 
and inhibitions that lie widiin e^h person 
and have enforced an empadiy toward the 
physically disabled. Although this fraternity 
was "not trying to touch any s(xe spots," there 
were still some negative reacuons as well as 
some encouraging support. Perhaps each 
person should consicter the advice of Cottrell 
when he said, "Don'i let your inhibitions get 
\hc best of you because, handicapped or not, 
we all have something to give." 



PC student to 'go for the extra mile' this summer for handicapped 



Press Ki'lease 

Oil K F OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

David Dixon could get a summer 
job and cam s(mie spending money lor 
his IK' Kt college year. That's what many 
of his fncnds will be doing when die 
spring semester ends m early May 

Instead, the Prcsbyienan College 
student has decided to do some travel 
itig. HeTI ix^dal 3.S(X) miles across die 
country on bicycle - but it won't be a 
sightseeing tour. No, he'll be "going die 
extra mile" for people with disabilities 

Dixtm. a junior Imni Cia'cnville. 
South Carolina, and a member of Pi 
Kappa Ptii Iratemity at PC, will join 49 
other students fmni colleges and univer- 
sities across the nation for a 62 day 
"Journey of Hoixv" I'he students are all 
memberx of Pi Kappa Phi chapters par- 
ticipating in PUSH America 

PUSH, an acronym for People Un 
derstanding die Severely Handicap|\d. 
was founded by Pi Kappa Phi fraienuiy 
to improve the lives of people with se 
verely handicapped conditions through 
service, viiluntcensm, education and 
awareness PUSH Inc. is a private, non 
profit t)rganization that lias served these 
s|X'cial individuals for more than 14 
years by raising more than $ I 7.S million 
by the Pi Kappa F^lii membership 

Another PC student. Dave 
Aucrcmann, participated in the PUSH 



Amenca ride dur- 
ing die summers of 
1990 and '91 -and 
Dixon was im- 
pressed by his fra- 
ternity brother's 
experience. 

"I've been cu- 
rious about PUSH 
America since I 
joined the frater- 
nity. Dave talked 
to me about it and. 
to be honest. I 
haven't spent a lot 
of my tinw d(»ing 
volunteer service. 
This. I thought, 
would be a gcxxl 
start. Hoik fully by 
doing this, I'll 
make sonx^biKly's 
hfc a little belter," 
said Dixon, the son 
of l>. and Mrs. J. 
Kelly Dixon of 21 
Bariram (irove, 
Cia'cnville 

The PUSH 
America partici 
pants will leave 
fnmi Washington. 
DC .. on June 15 
foraniiH* week trek 
to San Francisco. 




David Dixon will be riding across the 
country this summer in supfort of 
handicapped pfoplf. 



photo by Bnm KoehUr 



One team will travel a southern 
route, while the other - of which 
Dixon will be a nximber - travels 
a northern route. 

"I'll gel to know die odier 24 
guys on my team really well," he 
said "It's a gaxl diverse group 
from all over the country, and I 
look forward to being a part of 
it." 

In the days leading up to 
their travels, the team members 
will provide presentations on 
campuses and in communities 
helping odiers understand the is- 
sues facing those with disabUi- 
ties. After cycling an average of 
15 miles per day, the team will 
lake pan in many more presenta- 
tions and special events, often 
meeting with diose for whom 
they arc nding 

Besides raising awamess, 
PUSH America hopes to raise 
nKirc than $2(K),00() for future 
educational programs, with much 
of the money raised by the team 
member. Dixon and die other 49 
students must each raise a mmi- 
muni of $4{XK) to qualify 

Anytwie interested in going 
the extra mile " by making a tax- 
deduciible donation lo PUSH on 
David Dixon's behalf can con- 
tact him at 833-8646. 



FEATURES 



10 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



Cost of attending PC increases by $884 



by Jason West 
MANAGING EDITOR 



is the same percentage increase (6.5 per- 
cent) as last year's. "Last year, we experi- 
enced the lowest tuition increase percentage 
The cost of being a student at Presbyte- inl4ye^rs. We made every effort this year 
nan College is once again increasing. At its to keep it at the same level," he added. "By 
last meeting, the PC Board of Trustees gave comparison, last year a lot of public insti- 



approval to the new operating budget and 
fee schedule for the 1992-93 year. 

According to Dr. Kenneth Orr, PC 
president, the operating budget for the com- 
ing year is set at $19.6 million. Of that 



tulions were expenencmg tuiUon mcrcases 
of 10 percent or more." 

In the midst of rising college costs, Orr 
reports that he does see some positive things. 
'I loo am concerned about the rising cost of 



amount, $15.2 million (77 percent) will be attending college. It hits me in my pocket 
generated by tuition and fees. The remain- book like everyone else. However, it would 
ing $4.4 mil- ~ 



lion will come 
from endow- 
ments, gifts, 
andoihercon- 
tribulions. 



"/ too am concerned about the 

rising cost . . . It hits me in my pocket 

book like everyone else. " 



apjK'artome 
that a 

downsizing 
of increases 
is occur- 



nng," he said. 

Tuition and other fees for next year's "In the 1980's, PC experienced tuition 

PC students will increase by S884. Broken increases of 8 to 9 percent. In fact, one yc;ir 
down, that is a tuition increase of S382 per PC went over 1 1 percent. Unless wc have 
semester, a boarding fee increase of $48 per runaway intlauon, I don't .see that happcn- 
semester, and a general fee increase of $12 ing again. There are still going to be in- 



per semester. 

"Tuition increases arejustified because 
operating cost go up. The college attempts 
to keep PC wages competitive, so we budget 
in salary increases. There is an increase in 



creases, but the increases are going to be 
less," added Orr. 

"I don't know of anyone who enjoys a 
fee increase. PC has been operating with a 
balanced budget for the past decade because 



health insurance cost for our employees, we are not willing to operate m a deficit 

Utility increases are to be expected and situation. Deficits jcopordize the future of 

financial aid assistance increases also," said the institution. It is in everyone's best interest 

On. for students and parents to allow PC to 

Orr points out that this year's increase operate in the black," said Orr. 

A friend bids farewell to students and staff 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Several hundred people turned out la.st 
Tuesday at a re- 
ception to honor 
and bid farewell to 
a long-time mem- 
ber of the PC ad- 
ministration. 
Hubbard Rceder 
retired last week 
after .serving PC 
for thirteen years 
through the Pub- 
lic Safety Office. 
Guests at the re- 
ception included 
students, members 
of the Clinton 
community, andat 
least half of the 
Clinton Polrce 
Department, a tes- 
tament in itself to 
the respect Rceder 
has garnered dur- 
ing his time here. 
"You could tell he 
really enjoyed it," 

remarked Chief ' 

Grey Mason. "I 

was glad wc had the number of students and 

the people from the community." 

When Chief Mason rclicval "Rceder" 
for the last time early Tuesday morning, 
both parties had mixed emotions. "He has 
bo;n a very devoted and very faithful offi- 
cer," noted Mason. 'There have been times 
when all three of tlic officers were sick but 
wcrconihejobanyway. It's times like those 
when wc needed each other. He showed real 




OfTicer Hubbard Reeder 



devotion to his job and to the people here." 
Mason also added that beyond his duties as 
an officer, Rceder has been a dedicated 
friend to his co-workers. 

Prior to coming to 
PC, Rceder served 
twenty years in the 
U.S. Navy. He is a 
decorated veteran 
of the Korean and 
Vietnam Wars. He 
has received the 
Purple Heart, has 
been awarded the 
Bronze Medal 
three umes, and is 
a four-tinic recipi- 
ent ol the Good 
Conduct Medal. 
He spent a large 
portion of his tunc 
in the Navy as a 
military police- 
man. 

An officer is al- 
ready in training to 
fill the position 
Rceder is vacating. 
Mike Carbonncau 
has recently 
moved to the 
Clinton area after graduating Irorn tlic jk)- 
lice acackmy in Florida. "Mike has big 
shcx's to fill, and he realizes it," says Mason, 
Although he has officially retired, Rcctlcr 
plans to stay busy. He lias accepted a part 
time position as a security guard at Laurens 
High Sch(K)l. The job will allow him to 
continue doing wlwt he enjoys while Icav 
ing him more free time to spend wiili his 
grand.son Christopher. 




photo by Sieve Owens 



Dr. William Barron, son of N. G. Barron, was present at the dedicaticm of 
Barron Dorm this past Friday. 



Residence hall dedicated in honor 
of Columbia native N.G. Barron 



Press Relea.se 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

While attending Presbyterian Col- 
lege, the Reverend Narciso Gonzales 
Bam)nestablished an impressive history 
of service. Uponliisgraduationin 1^)13, 
that dedication to .service did not end as 
he entered the ministry and devoted his 
life to serving others until his death in 
1970. 

On Friday, March 20, Presbyterian 
College paid tnbute to the Coliiiiibia 
native by dedicating a new residence 
hall in his name. 

"Presbytenan College is pleased to 
dedicate this splendid residence hall to 
honor the memory of one of our alumni, 
N.G. Banx)n, for his long and effective 
service as a Presbyterian minister," PC 
President Kenneth B. Orr said. "He is 
fondly rc-mcmbord by his friends and 
family as a wann and gracious minister 
who served as a rc's{X'ctcd s[^)kesnKiiiof 
the gosjK'l for .^3 years," 

Rev. Barron, N)m 1911, was an 
active member of the studeni |-K)dy at 
Presbytenan College. He was a mem- 
IxTof Beta Kappa Iiatcmiiy, as well as 
the literary, scientific and joumalistic 
societies. In addition to serving on the 
newspaper and literary magazine staffs, 
he wasamenilx'rol the varsity football, 
basketball, ba.seball and Ixixing learns. 



Following his undergraduate career 
at PC, Rev. Barn)n received the B.D. 
degree from Columbia Theological 
Seminary in Virginia, 

Fnmi 1940 to UM.S. Barron served 
as a chaplain in the U.S. Army, and was 
the first chaplain to graduate from the 
U.S. Army Tactical School. He later 
served as minister of Presbytenan con- 
gregations in South Can)lina and Geor- 
gia, and gave 1 3 years of service lo the 
First Presbytenan Church in I-utala, 
Alabama, prior to his death, 

"Rev. Barron had a life ot service 
that was very genuine," said Fd 
Campbell, the college's director of de- 
velopment for major gihs. "PC would 
have a difficult time finding a graduate 
who better exemplified a coninuiment 
to service, h's appropriate thai wc honor 
him." 

Barn)n was the nephew oi N G. 
Gonzales, the first editor and manager 
of 7/ir Stale ne\vspa|X'r in Columbia. 
Among his lamily memlxrs who at- 
tended Friday's ceremonies were: his 
wife. Ruby Clarke Barmn of F.ufala, 
Alabama; his sister, Margaret Bmwnof 
Columbia; and his cliikhvn, I- Mutton 
Bam)nofBinmngham, Alabama, I ucie 
Gonzales Barmn Fggleston of Colum- 
bia, William Rowan Barnm of Knox 
ville, lennesee, and Sally Barron 
LaBadie of Ailania 



m, 

m 



1 RIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



11 



CAMPUS & CLUBS 



INTRAMIJR.XLS 

Ilic Inu^amural Department would like 
to thank all students, faculty, and .staff that 
participated in the 1992 Inu^amural basket- 
ball season. The champions were: women's 
league - Couture's Chaos, C league - (J)rg 
Jack, B le;»gue - DFA, and A league - Su- 
preme Court. In the other sponsconcluding 
in February, Ike Dickey defeated Mark Evans 
10 win the I MSinglcsTcnnis Championship. 
Willi only Softball and swimming Ich to 
play this .spring, Sigma Nu and The taChi are 
tied in the race for the all sports uophy. 

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY 

A group of Habitat volunteers spent 
iheir Spnng Break in Pen.secola, Florida 
working on a local Habitat project Thanks 
lo Dean Nixonand student volunteers: Laura 
Siniih. LeJeanna Maddox, Ron Mixon, Phil 
i;irich, Chuck Conrad, Adrcana Villabos, 
Mana Albaney, Billy H{X)per. Minh Vu 
Nguych, and Ron Hull. 

Coiigratukuu)ns to our new officers! 
Wc arc kx)king to a great year. (Presidcnt- 
LeJeanna Maddox, Vicc-President-Ron 
Hull, Corresponding Secrciiiry-Jcnnifcr 
Gordon, Recording Secretary -Margaret 
Johnson, Treasurer-Mark Hunt, Spokesper- 
son/Sfvcial Projects-Erica Durham) 

Mark Apnl 25 on your calender! HabiUil 
will he s[X)nsoring a fundraiser that will be 
an all day band ct)nccrt - BANDBLAST! 
Cici cxciicd! Great music! Great people! 
Great fun! 



STIDKNT AFFAIRS 

Mr, Lennard Jorgensen has been re- 



tained by the college to provide professional 
counseling for PC students. Mr. Jorgensen 
will be on campus from 1 :(X) to 5:(X) pm 
Wednesdays for the remainder of this se- 
mester. Appoinuncnts may be made by 
calling cxtcntion 8378 or 8379. Jorgensen 
has completed all course work toward a 
Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology and is 
cunenily working on his di.ssertation. He 
has experience in individual and group 
counseling and has recently completed a 
one year internship program at USC Colum- 
bia. 

CAMP COUNSFLORS COURSE 

Recreation Lx-adcrship, a May 25-30 
course, is a unique opportunity to prepare 
for camp work. It provides skills and re- 
sources in games and scxial recreation, song 
leading, and Folk and Square Dancing. In 
addiuon, attention is given to puppeu-y, the 
philosophies of camping, and how to work 
with special groups such as the mentally 
retarded and elderly. 

Since class is held at lea.st 8 periods a 
day, most of the written homework is com- 
pleted following a syllabas which is avail- 
able from the msU-uclor. Fnrollmenl is 
limited to 12 so that each student has enough 
leadership time to develop skills in class. 
Religion 326 is taught by Dr, Jack Prcs.seau, 
who can be reached at home (833-3531) 
where he is working on a sabbatical project 
or, on Monday and Thursday alternoon, at 
his office (833-8382). 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

A belated congratulations to our new 



pledges: Brian Inman, Lance Dauby , Robby 
Stargell, Blake Stonzell, Ryan Brown, Jamie 
Smith, Gary Smith, John Broadway, Ben 
Biggar, Tim "Shemp"Sheppard, and Tommy 
Hamey. 

Elections were held Tuesday, February 
25. Our new officers are: SMC-DaveWahn, 
IMC-Tim Davis, THC-Mike Bell, SC-Ted 
Chapin, MC-Todd Shearer, Social-Brad 
Wildes, Pledge Tyrants-J.D. Johnson and 
Brad Palmer, Hou.sc Chairman-Nathan 
Sncllings, Fund Raiser-Bnan Rogers, Rush- 
Greg Owens, Historian-Jim McClary, IFC 
Reps- Mike Fletcher and Bnan Thomas, 
Rick-John Edwards, Alumni Rclauons-John 
Crawford, Inuamurals-Will Robinson, Fire 
Marshall-Alex Hormone, Community Ser- 
vice-Mike Mathis. 

Dream Girl was a great weekend! The 
brotherhood heartily congratulates our new 
Dream Girt, Malia Collar. "Projectile 
Award" goes out to Robby Stargell. 

Thank you lo all Zeias who came out 
last weekend. Timewarp was incredible. 
You guys are great to party with. Please 
continue coming out. 

ALPHA DELTA PI 

The sisters of Alpha Delta Pi would like 
to congratulate all of our new officers. We 
would also like to welcome our new mem- 
bers into full Delta membership. We are so 
proud of all of you, and we love you all very 
much, Recendy initiated Delta members 
are: Katherine Bonn;"r, Lisa Bruce, Natasha 
Ca.sada, A very Cheve >, Ann Dodd, Eliz,abeih 
Gilbert, Holly Harper, Jennifer Hams, Leigh 
Heamburg, Kale Ashby Lawton, Alice 



World premiere scheduled for PC stage 



Press Release 

OITICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Asa boy, Richie Proschwouldduutully 
accompany his family lo visit Rose Sophie 
Sucksiorl, his father's great aunt. Like 
many trips to .see older family members, ii 
was filled with suirics m Rose's living ra)m 
- not exactly a gn)wing boy's ideal way to 
s|K'ikI an altem(X)n, 

As he grew older, however, Prosch be- 
ciunc fascinated with tlie uiles and anecdotes, 
and toiind time in his schedule lo visit Rose 
at her homo in Bl(H)inlield, Nebraska, While 
compiling three children's lHH)ks about the 
stories, the free-lance writer and arust was 
suddenly sUuck by ;in idea lo give jx-rma 
ncncc to his relative's stones - a dramatic 
presentation entiiled "Ihe Last Rose of 
Summer" that will make its world premiere 
Thursday. April 2, at Presbyterian College 's 
Edmunds Hall 

"Two years ago when I was putung 
ti)getlier the children's btK)ks, I realized that 
there were some of Rose 's stones that didn ' i 
fit. They were eillier tm) adiili or tiH) short 
for a txK)k," Prosch siiid. " Ihis dramatic 
presentation seemed the best place for them. 
It really isn't a play or simply an oral ink'r 
preuiiion. There is st)me drama, some 
comedy pieces, narrauve storytelling, and 
pieces acted out, I think it will be dillereni 
from anything |x*ople have seen raently. 

Along with his wife Gina. an English 



insuuctor at Presbytenan College. Prosch 
hopes to share some of his relauve's spirit 
and love of a gixxl story. Bom in 1897 in 
Dennison, Iowa. Rose's family moved to a 
farm in Bl(x>mfield when she was 10, She 
worked at several busines.ses m town and 
finally married Harr> Suckslorf, ihe town 
pharmacist, at the age ol 35. The couple 
traveled I requenily. allowing Rose to add to 
her ules. until Harry died in 1968. Rose 
died on Mareh 28. 1991 . at the age of 93 

"The reason I' ve always found Rose so 
fascinating is that she was always ahead of 
her lime and lived such a full life. She 
worked around these German fanners and 
earned their resp^-cl. which was unheard ol 
for a woman of her Uine. Plus, she basically 
saw the 20ih century dunng her life. The 
persixctive she could give you was incrci!- 
ible." said Prosch. 

Prosch said he could not even gue.ss ihe 
nuink-r of stones he he;ird while siiung in 
Rose's living r(X)m However, he said he 
will never forget the envimnment in which 
they were told - an environment he hojvs to 
recreate during the show 

"The L Ast Rose of Summer" will explore* 
Rose's life through the dramatic retelling 
and discussion o\ six energeuc yams. 

"The La.st Rose of Summer" will begin 
at 8:15 pm in Edmunds Hall on April 2. 
There is no admission charge and the public 
IS mviicd. 



Leach, Kelly Reiser, Katherine Rhame, Jen- 
nifer Roach, Katy Ross, Ashley Small, Jenny 
Wallace, and Ashley Williams. Diamond 
Days were very special! Thanks goes out to 
everyone who has helped with Tccter-Totter 
for the Ronald McDonald House. Everyone 
had fun m the spu^it of service. 

We are looking forward to our annual 
Senior Roast and making memories at Black 
Diamond Ball. Thanks for a great semester 
sisters! 

THETA CHI 

The Brothers of Theta Chi would like to 
congratulate all of the new officers: Presi- 
dent Ben Jones, Vice President Jay Pullin, 
Secretary Todd Carbry, Chaplain Chad Smith, 
Treasurer Lee Edenfield and Pledge Marshall 
Harrison Jones. 

Several brothers recently went to Flonda 
State for the Annual National Theta Chi Con- 
vention. Gcxxl luck to goalie Bret Boulware, 
who will be representing the Blue Hose at the 
NAIA Senior Bowl. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

The brothers of Kappa Alpha Order want 
to congratulate our new officers for the 1992- 
93 school year. They are: Michael Key - 1; 
Charles Cannon - II; William Stover - III; 
Frank McKay - IV; Bud Martin - V; Neil 
Hunter - VI; Jay Quanu - VII; Ue Neel IV - 
VIII; and Ron Mixon - IX. Thank you to our 
old officers for a great year and outstanding 
leadership. 



PC Choir to perform Spring Concert 



The Presbyterian College Choir will 
present its Spring Concert on Thursday, 
Apnl 9, at 8:15 pm in Edmunds Hall. The 
public IS invited to attend this free program. 

The forty-voice choir has recently 
relumed from its Spring Tour to churches 
in South Carolina. Georgia, and Flonda. 
Dr. Charles T. Gaines, Charles A Dana 



Schickele). 

Two senior choir members, Kath> 
Kennedy and David Puts, will be gues 
conductors for two pieces. Kennedy ha« 
selected the Amencan Folk Song "The Watei 
is Wide" and Pitts will conduc 
'Charlottown." From the humorous "Song* 
Me in Grossmama Sang" by Lloyd Pfautsch 



I A i ;l H 11 1( H h n « 



PC Choir 



file photo 



Professor of Music, is conducicr of the 
choir. 

The concen will be an all American 
program. Music by Amencan compt>sers 
from Revolutionary War days up to the 
present will K* heard. Two compositions 
by the most original early Amencan com- 
poser. William Billings, will be performed. 
Two tunes by Stephen Foster will be sung 
along with folk song arrangements and 
spintuals. 

Other composers to be heard arc 
Charles Ives and P.D.Q. Bach (or PctCT 



the chou- will sing "Fraulem Bo-Pcepen" 
and "Jack and Jill." 

Soloists will bcLawana Lcroy, David 
Long. David Pitts, and Elizabeth Bryan. 
Accompanists will be Christy Smithcrman, 
Rebecca Hent/., Siacey Peters, and Mrs. 
Nancy Von Hollcn. 

During the concert the Choir and 
members of the Lectures and Fine Arts 
Committee will honor Dr. David 
Moorefield. professor of phitosophy and 
Coordinator of LFA. Moorefield will re- 
tire at the end of this academic year. 



FEATURES 



10 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



Cost of attending PC increases by $884 



by Jason West 
MANAGING EDITOR 

The cost of being a student at FYcsbytc- 
rian College is once again increasing. At its 
last meeting, the PC Board of Trustees gave 
approval lo the new operating budget and 
fee schedule for the 1992-93 year. 

According to Dr. Kenneth Orr, PC 
president, the operating budget for the com- 
ing year is set at $19.6 million. Of that 

amount, $15.2 million (77 percent) will be attending college. It hits me in my pcxkct 
generated by tuition and fees. The remain- book like everyone else. However, it would 
ing $4.4 mil- ~ 



is the same percentage increase (6.5 per- 
cent) as last year's. "Last year, we experi- 
enced the lowest tuition increase percentage 
in 14 years. We made every effort this year 
to keep it at the same level," he added. "By 
comparison, last year a lot of public insti- 
tutions were experiencing tuition increases 
of 10 percent or more." 

In the m idst of rising college costs, Orr 
reports that he does see some positive things. 
'I loo am concerned about the rising cost of 



"I too am concerned about the 

rising cost . . . It hits me in my pocket 

book like everyone else. " 



lion will come 
from endow- 
ments, gifts, 

and other con- 

iribulions. 

Tuition and other fees for next year's 
PC students will increase by S884. Broken 
down, that is a tuition increase of S382 per 
semester, a boarding fee increase of S48 per 
semester, and a general fee incrca.se of S12 
per semester. 

"Tuitionincreasesarejustifiedbecau.se 
operating cost go up. The college attempts 



appear to me 
that a 

downsizing 
of increases 
is occur- 



ring," he said. 

"In the 1980's, PC experiencetl tuition 
increases of 8 to 9 percent. In fact, one year 
PC went over 1 1 percent. Unless wc have 
runaway inflation, 1 don't see that happen- 
ing again. There are still going to be in- 
creases, but the increases are going to be 
less," added Orr. 

"I don't know of anyone who enjoys a 
to keep PC wages competitive, so we budget fee increase. PC has been operating with a 



in salary increases. There is an increase in 
health insurance cost for our employees. 
Utility increases are to be expected and 
financial aid assistance increases also," said 
Orr. 

Orr points out that this year's increase 



balanced budget for the past daadc because 
we are not willing to operate in a deficit 
situation. Deficits jeopordi/.e the future of 
the institution. It isineveryone's best interest 
for students and parents to allow PC lo 
operate in the black," said Orr. 



A friend bids farewell to students and staff 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Several hundred people turned out last 
Tuesday at a re- 
ception to honor 
and bid farewell lo 
a long-time mem- 
ber of the rc ad- 
minisiration. 
Hubbard Reeder 
retired last week 
after serving PC 
for thirteen years 
through the Pub- 
lic Safely Office. 
Guests at the re- 
ception included 
students, members 
of the Clinton 
community, and at 
least half of the 
Clinton Police 
Department, a tes- 
tament in itself to 
the respect RcA;der 
has garnered dur- 
ing his ume here. 
"You could tell he 
really enjoyed it," 

remarked Chief ' 

Grey Mason. "I 

was glad wc had the number of students and 

the people from ihe community." 

When Chief Mason relieved "Recdcr" 
for the last time early Tuesday morning, 
both parties had mixed emotions. "He has 




OfTicer Hubbard Reeder 



devotion to his job and to the people here." 
Mason also added that beyond his duties as 
an officer, Reeder has been a dedicated 
friend to his co-workers. 

Prior to coming to 
PC, Reeder served 
twenty years in the 
U.S. Navy. He is a 
decorated veteran 
of the Korean and 
Vietnam Wars. He 
has received the 
Purple Heart, has 
been awarded the 
Bronze Medal 
three umes, and is 
a four-time recipi- 
ent of the Good 
Conduct Medal. 
He spent a large 
portion of his time 
m the Navy as a 
military police- 
man. 

An officer is al- 
ready in training to 
fill the position 
Reeder is vacating. 
Mike Carbonneau 
has recently 
moved to the 
Clinton area after graduating from ilic [Ma- 
lice academy in Florida. "Mike has big 
shoes to fill, and he realizes it," says Mason 
Although he has officially retired, Reeder 
plans lo stay busy. He lias accepted a part- 



file phoU) 




photo by Sieve Owens 



Dr. William Barron, .son of N. G. Barron, was present at the deditati(m of 
Barron Dorm this past Friday. 



Residence hall dedicated in honor 
of Columbia native N.G. Barron 



been a very devoted and very faithful offi- time position as a security guard at Laurens 

ccr," noted Mason. 'There have been times High Sch(X)l. The job will allow him lo 

when all three of ihe officers were sick but continue doing what he enjoys while leav- 

were on the job any way. It's times like those ing him more free time to sfx'nd with his 

when we needal each other. He showed real grand.son Christopher. 



Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

While attending Prc-sbyterian Col- 
lege, the Revererul Narciso Gon/ales 
BamMiestablished an impressive history 
ofservicc. Upon his graduation in 1').!^, 
that dedication to service did not end as 
he entered the ministry and devoted his 
life to serving others until his death in 
1970. 

On Friday, March 20, Presbyterian 
College paid tnbute to the Columbia 
native by dedicating a new residence 
hall in his name. 

"Presbyterian College is pleased to 
dedicate this splendid residence hall to 
honor the memory of one of our alumni, 
NO. Fiarn)n, lor his long and elTcciive 
service as a Presbyterian minister," PC 
President Kenneth H Orr said. '4Ie is 
fondly rememlx-rd by his friends and 
family as a wann and gracious minister 
who served as a a-six'tled s[X)kesman of 
the gosfx'l fi)r }} years" 

Rev. Barron, \xm\ I'Ml, was an 
active memlx-r of the student N)dy at 
F*resbytenan College. He was a mem- 
ber of Beta Kappa Frateniiiy, as well as 
the literary, scientific and journalistic 
societies, hi addition to serving on the 
newspaper and literary magazine staffs, 
hewasamembi-rol Ihe varsity football, 
basketball, ba.seball and lx)xing teams. 



Following his undergraduate career 
at PC, Rev. Banon received the B.D. 
degree from Columbia Theological 
Seminary in Virginia 

From 194010 194.S. Barron served 
as a chaplain in the U.S. Army, and was 
the first chaplain to graduate from the 
U.S. Army Tactical Sc1h)oI. He later 
served as minister of Presbyterian con- 
gregations in South Carolina and Geor- 
gia, and gave 1 ^ years of setA'Ke to Ihe 
First Presbyterian Cluirch in Fiitala, 
Alabama, prior to his death. 

"Rev. Barron had a life of service 
that was very genuine," said Fd 
Cainplx'll. the college's director of de- 
velopment fi»r ma)or gifis. "PC would 
have a difficult lime finding a graduate 
who Ix'tler CKempliflrd a commilmenl 
to service. It 's approf )riate ihat we honor 
him." 

Barn)n was the nephew of N.G. 
(Jonzales, the first editor and manager 
of Ihv Suite newspafXT in Cohinihia. 
Among his family memlxis who at- 
tended Friday's ceremonies were: his 
wife, Ruby Clarke Barron of Fuifala. 
Alabama; his sister, Margaret Ikownof 
Columbia; and his i hildn-n, F llutlon 
Barn)nol Bmnmgham. Alabama,! ucie 
Gonzales Barron I-ggleston ol Colum- 
bia, William Rowan Barron of Km«- 
ville, lenncsee. and Sally Barron 
LaBadie of Atlam.i 



I 



f 

i 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



11 



CAMPUS & CLUBS 



INTRAMURALS 

17ic Inu^amural Department would like 
to thank all students, faculty, and staff thai 
pariicipatcd in the 1992 Inuamural basket- 
ballseason. The champions were: women's 
league - Couture' s Chaos, C league - Org 
Jack, B league - DFA, and A league - Su- 
preme Court. In the other sports concluding 
in February, Ike Dickey defeated Mark Evans 
to win the IM Singles Tennis Championship. 
Willi only Softball and swimming Icfi to 
play this spring, SigmaNu and The taChi are 
tied in the race for the all sports trophy. 

HAUn AT FOR HLMANITY 

A group of Habitat volunteers spent 
their Spnng Break in Pensecola, Florida 
working on a IcKal Habitat project Thanks 
to Dean Nixon and student volunteers: l^ura 
.Siiiiih, LeJeanna Maddox, Ron Mixon, Phil 
Ulrich, Chuck Conrad, Adreana Viilabos, 
Mana Albaney, Billy Hcx)per. Minh Vu 
Nguych.and Ron Hull. 

Congratulations to our new officers! 
Wc are hK)king to a great year. (Prcsuleni- 
LeJeanna Maddox, Vice-Presidenl-Ron 
Hull, Corresponding Secretary-Jennifer 
Gordon, Recording Secretary Margaret 
Jt)h!ison, Treasurer-Mark Hunt, Spokesper- 
son/Special Projecls-Erica Durham) 

Mark Apnl 25 on your calender! Habitat 
will be s[X)nsoring a fundraiser that will be 
an all day band conceit - BANDBLAST! 
Get excited! Great music! Great people! 
Great fun! 



STIDKNT AFFAIRS 

.Mr. l.ennard Jorgen.sen has been re- 



tained by the college to provide professional 
counseling for PC students. Mr. Jorgcnsen 
will be on campus from 1:(X) lo 5:(X) pm 
Wednesdays for the remainder of this se- 
mester. Appointments may be made by 
calling exicnuon 8378 or 8379. Jorgcnsen 
has completed all course work toward a 
Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology and is 
currently working on his dissertation. He 
has expenence in individual and group 
counseling and has recently completed a 
one year internship program at use Colum- 
bia. 

CAMP COUNSELOR'S COURSE 

Recreation Lxadership, a May 25-30 
course, is a unique opportunity to prepare 
for camp work. It provides skills and re- 
sources in games and scKial recrciiuon, song 
leading, and Folk and Square Dancing. In 
addiuon, attenuon is given to puppeuy, the 
philosophies of camping, and how to work 
with special groups such as the mentally 
retarded and elderly. 

Since class is held at laist 8 pericxls a 
day, most of the wntten homework is com- 
pleted following a syllabas which is avail- 
able from the insu-ucior. Enrollment is 
limited to 1 2 so that each student has enough 
leadership time to develop skills m class. 
Religion 326 is taught by Dr. Jack Prcs.seau. 
who can be reached at home (833-3531) 
where he is working on a sabbatical project 
or, on Monday and Thursday afternoon, at 
his office (833-8382). 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

A belated congratulations lo our new 



pledges: Brian Inman, Lance Dauby, Robby 
Stargell, Blake Sionz.ell, Ryan Brown, Jamie 
Smith, Gary Smith, John Broadway, Ben 
B!ggar,Tim"Shemp"Sheppard,andTommy 
Harney. 

Elections were held Tuesday, February 
25. Our new officers are: SMC-DaveWahn, 
IMC-Tim Davis, THC-Mike Bell. SC-Ted 
Chapin, MC-Todd Shearer, Social-Brad 
Wildes. Pledge Tyranis-J.D. Johnson and 
Brad Palmer, Hou.sc Chairman-Nathan 
Sncllings, Fund Raiscr-Bnan Rogers, Rush- 
Greg Owens, Hisiorian-Jim McClary, IPC 
Reps-Mike Fletcher and Brian Thomas, 
Rick-John Edwards, Alumni Relauons-John 
Crawford, Inu-amurals-Will Robinson, Fuc 
Marshall-Alex Hormone, Community Ser- 
vice-Mike Mathis. 

Dream Girl was a great weekend! The 
brotherhood heartily congratulates our new 
Dream Girl, Malia Collar. "Projectile 
Award" goes out lo Robby Stargell. 

Thank you to all Zeias who came out 
last weekend. Timewarp was incredible. 
You guys are great to party with. Please 
continue coming out. 

ALPHA DELTA PI 

The sisters of .'\lpha Delta Pi would like 
to congratulate all of our new officers. We 
would al.so like to welcome our new mem- 
bers into full Delta membership. We are so 
proud of all of you, and we love you all very 
much. Recendy initialed Delta members 
are: Katherme Bonner, Lisa Bruce, Natasha 
Casada, Avery Cheves, Ann Dodd, Eliz.abeth 
Gilbert, Holly Harper, Jennifer Harris, Leigh 
Heamburg, Kate Ashby Lawton, Alice 



World premiere scheduled for PC stage 



Press Release 

OFFKT-: OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Asa boy, Richie Proschwoukiduiifully 
accom[)any his family to visit Rose Sophie 
Sucksiorl, his father's great aunt. Like 
many trips lo see older family members, it 
was filled wiih stones in Rose's living rix>m 
- not exactly a growing boy's ideal way to 
s[K"nd an altern(X)ri. 

As he grew i)lder, however, Prosch be- 
came lascinaied with the tales and anecd»>tes. 
and louiid time in his schedule to visit Rose 
at her home m HliHunfield, Nebraska While 
compiling three children's lxx)ks alx)ul llie 
stones, the free-laixe writer and arust was 
suddenly slriK'k by an idea to give perma- 
nence to his relative's stories • a dramatic 
presentation entitled "Ihe Last Rose of 
Summer" that will nuike iLs world jwcmiere 
Ilmrstlay, April 2, at l*resbyierian College's 
lulniunds Hall. 

"I'wo years ago when 1 was puiung 
logeiher the children's b<H)ks, 1 realized that 
there were some of Rose's stones ihai didn't 
fit They were* either Kx) adult or Ux) short 
lor a b<K)k.' Prosvh said. "I'his dr;unalic 
presentation seemed the best place for ihem. 
It re^illy isn't a play or simply an oral inter 
prciation. There is st)me drama, some 
comedy pieces, narrative storytelling, and 
pieces acted out. I think it will be dilfereni 
from anything people have seen recently. 

AliMig with his wife Gma an English 



instructor at Presbyterian College, Prosch 
hopes to share some of his relauve's spirit 
and love of a g(xxl story. Bom m 1897 in 
Denmson. Iowa, Rose's family moved to a 
farm in Bkxnn field when she was 10. She 
worked at several busine.s.ses in town and 
finally married Harry Sucksiorf, the town 
pharmacist, at the age of 35. ITie couple 
traveled frequently, allowing Rose to add lo 
her tales, until Han-y died m 1968. Rose 
died on March 28, 1991 , at the age of 9 ^^ 

"The reason I've always found Rose >i. 
fascinating i^ that she was always ahead of 
her time and lived such a full life. She 
worked around these German famiers and 
earned their resjx-ci, which was unheard of 
for a woman of her ume. Plus, she basically 
saw the 2()ih century during her life. The 
perspective she could give you was incred- 
ible," said Pa)sch 

l\osch siud ho could not even guess the 
number of stones he ho;ud while situng in 
Rose's living nx)m However, he said he 
will never forget the envimnment in which 
they were told - an environment he hopes to 
recreate during the show. 

"The Last Roseof Summcr"willexplore 
Rose's life through the dramatic retelling 
and discussuMi of six energetic yams, 

"The Last Rose of Summer" will K'gin 
at 8:15 \m in Edmunds Hall on April 2. 
There is no admission charge and the public 
IS invited. 



Leach, Kelly Reiser, Katherine Rhame, Jen- 
nifer Roach, Katy Ross, Ashley Small, Jenny 
Wallace, and Ashley Williams. Diamond 
Days were very special! Thanks goes out to 
everyone who has helped with Teeter-Totter 
for the Ronald McDonald House. Everyone 
had fun in the spirit of service. 

We are looking forward to our annual 
Senior Roast and making memories at Black 
Diamond Ball. Thanks for a great semester 
sisters! 

THETA CHI 

The Brothers of Theia Chi would like to 
congratulate all of the new officers: Presi- 
dent Ben Jones, Vice President Jay Pullin, 
Secretary Tcxld Carbry , Chaplain Chad Smith , 
Treasurer Lee Edenfield and Pledge Marshall 
Harrison Jones. 

Several brothers recently went to Florida 
Slate for the Annual National Theia Chi Con- 
vention. Good luck to goalie Bret Boulwarc, 
who will be representing the Blue Hose at the 
NAIA Senior Bowl. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

The brothers of Kappa Alpha Order want 
to congratulate our new officers for the 1992- 
93 schcxjl year. They are: Michael Ivey - 1; 
Charles Cannon - II; William Stover - III; 
Frank McKay - IV; Bud Martin - V; Neil 
Hunier - VI; Jay Quaniz - VII; Lee Neel IV - 
VIII; and Ron Mixon - IX. Thank you to our 
old officers for a great year and outstanding 
leadership. 



PC Choir to perform Spring Concert 



The Presbyterian College Choir will 
present its Spring Concert on Thursday. 
Apnl 9. at 8:15 pm in Edmunds Hall. The 
public IS invited lo attend this free program. 

The forty-voice chou- has recently 
relumed from its Spnng Tour to churches 
in South Carolina. Georgia, and Flonda. 
Dr. Charles T. Gaines, Charles A Dana 






Schickeic). 

Two senior choir members. Kathy 
Kennedy and David Puts, will be gues 
ciMiductors for two pieces. Kennedy ha* 
selected the Amencan Folk Song "The Watei 
is Wide" and Pills will conduc 
"Charloiiown." From the humorous "Song? 
Mem Grossmama Sang" by Lloyd Pfaulsch 



r. 



»t A niiui II h )i Ji A fcH 



PC Choir 



file photo 



Professor of Music, is conductcr of the 
choir. 

The concert will be an all Amencan 
program. Music by Amencan composers 
from Revolutionary War days up to ihc 
present will be heard. Two compositions 
by the most original early Amencan com- 
poser, William Billmgs, will be performed. 
Two tunes by Stephen Foster will be sung 
along with folk song arrangements and 
spiniuals. 

Other composers to be heard are 
Charles Ives and P.D.Q. Bach (tw Pcicr 



the choir will sing "Fraulem Bo-Peepcn" 
and "Jack and Jill." 

Soloists will be Lawana Lcroy. David 
Long, David Puts, and Elizabeth Bryan 
Accompanists will t)c Chnsty Smitherman. 
Rebecca Henu, Staccy Peters, and Mrs. 
Nancy Von Hollcn. 

Dunng the concert the Choir and 
members of the Latures and Fine Arts 
Committee will honor Dr. David 
Moorefield. professor of philosophy and 
Coordinator of LEA. Moorefield will rc- 
tu-c at the end of thts academic year. 




ENTERTAINMENT 12 



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1992 



Dreams So Real headlining tonight at SUB Spring Swing 

Press Release met vocalist/bassist Trent Allen and drum- After Day"; "Stand Tall," a rocker aug- steal." 

ATHENS, GA mer Drew Worsham in a local Athens record mented by the guest appearance of B-52 Perhapsitwouldbcappropriatetothink 



Press Release 

ATHENS, GA 

'There's no time to sleep, just stand and 
deliver," Dreams So Real challenges in one 
of their newest songs, "You and the River," 
and as 1992 begins they seem posed to 
accomplish just that. You may already 
know Dreams So Real's penchant for 
blending muscular with the melodic, yet no 
one could have imagined the maturation and 
diversity of the group since the release of 
their first major label album in 1988. But a 
listen to the power-pop trio in 1992 might 
convince you otherwise. "This is a group 
that has not reached it's peak," says Russell 
Carter, the groups iongtinic allorncy and 
advisor. From the rousing rocker "Eye to 
Eye," to the country-pop tlavor of "The 
Ballad of Bobby Rose," or from the sm(X)th 
mainsu-eam sound of "Last Go Round" to 
the emotive, anihcmic "Jump m the Fire," 
Dreams So Real is ready to deliver it's 
su-ongcsi album yet. This is a group who has 
the advantage of being known across the 
country and in the mdusu-y and is posal to 
make a .suong impact at radio. 

In 1985 vocalist/guitarist Barry Marlcr 



met vocalist/bassist Trent Allen and drum- 
mer Drew Worsham in a local Athens record 
store and shortly thereafter released an inde- 
pendent (Coyote/Twin tone) Peter Buck 
produced single "Everywhere Girl" which 
climbed CNU's New Music Report and be- 
came the best selling single in the label's 
history. The group followed that in 1986 
when Buck produced Father s House, an 
album Musician Magazine called "...as 
promising a debut as you're likely to hear." 

In 1988 the group released their first 
major label album Rouf>h Ni^ht in Jericho, 
which garnered them extensive AOR as 
well as alternative airplay in addiUon to 
videoairplay on MTV and TBS with the uile 
track and with "Bearing Wimcss". The 
album firmly esuibli.shed the group as one of 
the most promising acts of the future while 
tiiking their trademark vocal harmonies and 
song craftsmanship nationwide and even 
across llic Atlantic into Europe. 

1990's Glory line proved that Jericho 
was no llukc. The group showed maturity 
and diversity with songs like - the title track, 
a chilling talc of a child's awakening lo the 
cruel presence of racial prejudice; the bril- 
liant renuike of the Badfinger classic "Day 



After Day"; "Stand Tall," a rocker aug- 
mented by the guest appearance of B-52 
Cindy Wilson; and finally the sardonic, 
southern anthem "Overton Park/ Faith," 
which urges the naive to "...buy faith, it's a 



steal." 

Perhaps it would be appropriate to think 
of Dreams So Real as a steal. For surely the 
best IS yet to come from these Georgia 
rockers. 




Dreams So Real will be the headlininj< group at ttmight's .Spring Swing. 
Admission to the concert is free for PC students. 



flic phnto 



Dillon Fence to be featured at SUB Spring Swing concert 



Press Release 

CHAPEL HILL, NC 

You'll like the guys in Dillon Fence. 
Everybody likes the guys in Dillon Fence. 
They're the sort of guys you would intro- 
duce to your sister or let borrow your car 
without hesitation. They live m Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina and take their name from a 
folk art environment/junkyard in nearby 
Dillon, South Carolina. Dillon Fence are 
four, good looking, nice guys who chum out 
absolutely irresistible pop songs with more 
than a little R & B llavor. Pop songs with a 
universal appeal, stemming from what the 
the Washin^ion Posi'a Geoffrey Himes 
recognized as Dillon Fence's "ability to 
make the small, ordinary evens seem as 
momentous as they do in the midstof teenage 
innocence." 

Dillon Fence consist of Greg 
Humphreys, Kent Aphin, Chris G(K)de, and 
Scdt Carle. 

Rosmary is Dillon Fence's extraordi- 
nary debui album, expertly prcxluced by 
Ron St. Germain for Mammoth Records. 



You'll get "fenced in" by the instantly 
catchy guitar hook of "Summer," the in- 
fectious soul of "I Will Break," and the 
simple, h(X)ky charm of "Mwkingbird." 
Rosemary is eleven .songs under a groove 
- orchestrated and driven by Greg 
Humphrey's smooth, soulful vocals. 



Rosemary'^ melodic guiuir sound is 
clear and bright - no grunge. Roserruiry is 
guitar, bass and drums you will want lo 
dance to - no drum machines, synihesizere 
or indusuial machine racket. Rosenuiry is 
real live pop-soul tunes and quality musi- 
cianship - no samples. The sincere, radio- 




Spring Swing band, Dillon Fence, inc 
Kent Alphin, Chris (loode and Seolt 



photo courtesy of Mammoth Kecorils 

ludes band members (ireg Humphreys, 
( arle. 



friendly, sing-in-the-shower kind of tunes 
that you, your mom and your kid sister arc 
apt to like. 

People instantly respond to Dillon 
Fence's honest approach, clean image and 
monster pop hcxiks. The band has broken all 
attendance raords at North Carolina clubs, 
sold 8,()(K) copies of its self-marked LP and 
packed 'em in at colleges and clubs through- 
out the Southeast with delirious, dancing 
cmwds. Even Ron St. Germain, a veteran 
engineer/prcxlucer who has worked with 
everyone from U2, The Cure, and Mick 
Jagger lo Sonic Youth, Bad Brains, and 
Soundgarden, IS so excited about these guy s 
thai he's been using his pih)i license lo lly in 
for their shows, jump on stage and adil some 
tambourine to ihe dance parly. 

Dillon F'cnce will ho leatureil luinglu at 
ihcanmialSlJBSpiingSvMngcoiiccil.which 
gels underway at S:(X) pm m Belk Audito- 
rium. Admission to Spring Swing is free 
wiih a PC II) and SS.OO lor ilie general 
puhiii 



Murder mystery proves to be a 'Bone Chiller!' 



by Angela Richjii''l.';t)n 

ENIERTAINMLNT EDITOR 

Murder, mystery and puzzles will 
confu.se and delight students as the Presby- 
terian College Players present "Bone 
Chiller!" March 22-28 in the Douglas 
Hou.se Sludio Theater. 

Thirteen people gather m the Travers 
Mansion for the reading of the late Josiah 
Travers' will. Written in the form of a 
puzzle, the will leaves the fortune to any 



one who can decipher it. Each character 
races against ihe others lo sol ve ilie pu/zle to 
claim the fortune and find Josiah's mur- 
derer. Time after time, the murderer suikes 
causing confusion to envelope the Travers 
Mansi(m as ihe characters become suspi- 
ciousof family and friends and fear lor their 
lives. 

The cast docs an excellent job perform- 
ing the "Cluc"-like murder mystery, "This 
priHluction is a result of the hard work of 
about 30 students, and I think the audience 



will be pleasantly surjiriscd and entertained," 
said Dr. Dale Rams, professor ol s|)eechand 
driuiia who IS directing the show. Hard work 
and long hours make this priKlucUon a sure 
success. 

riie play begins a 7:.M) nightly with 
susjK'nce and murder. I'or reservations, call 
8.VV8.3I7 between 2 and "i (nii wi-okdavs 

Cast List 

Jerry Delvin: Benjamin Medley 

Connie Travers: Kalliy Kennedy 



Buzzy Burden: Shamba Warwick 

The(Hk)sia Travers: Betsy Walgrcn 

Flame Fondue: Kim Fry 

Ziia Van Zok: Conchita Woodmll 

Mauvins: Artie lumei 

Addie Sheridan: Angela Mills 

Eloise Ainsiey: Karen Wiiienbr(H)k 

Pippi: Braiuli Kogerson 

Lucreiia: Beth llarrelsim 

Dan lX>nton Chnslopher Nichols 

Stage Manager: Rebecca Heniz 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVl Number 1 1 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way. " 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. South Caiolma 29325 



Thursday. MaFeh 16. 1992 



PC Student awanded 
sociology fellowship 

Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Chris Wcldon is a student who is un- 
afraid to Uikc the initiative. Not only is 
Wcldon a member of the Presbyterian Col- 
lege Student Government Association, mi- 
nority student union, student Icllowship 
choir, and f(X)tball and track teams, but he is 
always willing to tackle a new challenge. 
For example, when Weldon recently saw a 
notice on a bulletin board about Minority 
Opportunity Summer Training F-ellowships 
offered by the American Stxiological Asso- 
ciation Association, he inquired aN)ul the 
opportunity, filled out the application and 
wrote two required essays. 

Now. Wcldon's initiative has been re- 
warded. 

The junior sociology major from 
LaCrange, Georgia, is the first student from 




Chris Weldon 



file photo 



Presbyterian College ti) be awarded thai 
fellowship, which will allow him to study 
for SIX weeks this summer at the University 
of Michigan. 

The fellowship includes r(X)m, boiird, 
and travel will allow Weldon to gain an 
intensive introduction to graduate study m 
s(Kiology. While it entails participating ma 
reseaah project at the University of Michi 
giin. the felk)wship will also carry over to 
Weldon's senior year at Presbyterian Col 
lege. Up*)n returning to college, he will 
select a faculty member m the PC stxiology 
department with whom he will work on a 
more [X'rsonal research project 

"Chris has done an outstanding job as a 
leader on this cam^ms with his efforts to 
inert, se awareness of pertinent issues," said 
Chon Glover. c(x)r(lmalor of student volun 
teer servicesand mnu>rity af lairs, w ho hel[X'd 
Weldon with the application prtxcss. "This 
fellowship IS most deserved and will help 
him carry out important rcseareh." 

Weldon is the son ol H/ekiel and Diane 
Weldon ol l.aGrange. 




Spring comes to PC 



Third Political Parties: A PC Perspective of the Political Periphery 



bv Michael P. Darling, Jr. 

GUEST WRITER 

Dr. David Gillespie, a 
founder and integral member 
of ific Presbyterian College 
Political Science Department, 
will st)on join the ranks of pub 
lishing pn)fcssors who have 
paxluced books that have cap- 
tivated university classmoms 
and interested readers alike. Dr. 
CJillespie's new book, Poliiics 
ai the Periphery Ihird Pariies 
in a I wo Party Ameruu, is to be 
published by the University of 
South Carol ina Pre'ss before the 
end of this year. 

When asked why he vsa^ 
attracted to the topic of third 
parties, Gillespie said, "It was 
lor the same reason that I wanted 
U) become a political scientist 
a keen interest in all political 
Nulies who share in a vision". 
Gillespie implies that It was his 
fascination with those gn)ups 
who have a concrete agenda 
some noble, some silly, and 
some cxta*mely dangerous - 
which interested him in begin- 
ning his a'search. Healscmotcs 
that Ik- is not attempting to point 
out and dwell on extremism, 
rather, those parties which carry 
an altemative agenda to the centrist fx>- 
siiu)ns ol the IXMiiocratic and Republi- 
can parties. He further suggests that this 




Dr. (iillespie 



IS what makes America different from 
other dcmcvracics. 

While conducting his research. 



which began in earnest in the 
mid- 1970's. Dr. Gillespie 
has encountered some rather 
unique politically active in- 
dividuals. He told of an en- 
counter at a cafe in Br(x>k- 
lyn. New York with the leader 
of the American Maoist 
party. Dunng their conver- 
sation, his Maoist host turned 
up the volume of a nearby 
radio so that their dialogue 
would not. according to tiK 
Maoist, "be overheard by 
Federal Agents". In contrast 
10 his experience with an 
avowed Communist. 
Gillespie also parlays a story 
of meeting the leader of the 
American Na/i Party at tiic 
then National Headquarters 
for tlic Na/i's which was in 
Arlington. Virginia. If read- 
ers find these tidbits allur- 
ing, many more transcribed 
interviews and experiences 
will appear in Gillespie's 
published work. 

The publication date has 
yet to be established so that 
an accurate Third party ap- 
pendix fn>m the upcoming 
November elections may be 
added, however, the PC 
community can soon exp^l 
David Gillespie's interesting and in- 
sightful text to appear in campus and 
specialty btxjkstorcs across the nation 



J Ue photo 



EDITORIAL 



11 RSDAY, APRIL 16, 1992 



Setting a goal and achieving it requires courage 



by Jason West 

MANAGING EDITOR 

About six years ago, my 
family began the process 
of "putting" my dad 
through college. Let me 
tell you, It was an experi- 
ence of both anguish and 

joy- 
Way back in 1964, my 

father graduated from a 
small, rural high school in 
South Carolina. Unfortu- 
nately, he did not enroll in 
college due to the fact that 
the Vietnam War was go- 
ing strong at the time. In- 
stead, he enrolled in the 
navy and after serving his 
country faithfully, he came 
home to marry my mom. 

Dad got a job with E. I. 
Dupont de Nemours Com- 
pany, and he and Mom be- 
gan to build a family. 

Well, in 1986, my father 
began to long for some- 
thing he had never ob- 
tained, and that something 
was a college degree. With 
the help of his employer, 
he enrolled In Limestone 
College and began the 
journey down the long road 
to higher education. 

For a four year period, 



Dad would travel to Co- 
lumbia, South Carolina, 
every Monday, Tuesday, 
and Wednesday to take his 
college classes. (Lime- 
stone is actually located 
in Gaffney, South Carolina, 
but it has a satalllte col- 



mother had to always deal 
with my younger brother 
Adam. You see, by nature, 
Adam was a walking disci- 
pline problem. 

Of course. Dad's not 
being around a lot did 
cause a great deal of fam- 



Courage is something that 
nearly everyone strives 
for but only a Tew 
actually achieve. 





lege in Columbia.) 

During his college 
years, Dad had to concen- 
trate a great deal of his 
time on his studying. 
Hence, Mom was forced to 
play the role of "wife," 
"mother," and "father." 
She even had to become 
the family disciplinarian. 
That was a job in which my 



ily arguments and prob- 
lems. However, he some- 
how managed to be at 
home and listen when he 
was needed most. 

Since he had not had a 
formal education for over 
twenty years, college was 
a culture shock for Dad 
Because he was so unfa- 
miliar with English, math, 



and history, I often found 
myself helping Dad with his 
work. We spent many 
hours together research- 
ing term papers and an- 
swering discussion ques- 
tions and problems about 
literature, government, 
and any other subject you 
can think of. 

In 1990, Dad finally fin- 
ished. He graduated from 
college at the same time I 
graduated from high 
school. I am very proud of 
my dad because he has 
proven to me that an edu- 
cation is something worth 
working for. It takes a lot 
of courage for a forty- 
year-old man to start 
school all over again. 

Courage is something 
that nearly everyone 
strives for but only a few 
actually achieve. I view 
my dad as a man of cour- 
age and someone I can take 
great pride in. He beat the 
odds and successfully ob- 
tained his goal of a col- 
lege education. 

Dad, I have always ad- 
mired you, and I am proud 
to say that you are my fa- 
ther! 



I he Blue Stocking ol Prcsbylerian College 
CI nlon, Soulti Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVI, Number 1 1 
April 1ft. 1992 

Editor in chiet l>nnie Lynn Hill 

Managing Eduor Jason West 

News Editor Paul Alkmson 

Politics EdiU)r Ted Camiichael 

Sports Editor Brad Busbee 

Entertainment Editor Angie Ruhardson 

Features Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

Environment Editor Heallier Moncrief 
Photography /Darkroom Brian Koehler 

Layout Editor Carolyn Nichols 

Copy Editor Mike Weaver 

Advertising EdiU)r Ann Maylicld 

Subscriptions/Exchange Ron Mixon 

Artist Edward Clark 



PhcMof^raphy Staff 

JohnTritt Margaret Davis Jason W infield 
Tracy Kutasaka Kimbtrlee Gibson BillBoan 
Laura Meyers Brad Sims Patrick John Plian 
UeMcAlK-e Meliss«Jackst)n LisaWcaver 
U>e Maynard Adrienne ivey 



Staff Writers 

Eli/abcth Spann Am.inda Bowers 

Karen WiitenhriHik frank McKay 

Ed Kirkland Kaltn-rine Bonnei 

Everett Catls Adrienne Ivey Nancy Niieion 

Cher Eulbright Mickelle Cantey 

Lee Maynard Tientnn Arnold 

Sh.ua Ciiirwuod li-i^'h H.Minhiirg 



The Hlue Slocking is a biweekly student 
publicalum ot Presbyterian College The paper 
serves as a toruni of news and opinion of regional 
and national concern lor advertising, contact 
The Hlue Slocking, Presbyterian College, Box 
1061, Clinton, SC I'iM^. The Hlue Slocking 
welcomes letters to the editor from all members 
of the PC community Signatures are required 
Letters are printed on a space available has The 
Hlue Slocking reserves the right to edit all letters 
for projH'r grammar and punctuation The final 
deadline for submitting letters is Iriday at 
12 (K>i)m on the week belore publKalmn 




THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1992 



FEATURES 



PC Social Science Students Win Academic Awards 



by Dr. Stephen Bu};gie 
GUEST WRITER 

On Friday, April 3rd, eight research 
papers wntten by Presbyterian College stu- 
dents were given at the Fifteenth annual 
Carolina Undergraduate Social Science 
Synnposium, whtch was held at Lander Col- 
lege in Greenwood. In the academic confer- 
ence tradition, the presentations were brief 
fifteen minute lectures by the authors. The 
researchers read their reports and in some 
instances supplemented them with paper 
handouts or overhead transparencies. Fol- 
lowing each lecture the authors were ques- 
tioned about their research. Two sessions 
ran concurrently in adjacent classrooms so 
that those who attended could chcxjse to 
attend sessions on topics of personal inter- 
est. Thirty to forty persons typically were 
present at each session. 

The twenty-three papers spanned a 
broad range of topics and methodologies in 
sociology, psychology, and anthropology. 
Slu(tent authors and faculty advisors at- 
tended from SIX campuses: Augusta Col- 
lege, Francis Marion, Lander College. USC 
at Aiken, Western Carolina University, and 
Presbyterian College. 

The PC student presenters and their 
report topics were as follows: Ten Barefield 
on education and capital punishment; Ed- 
ward Clarke on deurrcnce inprisons; Stacey 
Creier and CTirisu Wynn on visual percep- 
tion in volleyball; Danny Eagen and Betsy 
Glenn on euthanasia altitude persuasion; 
Paige Wilson and Kim Lemon on eye con- 
tact in dating couples; Kim Tucker on atti- 
tudes towards female athletes; Kimbcrly 
Nations on the relationship of personal traits 
to subjects' attitudes towards soviet com- 
munism; and Cathy Sawyer on the distinc- 
tiveness of Southcm culture. Dr. Robert 
Freymeyer and Dr. Stephen Buggie accom- 
panied the PC students to Lander for the 
symposium. 

The lecture sessions were completed by 
nix)n, followed by a special luncheon at the 
fiKulty dining room on the Lander campus. 
The keynote speaker at the conference was 
Dr. Eimcsl Furchtogott. Chair of the FNy- 
chology department at USC-Coluinbia. Dr. 
Furchtgott's lecture wasentitled, "Why Am 
I Majoring in the Sixial Sciences?" The 
theme of his talk was that a liberal arts 
education based on the siKial sciences is 
particularly appropriate in the present era of 
rapid technological change 

Sfvcial recognition was given at the 
sym|X)sium's conclusion to the authors ol 
the three best pafx-rs. During the morning 



lectures, faculty advisors from the six par- 
ticipating campuses rated each presenter on 
four criteria: clanty, originality of the topic, 
methodology, and presentational style. The 
ratings were compiled and cwnpared, and 
the highest ranked researchers were identi- 
fied. The presenters with the three best 
composite rating scores won certificates and 
ca.sh pri/.esof S50,S3(),or$20. Presbyterian 
College students won two of the awards, a 
disproporuonately high share. Teri Barefield 
won the third place prize for research on 
capital punishment, and Cadiy Sawyer won 
the second place prize for her analysis of 
Southern regional culture. The top ranked 
prize was won by a student from Western 
Carolina University, whose paper analyzed 
a student internship site with the methods of 
cultural anthropology. 

By 2:30 pm, the symposium ended and 
participants retumed to their home cam- 
puses. Why are such conferences held and 
what are their benefits? For many decades 
academic conference had been the haven of 
researchers, teaching faculty, and graduate 
students. Involvement of college under- 
graduates is a recent phenomenon. Since 
the 1970's, large regional conferences have 
welcomed undergraduates' participation, 
sometimes offering special sections for un- 
dergraduate presenters. The annual social 
science symposium at Lander college eaten 
to undergraduate exclusively so that stu- 
dents are among their peers frwn neighbor- 
ing campuses m the local region. The ben- 
efits of making a conference presentation 
are substantial, for the presenters themselves 
and also for their major departments. The 
opportunity to make a formal preseniauon 
encourages students to develop their work at 
a higher level than would ordinarily be done 
for a class project. At the end of each 
semester, the typical term paper or project 
often is abandoned in a file drawer. But the 
papers read at the symposium were not 
buried; they were substantially revised by 
their authors in preparation for the confer- 
ence. Ihc student symposium enable stu- 
dents to speak formally belore an unfamiliar 
but sophisucated audience, a useful skill for 
many professions. For students and faculty 
alike, the chance to hear about studies done 
by others elsewhere in the same field gener- 
ates many fresh ideas as well as providing a 
stanchu^d by which one's own efforts can be 
judged, furthermore, the experience of 
having p;irticipaied in an academic confer- 
ence IS a special achievement that may give 
the student presenter a compeiiUve edi!i 
over other candidates m gaming admission 
to graduate sch(K)l. 




phoio by Stephen Buf|ie 
PC Student presenters (left to right): Kim Lemon, Kim Tucker, Paige Wilson, 
Kimberly Nations, Cathy Sawyer, Betsy Glenn, Edward Clarke, Stacey Creter, 
Danny Eagen, and Teri Barefield. 



PC student pre- 
senters who won 
prizes for best pa* 
pers at the Carolina 
IJ.G. Social SciciMc 
sympsoiuni,April3, 
1992: Cathy Saw. 
yer (left) and Teri 
Barefield (right) 




photo by Stephen Buggic 



EAT IN - CARRY OUT - DELIVERY 

199PIZZA S P EC I A I ' 




Any One 



I Medium Specialty Piz/a 



With Purchase Of Another Me<iium 
Speciahy Pizza at Regular Price. 

Not good with any other coupon offer or PC. discount. 

One coupon per pany per visit at the Clmton Pizza Hut only 

Must present coupon with purchase. 



.Pcppcroni Lovers 
.SuprcHU' 




PEPSI 



FEATURES 



TlllKSIMY, APRIL 16, 1992 



THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1992 



ENVIRONMENT 



Rhonda Peck dedicates college career to serving others 



PC Alumna discusses water quality in South Carolina 



by Le Jeanna Maddox 

F'EATURES EDITOR 

You may not icnow exactly who she is, 
but there's no doubt you've heard her. Her 
sneeze across GDH is a better jolt than a cup 
of coffee to wake you up in the morning, and 
her smile and vociferousenthusiasmprccced 
her, wherever she goes. Channeling that 
enthusiasm into volunteer services, Rhonda 
Peck has left an indelible mark on PC, a 
mark that she hopes will be contagious after 
she graduates. 

Rhonda's commitment to service be- 
gan long before college. After winning the 
Atlanta Community Service Award in high 
school, Rhonda was looking for a college 
witli a strong volunteer program. "1 decided 
to come to Presbyterian College because of 
Student Volunteer Services. 1 was involved 
with alol of service work in high sch(x)l , and 
1 wanted to continue my involvement with 
that," .says Peck. One of her first service 
endeavors involved the establishmenr of a 
Habitat for Humanity chapter on campus. 




S h e 
worked 
closely 
with 
alum- 
nus 
Mary 
Ellen 
Vernon 
to create 
a PC as 
well as a 
Laurens 
County 
chapter, 
and she 
later 
served 
as Presi- 
dent of 
t h c 
campus group. 

The most challenging but rewarding 
aspect of Rhonda's four years at PC has 
been her role this year as the student micm 



Rhonda with a Thornwell sister, photo courtesy ofChon Glover 



coordi- 
nator 
for.Siu- 
d e n t 
Vohin- 
leer 
S e r 
vices. 
S h 

i^ \ r r - 

.sees the 
c(X)rdi- 
nation 
of each 
of the 
twenty- 
eight 
organi- 
zations 
u n d r 
SVS. "I make sure thai each program has 
enough volunteers and thai the c(H>rdiiiat()rs 
have everything m order,' she explains. 
She makes it all sound simple, but lew 
jvople reali/e the frustrations and hours ot 



work that figure into the success of such a 
tremendous project. She adds that the inspi- 
ration lor her desire to serve comes from her 
grandmother. "I wouldn't be where 1 am 
w iihout her sup[H)rt. She has always taught 
me to have a |K)sitive aliiiude, to be enthusi- 
astic, and lo be non-judgemental." 

An l-lomeniary Education major, 
Khonda has alre^idy secured a job next year 
leaching kindergarten at Pace Academy in 
Ailani;!. "it's always been a goal of mine to 
reium there, IxHause that's my alma-maier," 
she explains. 

Rhonda's one piece of advice to PC 
siudenLs is, "Get involved with everything 
you can. Don't sit in your rinmi. Find your 
niche, and give it your all! " She firmly 
believes in the schcx)rs motto, DumVivimus 
Servimus, and stresses that if PC students 
lake advantage of tlieir op[xiriuniiies, they 
can icarn as much by giving diemselves to 
olhers as ihey can in the classroom. By 
serving, she says, "You learn about others, 
and even int)re alx)iii yourself." 



'Music to Build By' 

PC's Habitat for Humanity chapter gears up lor first annual Bandblast 



by Le Jeanna Maddox 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Question: What's the best way lo spend 
your last weekend on campus before ex- 
ams? 

Question: When's the last lime you heard 
seven different bands for a meager five 
dollars? 

If you've been anywhere on campus for 
the past few weeks, you must have seen or 
heard that the obvious answer lo Ihese per- 
plexing inquiries is Habitat for Humanity's 



BANDBLAST! On Saturday. April 25, 
seven bands will perform an all-day mara- 
thon concert on the Pondo to raise money for 
the Laurens County chapter of Habitat for 
Humanity. The Neighbors from Athens, 
GA; Simon Sez from Greenwood; The 
Cro.sstie Walkers of Thomson, GA; 
Clinton's Ruff Boy/; and K"s very own 
Naked Betsy and Kli/abeth and Landim 
have all generously agreed lo donate their 
lime and talents to the benefit concert. 

When PC's chapter of Habitat was 
chartered during the 1989-90 .school year, 
the student founders had a vision of creating 
a Laurens County affiliate chapter. Thanks 



10 the efforts of some dedicated PC students 
like Mary Ellen Vernon, the county chapter 
was begun. The average cost of building 
materials for a house is close to $2.S,(KX), 
however, .so the county has dedicated its 
first two years to fundraising efforts. With 
the monetary goal nearly realized, Habitat 
hopes to raise enough money through 
BANDBLAST U) enable the county chapter 
to purchase a plot of land and to begin 
consu-uction this summer. 

BANDBLAST coordinators Kimberly 
Nations, Jennifer Gordon, and Mark Hunt 
have sacnficcd immeasuable energy and 
ume lo insure the success of this first annual 



event. Tin really excited abtnjl the poten- 
tial ol this fundraiser - not only helping lo 
sum the first house in Laurens C(xjnty but 
also increasing the awareness of Habitat's 
mission," says Gordon. "I'm thankful for 
the supp[X)rt of the K" md Clinton commu- 
nities, and hofx; thai everyone will come out 
and enjoy a fabulous day!" 

You are invited lo bring a picnic and a 
blanket, a tnsby or a IcxHball, your parents 
or a dale. There will be fcxxl. drinks, and 
dtx)rj)n/es. The aciiviues begin at 1 1 :{X)AM 
and will go on continually unlil 7:(X)PM. 
Tickets are $5 in advance and SH at the gate 
and may be purchased m the dining hall. 



Clinton's own - Ruff Boyz 



Dave Lamotte - Montreal, NC 



PCs - Naked Betsy 



The Neighbors - Athens, Georgia 



Join us with 
"Music to Build By" 

at 
BANDBLAST 



I"(Kxi and recreation 



Simon Sez - Green wtxxl 



PC's Hli/abeth and Landon 



April 25, 1992 
11AM till 7PM 



he Crosstie Walkers Thomson, Georgia 



Tickets $5 in advance and $8 at the gate. 
All prweeds ro tn the Laurens Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. 



by Jane D. Settle. 1977 PC Graduate 
GUEST WRITER 




Water quality is a large aspect of envi- 
ronmental protection. The South Carolina 
Water Pollution Conu^ol Act and the Federal 
Clean Water Act i\ic the two primary pieces 
of legislauon which regulate water pollu 
lion activities in this stale. TheS.C. Depart- 
ment of Health and Environmental Control 
(DHEC) is the slate agency mandated by the 
United States Environmental Agency to en- 
force these laws. 

Many activities ass{x:iated with growth 
and development have the potential for de- 
gratlmg water quality in our coastal waters. 
Pollutants enter Ixxlies of water from both 
point sources which emanate from the end 
of a pipe or a single point and nonpoini 
sources which runoff from sources such as 
paved highways, bridges, parking lots, and 
agricultural 
fields. The 
effects of 
these pollut- 
ants on our 
coastal re- 
sources can 
range from 
mortality, 
from a cata- 
s I r o p h i c 
event such as 
an oil spill to 
chronic ef- 
fects such as 
reduced 
growth rales 
or reduced 
reprcxlucUve 
succes.scs. 

There 
are several 

types of point source discharges all of which 
;ire regulated and require National Pollutant 
Discharge Elimination System, or NPDES, 
permits from DHEC. Limits on the levelsof 
pollutants allowed in these discharges arc 
made a part of ihc permit, but Ihey are often 
eiihcr not sufficient or are not su-iclly en- 
forced. Municipal wastewater and pakage 
u-eatment plant dischargescan be a st)urcc ot 
inputs ot high levels of bacteria, which can 
result in additional closures of productive 
shellfish gmunds,orhigh levelsof chlorine, 
which is highly toxic lo many organisms 
Pollutants found in industrial wastewater 
discharges can include coniaminates like 
heavy mcUtls and a number of organic 
chemicals, the effects of which are oficn 
subde, long-term, and difliculi lo pinpoint. 
There aa' alst) several EPA Suivrfund sites 
in ihe Low Counuy which arc sources of 
pi)lluiants before and during c leanup activi 
ties High levels of creosote and otfier 
contaminants in sedimeni at a site on the 
Ashley River were delected only when 
dredging for an adjacent facility released 
pt>llutants, resulting in a fish kill. 

NonjX)int st)ua e {X>lluUon is much nu)re 
difficult situation to address. bt)th because it 
IS noi yet heavily rcgulaU'd in South Caro- 
lina and because it originates from diverse 




activities and over broad geographic areas. 
These arc the primary categones into which 
NPS IS grouped. There are numerous com- 
ponents each of which may be present in 
many of the different categories of nonpoint 
source pollution. Runoff of pesticides from 
farm fields is one of the oldest known 
nonpoini sources and a cause of catasuophic 
results in the form of fi.sh kills. Surpnsingly 
high Icvclsofbacienacan be inu-oduced into 
waterlxxlies from livesKKk operations, even 
on a small .scale. 

The grow th anddevelopment previously 
mentioned is resulting in inputs from several 
other categones of NPS pollution. Con- 
su-uction activities, both of buildings and 
highways for access, can result in greatly 
increased loadings of sedimeni and other 
substances into coastal waters unless proper 
Best Management Practices are ulili/.ed. 
Impacts on fish and other wildlife can range 

from 
smother- 
ing to 
clogging 
of gills to 
mortality 
of eggs 
and lar- 
vae at 
certain 
limes of 
the year. 
Impervi- 
ous sur- 
faces, 
such as 
high- 
ways, 
bridges, 
and park- 
Ci ing lots, 
file photo accumu- 
late a vanely of pollutanis which are washed 
into adjacent waierbodies with every ram 
event. Older coastal cities like Charleston 
have major n(XHling problems and conmb- 
ulc significanUy to water quality degrada- 
tion from runoff after rains. The amount of 
polluuon which can be intrmiuced is more 
evident when one thinks about this in terms 
of water volumes. A one-inch rainfall de- 
posits 27. (XK) gallons of water on one acre of 
land. Muluply this by the hundreds of acres 
in a city the si/c of Charleston and these 
numbers quickly become millions of gal- 
lons. Tlw primary facU)r which determines 
whether this water Nxomcs runoff into adja- 
cent nvcrsand marshes or percolates into the 
soil IS whether the surface on which it falls is 
impervious or not This type of runoff from 
impervKXis surfaces surrounding waterfront 
industry can carry many different types of 
pollutants with the potential to impact coastal 
resources. Also, consuucuon of hoasing 
immediately adjacent lo coastal waters in- 
creases the rale of ninoff and the level of 
contaminants present in the area One type 
of land u.se which is rapidly increasing, ihe 
development of golf courses, may be con- 
uibuung unknown levelsofa wide variety of 
pesticides tocoastal waters, Mosquito abate- 
ment and other vector control acu vines, both 



^rial and ground dispersicwi, represent other 
nonpoint sources which result from human 
habitation which has the potential to input 
pesticides into coastal waters. 

One of the primary reasons that people 
move to coastal areas is to obtain access to 
the water. The number of registered boats 
in the eight coastal counties of South Caro- 
lina IS increasing rapidly, having irK:reased 
by .several thousand in the last fifteen years. 
The number of marinas has also risen. Ma- 
rinas, if well -operated, may not result in the 
intrcxluction of pollutants, but possible 
sources are present. Discharges from 
"he ad.s" of larger boats, spills of gasoline or 
oil, excess detergents from cleaning boats, 
runoff of contaminants from "on-the-hill" 
boat maintenance activities, and leachate 
fre)m toxic bottom coatings are all possibili- 
ties. 

Probably one of the worst forms of 
nonpoint source pollution (Kcurs in our 
own yards. When individuals put pesticides 
on flowers or Ilea spray or dip on pels, 
where do they rinse the used containers? If 
it is near a su-eam, marsh or city sewer, this 
isconuibutmg to nonpoint pollution. Also, 
if pesticides are sprayed or fertilizer is ap- 
plied soon before a ram the excess ends up 
in the nearest water body. These are things 
that everyone can work on to decrease 
nonpoint source pollution. 

The primary funcuon of the Environ- 
mental Evaluauons Program is to investi- 
gate, monitor and report on the.se changes 
and alterations from both natural processes 
aitd man's activity within the coastal and 
marine environment. Permit applications 
lo federal and stale agencies which involve 
physical and chemical alterations to wet- 
land habitats ate reviewed by EEP biolo- 
gists. Theseagenciesincludeihe U.S. Army 
Corp of Engineers, the U.S. Coast Guard, 
the S.C. Coastal Council, the S.C. Depart- 
ment of Health and Environmental Control, 
and the S.C. Water Resources Commission. 
Comments from the.sc reviews arc submit- 
ted to the Environmental Affairs Coordina- 
te in Columbia, S.C. through the Director 
of Office of Fisheries Management for in- 
c lusion into a single deparunent posiuon for 
each application. 

Other acuvities include the preparauon 
of resource inveniones and assessments, 
the review of fecteral and slate envu-onmen- 
ialimpact.siaiements,ccrtifications,asscss- 
ments and reports rcquyed of nw)rc com- 
plex proposed alierauons, investigations of 
spills and discharges of toxic maienals and 
contaminants, fish kills and other impacts 
related to maintenance of high water qual- 
ity, assistance in field sampling efforts for 
ongoing studies of the Envimnmental Stud- 
ies Section of MRRl. and participation on 
numerouscommittecsand task forces related 
lo environmental impacts and comprehen- 
sive planning efforts. 

During Fiscal Year 1 99() 1 99 1 . ihe EEP 
reviewed and commented on a total of 1 .4 1 7 
state and fetkral permits and cerlifKations 
for various consirucuon acuvities and alter- 
aiicMis m coastal wetlands and waters of the 
state. Over a third of the permit responses 



submitted consisted of formal objections for 
protects which were felt to have potential 
adverse impacts on marine and esiuanne 
resources. In an effort to minimize environ- 
mental impacts, special conditions were re- 
quested lo be placed on over a half of the 
processed applications. The number of per- 
mit requests is steady increasing, resulting 
in continued pressure on the coastal re- 
sources. 

The 500,000 acres of estuanne wet- 
lands in South Carolina have recognized 
value to coastal fisheries as well as to many 
other aspects of the economy including tour- 
ism and recreation. However, growth and 
development are occuring in South 
Carolina's coastal zone at an a-sonishing 
rate. The projection of a population of 
TOO.fXX) by the year 2000 in the ui-county 
area is bewildering, for if it is not properly 
managed the rapid development could bnng 
with it a number of new problems which can 
result in a larger vanety of negative impacts 
on the coastal resources and the habitats 
upon which they are dependent. 




> Drinking an«i dkvfs 
cImnI y*vr mind immI 
c«wM ri«iiy cli«ic*t. 

> Uns«f« MX CIM l««Ni •• 
AIDS. 

> 0«t ImIp for ■ drvg nr 
drinliinf proi»lMn. 

> N yo« hmw mx, wm • 
condn n i. Or «v*id t^- 
inf Hm risk n i l« f Hi nr. 




POLITICS 



THURSDAY, APRIL Ih. 1992 



Public education in America: Problems and suggested solutions 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

When taken in context of history, the 
American educational system is an incred- 
ibleachievement. The illiteracy rate is lower 
than it has ever been, our way of thinking in 
general is on what we would like to think of 
as a higher plain, and equal education for all 
isconsidered not only aprivilege.butaGod- 
given right. Yet before we strain our arms 
patting ourselves on the back, we should 
consider what could be done that we do not 
do. What are the shortcomings of our sys- 
tem? 

We should view the American system 
inlhecontcxtoflhcagewelivein: how docs 
it compares to our status, as well as the 
systems of other countries? It is under this 
scrutiny that we can sec the failures. There 
is a growing disparity between poor schools 
and rich ones. Also, we are not allocating 
enough of our resources as a whole to publ ic 
education. And finally, we do not teach our 
children well enough; they don't learn the 
right things and, in general, have an antago- 
nistic view towards education. 

In many cases, only six percent of a 
school's operating budget comes from the 
federal government, and 47 percent comes 
from the state. That leaves the remaining 47 
percent up to local {M-operty taxes, which 
causes the inequality. Wealthier school 
districts, by definition, have more funds to 
allocate to students. Even in districts that 
are in close proximity, there can be a vast 
difference m the amount of money spent per 
student. For example, the Glen Rose district 
in an affluent area of Texas spends over 
$9,300 per pupil, which is three limes that 
spent in schools in the Rio Grande Valley. 
Books and supplies are sparse in some inner 
city schools in Chicago, while in Winnetka, 
a suburb north of the city, there is a public 
school that has seven gyms, rooms for wres- 
tling, fencmg, and dance mstruction, and an 
Olympic-style swimming pool. 

Some places arc fighting these 
inconsistanccs through the courts. The fi- 
nance sy.stcm in Kentucky was ruled uncon- 
stitutional by their supreme court in 1989. 
Whereas before the wealthier school dis- 
UicLs got $4,2(X) a year per student, com- 



pared with only $ 1 ,700 in the poorest areas, 
now every school receives at least $3,200 
for each pupil. 

In New Jersey and Texas the systems 
have been found unconstitutional, but what 
system to replace it with is still the cau.se of 
much debate. Also, people in many states 
are bitterly opposing any changes in the 



year than France, Germany, Japan, and the 
United Kingdom. And as a percentage of 
gross national product, the United Slates is 
about average, yet we still rank near the 
lowest among indusu^ialized nations whcnit 
comes to standard international tests. This 
seems to indicate that it is not how much 
money we spend, but where we spend it. 




system. Jonathan Kozol, whose book Sav- 
age Inequalities exposes many of these 
problems, makes the point that wealthier 
Americans "cto not want poor children to be 
harmed, they simply want the best for their 
children. 

Certainly, the gross disparancies need to 
be corrected, but to give every district the 
exact same amount would be unfair as well. 
This is not, after all, a socialist stale; some 
protection of the status quo in school sys- 
tems is expected, as in the rest of American 
society. What is more impwiant is an in- 
creased commiUTient to education overall. 
We need to raise the bottom line standards 
that have been slowly drifting towards the 
gutter. 

In inflation adjusted dollars, spending 
per student has increased 33 percent in ihe 
past ten years. President Bush concluded 
from this that we should "slop U'ying to 
measure progress in terms of money spent. 
It's lime we held our.sch(X)ls-andoursclves- 
accouniablc for results." Bu.sh makes a 
go(xl point. We spend more per siudont, per 



Some experts point out that America gener- 
ally spends more on adminisu-ation and 
buildings than on teacher's salaries (for ex- 
ample, in Germany teachers are well in the 
middle class, and enjoy fringe benefits, such 
as low-interest mortgages and no social- 
security taxes). 

Nevertheless, we are not spending as 
much as we should. Not only should teach- 
ers salaries be increased, but the number of 
teachers should be greater as well. Jana 
Czerwonky, a student teacher here at PC 
thinks that 20 students per classroom should 
be the maximum. 

"My SIX graders range in ability from 
second or third grade to about eighth, but I 
just can't give them the individual ailenuoii 
they need," says Czerwonky. Not only do 
teachers often have to work with over thirty 
students, they have to work with very lini 
lied resources, and are usually asked lo 
perform other tasks as well, from being 
organizational leaders to pertorming hall 
monitor duty. 

Not only do we need to commit more of 



our resources to the next generation, we 
need to switch the roles of the slate and 
national governments. With a national, uni- 
form system we could insiigaie long term 
plans and goals. 

National curriculums and standards need 
to be esiabli.shcd, so ihai ilie counu-y has 
some idea of where its going with education. 
Complains University of Illinois professor 
Hcrberi Walberg, "We have so much au- 
tonomy, everyone docs their own thing, to 
the point where a fifth-graiie leather can't 
couniona fourth-grade teacher having taught 
certain things." Also, with the federal gov- 
ernment in charge, the IcKal taxes can be 
dropped in favor of national ones, .so that, as 
Kozol argues in his b(H)k, the money can 
then be fairly distributed among the dis- 
tricts. Then if certain sch{K)ls wanted to 
raise exu^a money for special projects, they 
could do .so through the local PTA. 

Not only do we need to revamp what our 
kids learn, wc need to change how they 
learn. There isa stigma to doing school work 
that IS prevalent m the system, and teachers 
are more likely to be .seen as the enemy than 
a mentor. Hanging out and being c(X)l is 
more important than going to class, and 
"only geeks bother to do their homework." 
Chester Finn makes the point that teachers 
are not held "accountable" tor theu^ perfor- 
mance, and argues against tenure, says, 'Try 
to imagine a law giving. d(K tors 'operat- 
ing-r(X)m tenure." And Education Secre- 
tary Lamar Alexander notes that leaching 
"is the only profession in which you are not 
paid one extra cent for being gixxl at your 
job." 

In a historical sense, the strides we have 
made in education are to be commended, 
and probably will be centuries from now. 
There are still many problems thai need to 
be addressed, and this papi-r has only touched 
upon a lew ol them. We need, in general, to 
continually su-ive for improvemenl.if not to 
stay competitive in the world marketplace, 
then merely because educauon is a noble 
pursuit. It creates stability, understanding 
among dillereni p^-oples, and advances so- 
ciety as a whole. Whal do we live for if not 
to pass on ihe knowledge we ix)sses .' 




NOBODY 
KNOWS 
LIKE 
DOMINO'S. 

Hcfw You Like Pizza At Home. 



P.C. Student Discounts 
Medium one topping pizza $5.99 
Large one topping pizza $7.99 
Good anytime-no coupon needed-to campus 



2 Regular 

12" Cheese 

Pizzas for 

$8.88! 




Just call and order your 
favorite TWO regular 
12" cheese pi/zas. 



Valid •( |ia'itLip«ring tt(M»« only Nm vaitd *<ih »ny trihtf ofl«f H(ict^« may «af, 
CuMomaf pays applicattia %«la% irf* I imilad dltl'vfry araa Our ili vtt'b r arry lt*H 
Ihan J«)no I1119S9 Oominoj Pi//» inc 



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Lunch 
Special! 



A12"1-ToppingPizza 

ONLY 



s 



Open for Lunch 
eveyday. 

11:30-4:00 



$5.00 



Vai4j m p«iit(,ip4|t/>g MufKt only HrA valid *'th jny ulh^t Dtt«t P'<( 9% rr^ay tf*' v 
C(iSilom#( pays ipp)i(,*tt't Ml«s !•■ hmit»d fitiivery a'ta Ou' ()'■>«*• t if y ^ts^ 
thai, y^m %^m9 Owm^-n ' ' .,1 . 



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HURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1992 



SPORTS 



PC Adds Whitt to Athletic Department 



by Brad Busbee 

S[>()RT.S EDITOR 



PC wa.s lucky lo be able lo nab Rick 

VVhiit from North Carolina Siaie Univeisily 
curly this semester. Whiii is the new fooi- 
hall ilelensivc back coach and the hca(Hr;K;k 
coach lor K'. 

"I like K' a lot. The people here make 
all the dilTerence in the world. I've felt 
welcome since I first got here. I'm positive 
thai I'll lorm great fnendships here thai will 
last on down the road," saidWhiti/'Incvery 
place that I've been where we've been 
successful, there has been this kind of aimo- 
sphere." 

Coach Whiii is excited about the up- 
coming fcHHball season. His optimi.sm has 
already rubbed off on some of his players. 
He is a very understanding coach and a 
groat teacher. He is good at realizing each 
player's suength and weakness. We all feel 
gcxxl about this coming season," pointcdoui 
defensive back Todd Shearer 

Whitt's posiuon as head track coach is 
something he takes very seriously. "One 
reason I am so excited about Track is that ii 



gives me a great chance to get to know the 
athletes thai will be playing football much 
belter, " said Whiu. 

Whin's coaching career began at Cen- 
ual Davidson High School in Lexington, 
North Carolina after graduating from 
Catawba Collie in 1976. Three years later, 
Whiii was at Clcmson as a part lime graduate 
assistant, and l^cr as a coach residing in ihe 
athletic dorm. During his saond year ai 
Clemson, he was the defensive back coach 
of a national championship icam. His next 
two years at Clcmson Whiii acted as the 
outside linebacker coach. 

From CIcm.son he went to Appalachian 
State where he continued coaching oul.sidc 
linebackers. A year later, he became the 
defensive coordinaier and the outside line- 
backer coach. Whiit stayed ai Appalachian 
unul the sprii^ofl989. 

The following two years he became the 
defensive ccxwdinator at the University of 
South Carolina and then moved on to North 
Carolina Stale University. 

Coah Ridi Whiti is a fine addition to 
what IS a fine athletic deparunent staff. His 
experience and fresh optimism will be in- 
strumental in PCs future athletic success. 



PC Women's Tennis Dominates SAC 



>) ,Shara (larwood 

ITAf-T WRITER 

For the third year in a row the Presbyie- 
lan College Women's Tennis Team has 
*()n the South Ailanuc Conference Touma 
iK'ni The team played in Burlington, North 
arolina, April 10- 1 2 and won a toial of 1 1 1 
x>ints. The second place team only earned 
n points Coach Donna Arnold received 
K-r ihird consecutive SACCoachot the year 
l^^ard 

K' had a player in all of 6 of the singles 
inals and all three of the doubles finals. 
Hiey won 7 ol the 9 matches and every 
iK-mber of the team made the all-confer- 
sic e I earn 



The team is currently 14 in the NAIA 
with Andrea Henderson ranked ihirty-sev 
enih m singlesand Henderson and Catherine 
Scoti ranked twenueth as a doubles team 

PC will be hosting ihe Disuici 2( 
Tournament on April 16-19 Thewinnero 
the tournament automaucally qualifies foi 
the NAIA National Tournament which wil 
be held in Overland Park, Kansas on May 
18-23. Coach Arnold says, "Our goal is u 
win districts. We lost last year by iwopoinu 
so we are determined to win ihis year. Please 
come out and support the leam." 




B/v^/jukJ^ Af^--.:?^^^ 



I 



\^ 1 5% off of any purchase. 
\^(^ Limit one coupon per visit. 
I Not good with other specials. 

! Breakfast Lunch Dinner ^] 

I Expires 5 5-92 ^j^ll J 




pkMo by Brad Bmshtt 



Coach Rick Whitt leads the track team stretching. 



Intramural Softball Standings 



A-LEAGLE 

NATIONAL W L 

riKA 3 1 

Upper Deck 3 1 

EN 2 1 

DX BD 12 

Uderground 4 

dX I 3 

Bad Bombers 3 



Rascals 1 2 

Ulumaie I 3 

KA 3 

i-LEA(;UE 

Canned Heal 3 

DGC 2 



Overweight 2 
nK<t> 2 
IN I 
^X 
HKA 
KA 



1 

2 

2 
2 
3 


CLEAGUE 




NATIONALS 
<)X 2 
Bad Bombers 2 
HKO 1 
OKA 1 
Prairie Dogs 


L 



1 

2 
3 


AMTIRICANW 
Orgasmau-on 1 
Doyle 1 
OX II I 
AKI> 


L 


1 
2 





Tim Williams pitches lor the Overwight Lovers in their victory over KA tuesday. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



8 



THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1992 



I 



Connells* and other bands to visit Carowinds 



by Katherine Bonner 

STAFF WRITER 

The Connells are scheduled to perform 
at Carowinds' Palladium Amphitheatre on 
April 24 at 7 pm to celebrate the end of the 
semester and give students the chance to 
blow off some steam before their final ex- 
ams. Also featured will be Firehose, Buffalo 
Tom, and Dillon Fence (recently featured at 
PC's Spring Swing Concert). Tickelmasier 
centers (704-522-6500) or at the Palladium 
box office. 

The Connells are one of the south's 
favorite alternative groups. Their latest al- 
bum. One Simple Word, has been very 
successful, with such hits as Stone Cold 
Yesterday and Speak to me. The group, 
which has become very popular with college 
students, is made upof Mike Connell, David 
Conncll, Doug MacMillian, and Peele 
Wimbcrley. 

Carowinds has some grcatconcerLs lined 
up for the summer months, including Travis 
Tritt, George Thurgood, Dolly Panon, The 
Temptations, and The Beach Boys. 
Carowmds season pass holders can attend 
any Palladium Concert for just S8.0(). Sea- 
sons passes are available at Carowinds or at 
local Belk stores. For more information on 
Palladium summer concerts, contact 
Carowinds or Ticketmasier. 




The Connells will be performing at Carowinds on April 24 at 7:00 pm. 



file photo 



PC professor presents play 



by Angela Richardson 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

The Last Rose of Summer, a presentation 
by Richie and Gina Prosch, is based on the 
tall tales and stories of Rose Suck.storf. The 
play was performed on April 2 at 8: 1 5 by 
Richie and Gina Prosch, Laura Robinson, 
Biffa Quantz and Dr. Dean Thompson. 

Rose told stories about her life and ad- 
ventures growing up in Bkx)mfield, Ne- 
braska. As a young woman she appears to be 
a suong, corageous, stubborn woman with a 
sense of humor to add life to her stories. 

The scltmg consislal of simple living 
room furniture tocreate a com lortablc home- 
like atmosphere. Chairs were placed on the 
stage, and members of the audience were 
invited to join Rose in her "living Toom." 

Gina Prosch, a member ot the Presbyic- 
rianCollegc English Dcparuncni of English, 
and Richie Prosch a free-lance writer and 
artist wrote the play about Mr. Prosch's 



grandmother. Rose. 

Her adventures include the first time she 
drove a car, and her friendship with a woman 
named Mclha. She recalls bits and pieces of 
her life and shares ihem with her friends and 
family. She tells about her husband and her 
life with him, and she describes in vivid 
detail her life before and after her marriage. 
Freshman Jeff Phillips feels that, "al- 
though iniually confused and ama/.ed by the 
intricacy of the performance, I grew to ap- 
preciate the unusual style. 1 do believe this 
play miirks an exciting turn in modem the- 
ater." 

The play provides a friendly, familiar 
feeling for the audience, and invites them to 
join the past and experience the adventures 
with Rose. Not only is Rose the narrator, but 
the guide on an exciting journey through 
time. 



Campus and Clubs 



SUB to sponsor Tape Fear' 

by Laura Meyers 

STAFF WRIIliR 

Suspense, revenge, defeat, hatred, and fear all come to life in Martin Scorsese's movie 
Cape Fear. A convicted rapist. Max Cady (played by Robert DeNiro), is put behind bars 
for fourteen years. Dunng this time, he plots his revenge on Sam Bowden (playal by Nick 
Nolte), Cady's former lawyer. To witness this psychological thriller, stop by Springs 
Campus Center on April 24 at 7:(X) pm. The showing of Cape Fear is spt)nsored by tlic 
Student Union Board. 



ALPHA DKLTA PI 

Thanks goes \o all our seniors for 
keeping their sense of humor during 
Senior Roast! We will miss you all so 
much! A special congratulations goes 
out to our student te^ichers for doing so 
well on their APTs. We arc very proud 
ofall of our seniors! 

CONGR ATI ILATIONS inuamural 
swim team! We are proud of you all for 
winning the '')l-'')2 championship! 

Black Diamond Ball was a blast! 
Thanks gcKs out to alU)f our sisters who 
warked so hard to make it a success; you 
did a terrific job! 

INTRAMURALS 

The InU'amural [>.*parimcni would 
like to thank everyone thai participated 
in the swim meet, llic winning iciiins 
were Tlieta Chi and Alpha Delta Pi. 
Individual standouts at the meet were 
Jessica McCullough - Alpha IX'lui PI, 
Vanessa McCalister - Zclii Tau Alpha, 
Trip Lacostc - Thela Chi, and Chuck 
Conrad - Pi Kappa Alpha In other 
inirarnural siK)rts concluding in March, 
JtK' Nixon defeated Paul Terry to win the 
annual racquetball toumamcni. 

As of April I St the intramural all 
sports standings ;u-e A League: Theta 
Chi - %.S, Sigma Nu - 2.50. Bad Boy 
Bombers - 195; B League: Theta Chi 
240, Rascals - 220; and Women's Zeta 
Tau Alpha 270, Theui Chi Rush Girls 
- 180. 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

Congratulations to Beth Schlich. 
She is the winnner of the 6 disc player 
given away at the 1992 Cow Drop. 

Last weekend was our annual 
Hawaian Party complete with a SIX piae 
Reggae band - thanks to everyone who 
came out. 

Tau Delta of the week gcx's to Brian 
"the tongue" Thomas. 

si(;ma su,m\ si(;ma 

On Friday, April 10 at K;10, Sigma 
participated in MY l()2.5's Shout in the 
Weekend on the Love and Hudson 
morning show. 

We would like to congratulate our 
new sisters: Slacey Peters, Barbara 
McGhee, Kimberly Siancil and Angela 
Richardson. 

THKIA CHI 

The brothers and pledges ol Ihcta 
Chi attended our annual broihcr/picdgo 
campt>utonApril3, 1992. ThanksioJay 
Puilin for the use of his land in Georgia, 
It was a great time. Iheia Chi and /eta 
lau Alpha also had a successful mixer 
on April 4. April 1 1 was alumni day for 
rhi'l;i Chi. We had a great turnout with 
plenty of activities including a lunch 
lime c(X)k oui, attendance ol iJie Blue 
Hose Soccer alumni game and a great 
band party featuring K"s own "Naked 
Betsy." G(x>d luck to all on exams and 
have a safe summer. 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVl Number 12 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. Souih Carolina 29325 



Fnday. May 1.1992 



Clarke awarded summer research grant 



by Lejeanna Maddox 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Camisha 
Clarke has re- 
cently joined 
ihc ranks of 
outstanding PC 
siudenis who 
have been 
awarded grants 
for summer re- 
search. Clarke 
has received a 
research ap- 
prenticeship in 
mathematics 
from the Mi- 
nority Research 
Apprcnliccship 
Program and 
will spend June 
14- August 8 ai 
The Slate University of New York 
Stony Brook. Sponsored by the US 
Dcpartmeni of Education, the program 
isdesigncd for undergraduate students 
who wish to engage in research work 
with faculty and graduate students in 
the areas of mathematics, marine sci- 
ence, political science, or semiology. A 
total of seventy-five students from 
across the United Slates were selected 




CamLsha Clarke 



to participate, and Clarke will be one of 

only five stu- 
dents taking part 
in the math di- 
vision through 
the Minority 
Research Pro- 
gram. The fel- 
lowship in- 
cludes a stipend, 
housing, food, 
and round-trip 
transportation to 
New York. 
Clarke. a 

Sophomore 
from Miami. 
Florida, is a 
math major with 
minors in media 
studies and 
computer science. Her advisor Luu^icia 
Hunter says of Clarke, "1 find her to be 
quite talented. 1 ihink she is makmg her 
mark at PC." She also commended 
Clarke's ability to write and express 
herself well. Such a combination of 
abilities should prepare Clarke well for 
any profession she may choose lo pur- 
sue after a stint in the Peace Corps upon 
her graduation. 



West named new Blue Stocking editor 



file photo 



Press Release 

The Publications Board and the Russell 
Project Subcommit- 
tee on Communica- 
tions have selected 
Jason West to serve 
as the editor-in- 
chief of the Blue 
Slocking for the 
1992-93 academic 
year. 

West, who is a 
nsing junior from 
Kershaw. South 
Carolina, is a politi- 
cal science and hi s- 
i(M7 ma)or. He is 
the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Waller Jess-: 
West, Jr. West has 
previously served as 
the managing editor 
of \hc Blue Stocking. 

"1 am really looking forward to next 
year," said West. "1 know that my staff and 
1 will ailcmpi 10 conunue the good work that 
was done this year on the Blue Slocking. The 
paper currently .serves as an outlet for stu- 
dent opinion, and it will continue to do so." 

As far as changes to the look of the 
paper. Wcsi says that there will be a few. 
minor adjasunents. "The overall design of 




Jason West 



the paper looks great. I do not anticipate any 

changes in that 
area However, 
next year, we will 
be inuxxiucing a 
permanent col- 
umnLst, we will 
be using more 
graphics and 
charts, the edito- 
rial will be se- 
lected by the Edi- 
tonal Board, and 
we might even 
use some color 
photograhpy in a 
few issues." said 
West. 

West says that the 
Blue Stocking 

_, . staff editors for 

fiU photo ^^^^ y^^^ ^^^^ 

already been selected. The staff will include 
LeJeanna Madctox, managing editor; Ron 
Mixon. business manager; Ted Carmichael, 
politics editor; Ricky Dill, news editor; 
Manha Lynn Smith, features editor; Angie 
Richardson, design editor; Kim Gibson, 
darkroom editor; Heather Moncnef, envi- 
ronment editor; Camisha Clarke, entertain- 
ment editor, Everett Catts, spons editor; and 
Ann Mayfield. ^venising manager. 



Two PC students arrested by Clinton police for 'streaking' 




Streaking is nothing new at PC. In 1988, a Blue Stocking photographer captured this studmt in firont of Neville Hail. 



/lie photo 



by Michele Barker 

Clinton Chronicle 
STAFF WRITER 

Two Presbyterian Col lege students were 
arrestedand charged with indecent exposure 
shortly after midnight Fnday, Apnl 1 7 after 
Clinton police received several complaints 
of four naked male s near the college ' s plaza. 

According to the incident rcpwi, which 
listed "society" as the victim, Eric J. 
Bossman, 21, of Taylors, South Carolina, 
and Phillip Andrew George, 18, of 
Greenville, were two of four men who were 
chased by the police alter complaints were 
received by Assistant Police Chief Carroll 
Barker and K^ Public Safety. 

The two students were placed m jail 
early Fnday morning and bond was set si. 
$248 each. They were released around 5 00 
am, the incident rcpon said. 

Clinton Police Chief Chcsley Richards 
said Monday , ihai the cases were not dis^KJsed 
of m city court ihis week, but |:x-obabIy will 
be disposed of next week. 

Richards said he thought the two men 
cued "suess from having exams" as the 
reason for their aciKHis. 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, MAY 1,1992 



FRIDAY, MAY 1,1992 



FEATURES 



Editor Bids Farewell 



by Dennic Lynn Hill 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



Friends. I am not sure if there is 3ny 
one definition that truly gives justice to 
this word, but I have been lucky enough 
to find many people that represent what 
this word means to me. 1 would like to 
take this time in my last editorial to 
thank many of the friends who have 
supported me this past year during my 
editorship. 

To the unsung "Springs" heroes, 
Paul Scouten, John Douglas, and Roben 
Raines, who made a second home out of 
their offices in Springs; thank you for 
the late night words of wisdom and 
encouragement. It is wonderful to know 
and admire such dedicated people who 
have so much to give. Thank you for all 
you have given me. 

To many faculty and administra- 

Letters to the Editor • Letters to 

Dear Editor: 

On Friday, April 1 2, over 200 athletes 
gathered at Presbyterian College for the 
eighicenih annual Area Five Special Olym- 
pic games. The participanis came from 
Saluda, Newberry, and Laurens Counties lo 
compete in twelve events. 

This day would not have been suc- 
cessful without the help of many pa)ple. 
First of all to Rhonda Sprouse, secretary in 
the Chaplain's office, for her lime in putting 
together the heats and schedules so that each 
athlete could participate in two events. 
Second of all, to Laura Collier, Katie 
Lockwood, Alex Odom, Tracey Doolillle, 
Meg Oxford, Frank McKay, Aaron Miller, 
Valerie Schoenleber, and Marcus Holiday 
for coordinating segments of the day and 
most of all to ihe over 1 50 volunteers who 
executed the games. Thanks for making 
Special Olympics a successful day! 



tors including Dean Moncrief, Dean 
Nixon, Andy Altizer, Martha Ann 
Greene, Dr. Brandt, Dr. Hill, Dr. Prator, 
and Dr. Thompson; thank you for your 
devotion to the students on this cam- 
pus, especially me. You truly exemplify 
the spiritofthiscollege.Yourlove shines 
through to all 
the student's 
lives that you 
touch. Thank 
you for al- 
lowing me to 
receive such 
a wonderful 



fulfill my dreamofbeingcditor. You all 
made it possible for me to succeed. 

To my loving roommate and my 
strong group of friends, the support 
and love you girls have given me is 
overwhelming. True friendships are 
hard to come by, but 1 certainly have 

found just that 
from all of you. 



"// is wonderful to know and 
admire such dedicated people 
who have so much to give. " 



gift.To my family, 1 can not put into 
words how much I love you and thank 
you for giving me the opportunity to 
attend such a wonderful institution and 
to hold a position that has given me a 
chance to see the world from a different 
perspective . I could not dream of a 
more wonderful, giving family than the 
one 1 have. Thank you for helping me to 

the Editor - Letters to the Editor • 

Dear Editor: 

My staff and 1 thank all of the students, 
faculty and staff who assisted us throughout 
the year. We have a wonderful group of 
students known as Caledonians, Highland- 
ers and Slirlmgs who serve invaluable roles 
as tour guides, overnight hosts and letter 
writers. Other students have helped us by 
performing for special events. 

The faculty are gracious in allowing 
prospective students to attend their classes 
and by talking individually with these stu- 
dents when they visit ciimpus. Addiuonally, 
they spend part of some of their Saturdays 
helping us recruit future students. Thanks, 
too, to the maintenance crew and cafeteria 
staff for all they do for us. 

We experience a uue sense of com- 
munity when so many people give of their 
lime and effoas to assist us. Thank you. We 
appreciate your support and cooperation. 



Sincerely, 

Margaret Williamson 

Vice President i(x Enrollment and Dean of 

Admissions 

Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor 



Sincerely, 
Chon Glover 
Coordinator of SVS 



Thank you for 
understanding 
the time that 1 
spent in my of- 
fice instead of 
with you all. I 
know that seemed like most of the time, 
but you all stood by me and encouraged 
me instead of turning away. 1 could not 
have made it without you. 

And last, but certainly not least, to 
my wonderful staff; the hard work and 
commitment that you have given this 
year issimply amazing. You have made 
the Blue Stocking a wonderful publica- 

Letters to the Editor - Letters to 

To the PC Student Body: 

The 1992-93 Student Government As- 
sociation would like lo lake this time to 
congratulate all members of its council on 
thcirekxiions and appointments. We would 
also like to acknowledge and thank the 
members of the 1991-92 Student Council 
for all of its time and effort during this 
academic year. 

We would also like lo congratulate the 
newly chosen FOB and FOB leaders. These 
students will establish what we hope will bo 
a g(X)d first impression for the incoming 
students this fall. We regret that we could 
not accept all of the applicants but encour- 
age those who did not receive this ap[X)int- 
raent to seriously consider applying for SO A 
canmittees this fall. 

During the summer break, we would 
like to ask all students to reflect u\xm their 
year at PC and lo develop ideas for the future 
of SGA and Presbyterian College. This 
coming year will create a multitude of op- 
portunities for everyone, which we hope 
that the students will take advantage of in 
Older to get more involved in campus aclivi- 

• Letters to the Editor - Letters to 



tion. All of your efforts have certainly 
paid off. To Jason West, you have gone 
above and beyond the call of duty this 
semester. You are a wonderful leader 
and 1 know you will take the paper to 
great heights during your term as edi- 
tor. Thank you so much for all you have 
given to this publication. You arc an 
incredible journalist and a wonderful 
friend. 

My time as editor has ended, but 
the knowledge and insight that 1 have 
gaintxi from this experience will never 
leave me. When 1 took this position, 
Andrea Hodgin, editor emeritus, told 
me that I would leave it a different per- 
son. I did not believe her until now. 
journalism has a way of opening your 
eyes, mind, and heart in ways that you 
never dreamed possible. I am thankful 
for the impact this position has had on 
my life and for the opportunity to dis- 
cover such wonderful friends. 

the Editor - Letters to the Editor 



tics. 

As a parting note, we would like to let 
all students know that the SGA office will 
always be open. Please feel free to come by 
any time to voice any concerns or opinions 
you may have about the way things are on 
campus, or feel free tocall the SGA otiicc or 
drop a nolo in tlie SGa\ {X)si office lx)x. 

Sincerely, 
Michael Martin 
SGA President 

Ron Mixon 

SGA Vice President 

Jeff (i am son 
SGA Secretary 



the Editor - Letters to the Editor 



The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume I.XXXVI, Number 12 
May 1, 1992 

Editor in chief Dennic Lynn Hill 

Managmg Editor Ja.son West 

News Editor Paul Atkinson 

Politics Editor Ted Canmichacl 

Sports Editor Brad Busbce 

Entertainment Editor Angie Richardson 

Features Editor [.eJeanna Maddox 

Environment Editor Heather Moncrief 

PhotographyA)arkrtxim Brian Koehler 

Layout Editor Carolyn Nichols 

Copy Editor Mike Weaver 

Advertising Editor Ann Mayfield 

Subscnptions/Exchange Ron Mixon 

Artisl Edward Clark 



Photography Staff 

John Trill Margaret Davis Jason W infield 
Tracy Kura.saka Kimberleo Gibson BillBoan 
Laura Meyers BradSims Patrick John Pfiarr 
lyCeMcAbee MelissaJackson Lisa Weaver 
L^ee Maynard Adriereie Ivey 



Staff Writers 

Elizabeth Spann Amanda Bowers 

Karen Wiltenbr(H)k Frank McKay 

Ed Kirkland Kalherinc Bonner 

Everett Calls Adnenne Ivey NarKy Nt»U)n 

Cher Fulbrighl Midielle Cantey 

Lee Maynard Trenton Arnold 

SharaG»wood Ivtigh Heamburg 



The Hlue Slockirifi is a biweekly student 
publication ol Presbyterian College The pajx'r 
serves as a forum ol news and opinion of regional 
and national concern For advertising, contact 
The Hlue Slocking, Presbyterian College, Box 
1061. Clinton. SC 29325 The Hlue Stocking 
welcomes letters to the editor from all members 
of the pi' community Signatures are required 
Letters arc printed on a space available bias The 
Hlue Stocking reserves the right to edit all letters 
lor projH'r grammar and punctuation The final 
deadline for submilling letters is Friday at 
12 ()()j)m on the week before publication 




^<:^/880 



College to hold 109th commencement 



Press Release 

OFRCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

PresbytenanCollege will hold its 109ih 
Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 
10, with 262 seniors expected to receive 
baccalaureate degrees, and three respected 
leaders in the fields of bus mess and religion 
set to receive honorary degrees. 

Delivering the mam commencenient 
address will be Spartanburg native Dr. 
Harold Dean Thompson, Assistant Profes- 
sor of English, who last month was named 
PC's 1992 Professor of the Year. Also 
speaking will be Tricia Lindrich of 
Richland, South Carolina, who was named 
the college's 1991-92 Outstanding Senior. 

An honorary doctor of humanities de- 
gree will be conferred upon Hugh Shockfcy 
Jacobs of Clinton, former president and 
treasurer of Jacobs Press. Also, an honor- 
ary doctor of letiCR degree will go lo Herbert 
Caldwell Harper of Greenville, chairman 
emeritus of Harper Brothers, Inc. Also,an 
honorary doctor of letters degree will goto 
Dr. J. Howard Edinglon, .senior minister at 
First Presbytenan Church in Orlando, 
Florida, who will deliver the baccalaureate 
address. 

Commencement weekend will begin 
on Saturday, May 9, when the senior class 
hosts a barbcquc dinner for alumni and 



friends beginning at 5:30 pm on the 
college's west plaza. Following the dinner, 
the senior class will host an informal pro- 
gram in Belk Auditorium. 

Sunday's schedule gets underway at 
8:30 am with the fiftli annual ROTC Hall of 
Fame Induction in Jacob Hall's Chapman 
Conference Center. Designed lo recognize 
distinguished mihlarycareersofPCalumni 
who participated in the college's Reserve 
Officer's Training Corps, the ROTC Hall 
of Fame will add Mapr General (Ret.) 
Christian Paite, a 1956 Presbyterian College 
graduate, as a member this year. 

Following the ROTC Hall of Fame 
induction, ROTC senior cadets from PC 
and other area colleges will receive US 
Army Reserve commi.ssions. 

The baccalaureate service is planned 
for 10; 30 am in Belk Audiionum, followed 
by lunch at noon at Greenville Dining Hall. 
The commencement ceremony will begin 
at 2: 30 pm in the Ross E. Templeion Center, 
followed by a reception for the graduates at 
4:00 pm at the lake on the east plaza. 
Presiding over the commencement activi- 
ties will be PC President Dr. Kenneth B. 
Orr and trustee chairman Dr. W. Frank 
Harrington, .senior minister of Peachtree 
Presbyterian Chuch in Atlanta. 




Basebaseball team ends season 



by Everett Catts 
STAFF WRITER 

The 1992 Presbyterian College 
Baseball Team ended its season last 
weekend at the South Atlantic Confer- 
ence Tournament (SAC) in Boiling 
Springs, North Carolina. Afterwinning 
their last six out of seven games, the 
Blue Hose finished the season with a 
22-20 record. Going into the weekend 
of April 17-18, the squad was fifth in the 
conference with a S AC-8 record of 9-9, 
behind fourth place Lenoir-Rhyne. 

With a three game sweep of 
Gardner-Webb, accompanied by one 
Lenoir-Rhyne loss or two Elon losses, 
the Blue Hose could advance to the four 
team double elimination SAC-8 Tour- 
nament. 

The PC team did go on to sweep 
Gardner- Webb, winning 15-3, 16-4, and 
9-3. Wiih Lenoir-Rhyne's loss to 
Wingate on April 17, the Blue Hose 
were m the playoffs for the first time in 
Head Coach Tim Corbin 's career at PC. 
Wiih the sweep of Gardner- Webb, the 
team's conference record improved to 
12-9. 

On April 23, the night before the 
SAC-8 Tournament, an awards banquet 
was held to announce All-Conference 
Selections. Making the 2nd Team All- 
Conference were junior shortstop Gregg 
Desto, who batted .319; senior pitcher 
Ray Canady, who had a record of 6-3; 
and senior pitcher Kris Kirkland. who 
had seven wins and three losses. 
Sophomore rightfielder Joe Henry 
Berube was PC's only 1st Team All- 
Conference Selection. Berube was the 
team's leading hitter, with a .365 bai- 
ting average and led the SAC-8 in 
doubles 

The SAC Tournament started on 
April 24 when PC played Catawba in 
the opening game. The Blue Hose got 
an early lead, going up 3-0 in the top of 
the first. Catawba came back in the 
same inning with two runs, making the 
score 3-2. Catawba later scored three 
more runs, leading 5-3, but PC came 



back in the top of the fourth. After 
scoring a run and loading the bases, the 
Blue Hose regained the lead when 
Berube smacked a grand slam over the 
scoreboard in right field, as the team 
went up 8-5. Berube would be an- 
nounced to the All-Tournament Team 
later that weekend. Catawba would tie 
the score and go up 1 1 -8 in two later 
innings. In the top of the ninth, the Blue 
Hose would come back, thanks to a two- 
run homer by freshman second baseman 
Elton Pollock. The homerun made the 
score 11-10, but PC could not tie the 
game, and the game ended with the 
same score. 

Later that day, the Blue Hose played 
Elon, a team which lost to Carson 
Newman in the first round. Elon got on 
the board early, scoring two runs in the 
bottom of the first. PC later made the 
score 2-1 thanks to Elton Pollock, who 
tripled and scored. The game was post- 
poned because of darkness at the end of 
the fifth inning and would be completed 
the next morning. Despite numerous 
scoring opportunities, the Blue Hose 
were unable to tie the score and lost the 
game 2-1. 

Coach Corbin commented on his 
team's overall play. He said, "We im- 
proved. Wcwereabetlcrballclubatthe 
end of the year than at the beginning. 
The effort in the tournament was good. 
We were loose and played good base- 
ball. We were not nervous, and for the 
most part we outplayed the other two 
teams. 

Corbin also talked about the seniors 
on the squad, his first recruiting class, 
saying, "I'm happy that the seniors got 
to the post season tournament. They 
have been loyal and have shown good 
work habits for four straight years." 

In discussing the team's overall 
play, co-captain Gregg Dcsto said, '"We 
expected at the beginning to do a lot 
t)etter than we did. But at the midway 
point of the season we knew we were'nt 
going to do as well as we'd expected. 



Coach Tim Corbin talks with his players before Ihe game, photo by Steve Owems 



The Russell Program and the PC English Depanmeni are pleased to 
announce a Winter's Workshop to be held on campus June 4, 5, and 6. PC 
students are invited to attend. If interested, please fill out the registration 
fonn below and return it to Ann Adam's office in Neville Hall. For more 
info, call PC exteniion 8463. 

Fees - $75 (covers regisualion, r(X)m, meals) $60 (covers regisu-alion and meals? 
$50 (covers rcgisuaiion and room) $30 (covers regisu-ation) 



Please place a check mafk t)y the side of the workshops that you wish to attend You may 
choose two If you choose two, the workshop staff will ass<gr^ you to Round 1 (Friday) and 
Round 2 (Saturday) Check also m the appropriate space if you plan to submit a maniwcript in 
advance for consideration tjy the workshop leadei If enough manuscripts are submitted to a 
workshop leader one of the rounds of that workshop may be set aside tor those who have 
submitted manuscripts, the other round will tie for those who have noK submitted manuscnpts 
in advance All manuscripts shouKI be mailed by May 15 to the address below Write 
prominently on the back of the envetope the workshop for which you wish the manuscript to be 
considered Remember to place a check mark below opposite the manuscript type to indicate 
that you will be sending it by May 15 



Name 



P C Addreta 



P C Phone 



WORKSHOP 

1 Writing Fiction 

2 Writing Poetry 

3 Writing tor the Stage 



WORKSHOP LEADER 

Starkey Flythe 
Carolyn Forche 
John MacNichoMa 



Home Address 
City, State, Zip 
Telephone ( ) 



Amount enclosed 



4 Writing on Personal Expenenoe Beth Thames 

5 Writing Newspaper Features Jim Cornslison 

6 Wnting for Chiklren Nancy Ruth Patterson 



MANUSCRIPT 

One chapter or story 

Five poeow 

A one-act play of 

not more than 25 pages or 
a scene from a ptay, with a 
pwagraph synopsis of play 

One exsmple 

One e*mr\fHe 

One exampte 



ENVIRONMENT 



FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1992 



CONORATULATIONS 




GRADUATES 



New officers selected for 1 992-93 



by Heather Moncrief 
ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 

Officers for the 1992-93 Recycling 
Board have been selected. Chairperson will 
be Heather Moncrief, secretary/treasurer will 
be Todd Love, and IPC representative will 
be Benjamin Jones. The faculty, staff, and 
administrative members will remain the 
same: Dr. Jerry Slice- faculty advisor, Mrs. 
Charlotte Slice, Mr. Skip Zubrod, and Mr. 
Jack Robertson. Representatives from Stu- 
dents for Environmental Education and 
Women's and Men's Councils will be se- 



lected in the fall by the groups' newly- 
elected presidents, Bill Wright, Shelly 
Carson, and OuinBynum. The one remain- 
ing position on the board, representative 
from the student body at large, will be filled 
in the fall; anyone who is interested in this 
position should contact Heather Moncncf, 
ext. 8951. 

The program has made impressive 
strides this year. Hopefully, it will remain as 
strong next year. Thanks goes out to all who 
were members of the RecyclingTa.sk Force 
and to Jodie Will and Jeff Smith for a job 
well done. 



Campus Recycling Statistics 


FIRST 


SECOND 


TOTAL RE- 


AMOUNT 


AMOUNT 


CYCLED 


ITEMS (LBS.) 


(LBS.) 


MAlLRlAinm) 


CANS 610 


480 


1 ,090 


GLASS 403 


283 


686 


LEDGER PAPER 493 


266 


759 


NEWSPAPER 1,597 


L808 


3,405 


CARDBOARD 406 


129 


535 



Earth Day celebrated on campus 



by Heather Moncrief 
ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 

Presbyterian College cel- 
ebrated its third annual Earth 
Day Sunday, April 26. Booths 
were set up by several student 
groups including Student Vol- 
unteer Services, the Recycling 
Board, Westminster Fellow- 
ship, Beta Beta Beta, Zeta Tau 
Alpha, Sigma Sigma Sigma, 
Pi Kappa Phi, Theia Chi as 
well as by Mrs. James elemen- 
tary school class. Music was 
provided by local musicians. 
While cool weather apparently 
kept many students away from 
the celebration, many local 
citizens with young children 
enjoyed an afternoon of learn- 
ing about our environment. 

Students for Environ- 
mental Educatii)n would like 
to thank all of those who par- 
ticipated and attended Earth 
Day '92. 

Tshirts as well as" Re- 
cycle PC" stickers and canvas loie/grwery 
bags are still available. If miersested, call 




Mrs. James' elementary schiKil class shar-^s in the 
festivities. 



Kaihryn, at ext. 8785. or Chirlotie, at cxi 

8484. 





««M» 



^ 



photo by Heather Moncrief 





Rob McCredie performs at Karth Day. 



EAT IN - CARRY OUT - DKLIVKRY 

199PIZZASPECIAL! 



X] 



With I\irchase Of Another Mcdiiiiii 
Specialty Pizza at Regular Pikc 




Any One 

_l Medium Specialty Pizza 

4lutONLY$.99 



Not gcxxl with any other coupon offer or PC. discount. 
One coupon per party per visit at the Clinton Piz^a Hui only 
Mustpiescni coupon with purchase. 



Tioose rroni 
Icat Lovers 
'hccsc Lovcr.s 



.Pcppcroni Lovers 
.Supreme 



fPEPSlJ 



THE BLUE 



,/<2iS^^ 




STOCKING 



"Give the people the lif;ht, so they may find the way." 



Volume LXXXVII Numtx-r 1 



PKFSBYIEKIAN COLLEGE 



Clinion, Soulh Carolina 29325 



Fnday, Seplembcr IX, !'^^2 



Campus crime statistics show slight decline for last year 



PC CAMPUS CRIME STATLSTICS 



CRIMES 


1991 


1990 


1989 


Aggravated Assault 








I 


Arson 











Burg ary 


57 


63 


53 


Motor Vehic e Tlicft 


T 





2 


Murder 











Rape 











Robbery 











ARRESTS 


1991 

5 


J990 

19 


1989 


Alcohol Violations 


3 


Drug Violations 


1 








Weapons Violations 












The Presbyterian College Public Safety Department submits 
uniform crime reports to the Clinton Police Department for 
inclusion in State and FBI crime statistics. 



b> Ricky Dill 
NEWS tDITOR 

The, 1991 year at Presbyterian 
College saw a slight decline in criminal 
activity, according to the Public Safety 
office. Statistics showed a drop m the 
number of burglaries, alcohol arrests, 
imd complaints of trespassing on cam- 
pus. 

In 1990 there were 19 alcohol re- 
lated arrests at PC. This number fell to 
fwc in 1991, though there were 18 ar- 
rests off campus and three DUI's which 
PCsecuniy traced from other agencies. 
Statistics indicate that there were 57 
burglaries on campus, which resulted 
in S15,4{K) worth of lost merchandise. 
Some of that merchandise, $3,585 to be 
exact, was recovered. According to 
Presbyterian College Chief of Secuniy 
Grcy Mayson, that figure is not neces- 
sarily an indication of student thefts, 

Mayson rcporis that about 60 per- 
cent of the recoveries in thefts were due 
to "Project ID." Mayson suggest that a 
bigger response from students toward 
"Project ID" would not only help in 
recovenng stolen items but would also 
eventually cut down the amount of bur- 
glaries taking place on campus 

"I think students have become more 



aware of public safety because of pub- 
licity dunng the last few years, and they 
are willing to take steps to make sure 
their campus is safe," Mayson said. 
"Because they are more interested in 
their safety, they relate well to the public 
safety staff." 

Last year 65 students registered 
their belongings with "Project ID," 
Chief Mayson was happy with student 
participation because the pmject was in 
us first official year. For the 1992-93 
school year only 32 students have reg- 
istered so far. That number is excep- 
tionally low considering the amount of 
anouncements and letters sent out to 
inform freshmen and transfers how 
helpful "Project ID" can be to them 
Public Safety has decided to go around 
and knock on doors, urging students 
once again to take the time to fill out the 
ID forms. 

"People believe that this is such a 
safe campus and ihey trust their fellow 
students to the point that they wont 
think twice about leaving their doors 
unlocked," Mayson said. "It is a safe 
campus, but alot of ihc burglaries arc 
due to walk-ins - people who do not 
belong on the campus. The numbers 
could be reduced if people would lock 
their doors and mark their possessions." 



Applied Ethics Program inaugurated during 1 13th Opening Convocation 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

MANAGING F-.DITOK 

Amid the pomp and circiiiitsi:itKC ol 
0[KMiing C\)nviKaiion, Scpleinhcr 8, was a 
day of new beginnings at Presbyterian Col 
lege. The assembly, honoring the cla.ss of 
1993 and PC's scholarship patrons, markoii 
the official beginning of the college's 1 1 Uh 
academic year, 

As a com[X)neni of ilie larger celebra- 
tion, the day also honored the inauguration 
of thccollcgo'sncw Applied 1-thics Program, 
nuido possible by a grant from the Knight 
1-oiindalion. t)r, Sissela Bok, world 
reknowncd author and clhicisl. addressed 
the a.sslemhiy on the topic "Applied Ethics: 
Liberal Arts Serving the Huturo " 

Iho Knight I'oumkiiion, lo whitti ap 
plication m.iy \x made by invitation only, 
announced the award in September 1991, 
and since that lime plans have Km maile to 
fully imploment the thrcc-yeiK program. l)r 
Richard Baker. Assist;inl l*rolessor of Phi 
losophy and progranu(H»rdinaIor, explained, 
"Tho commiiiee which has been h)rmed to 
develop and C(X)rdinate this program envi 



sioncd it as one that would be interdiscipli- 
nary in nature, including all academic de- 
partmcnLs and touching all areas of campus 
life We envisioned a program that would 
address ethical issues in public and pmfes- 
sional life as well as in private lives." 

When fully expanded, the program will 
invc>lvc not only the philosophy deparmieni 
but will envelop the areas of biology and 
business, as well. 

Dr, Sissela Bok Kirrowed from Dr. 
Samuel Jt)hnson to define applied ethics as 
'ethics put to the use of life " Whereas 
ethics has historically baMi studied v>n a 
purely theoretical level, there has been a 
recent emphasis on the application of ethical 
theories to everyday situations. According 
to Bok, the necessity of practical apphcauon 
has Iven ushered m m the past three decikles 
With the growing issues of homelessness, 
corruption in government, animal re.search, 
and dispt>sal of nuclear iu-ms. 

Bok stressed that applied ethics must 
Ix'come a part of educational curriculum, as 
many students are not ex|X)sed to such 
training in the home orcomniiinily. 

"Students all over this country and in 




PC President Dr. Kenneth H. Orr and Dr. Sis.sellii Bok helped usher in the U3th 
academic year during Opening Convocation on September 8. phi>to by Sieve Owms 



crcasmgly in many other counuics want to 
be able to think ihrixjgh ethical questions 
they encounter in a more rigorous way." 
Shecimiinues," Ihey want to have the chance 
to think ahead, not just sikldenly lo be con- 
fronted in a work siluatuw with a legible 



dilemma and to be frightened into doing one 
thing w another 

Corxludmg hf acklress, l>i>k challenged 
the Prcsbytenan stutk-nis and faculty to let 
their lives be a torch, an in.spiratHMi which 
can be passed on to future generations. 



EDITORIAL 



IkiDAY. SHPTF-MBFR IS. IW; 



American students have no idea where they have been or where they are going 



bv Jason West 

Et)ITOR-IN-CHlEF 

Two weeks ago, I was read- 
ing an education journal and 
came across an article which 
detailed a recent study of high 
school students in the Western 
World. This particular study 
compared the educational 
sianclards and achievements of 
Americans with those of stu- 
dents from France, Germany, 
Belgium, ect. The study con- 
cluded that Americans were the 
least intelligent of the world's 
industrialized people. 

The study found many 
American students not able to 
answer basic science and math 
questions, not able to speak 
grammatically correct, and not 
able to answer quest ions about 
geography and history. The 
stuciy proved that American 
kids are not prepared for the 
21st Century. 

After reading this article, I 
began to ponder on why 
Americans were thought to be 
so "uninformed." I honestly 
believe that American students 
are not dumb or stupid; they 
are just confused. 

Richard Lederer, a high 
school teacher from Connecti- 
cut, believes the same thing. A 
few years ago, he compiled a 
"history of the world from 
actual student test answers col- 
lected from high schools and 
colleges across the United 
States. 

Lederer concludes that 
Americans are so "shallow" 
because they don't understand 
their history and are confused 
about their origins. 



The following are soine of 
the responses which Lederer 
has collected. (One has to 
wonder if any of these re- 
sponses have ever appeared in 
the "blue books"ofPrebyterian 
College students.) 

*The inhabitants of ancient 
Egypt were called mummies. 
They lived in the Sarah Dessert 
and traveled by Camelot. The 
climate of the Sarah is such 
that the inhabitants have to live 
elsewhere, so certain areas of 
the dessert are cultivated by 
irritation. 

* Moses led the Hebrews to 
the Red Sea, where they made 
unleavened bread, which is 
bread made without ingredi- 
ents. Afterwards, Moses went 
up on Mount Cyanide to get 
the ten commandments. 
Solomon, one of David's sons 
had 5(K) wives and 5(K) porcu- 
pines. 

*Without the Greeks, we 
couldn't have history. The 
Greeks invented three "kinds of 
columns - Corinthian, Doric, 
and Ironic. They also had 
myths. A myth is a female 
moth. One myth says that the 
mother of Achilles Clipped him 
in the River Stynx until he be- 
came intolleraole. 

*Socrates was a famous 
Greek teacher who went around 
giving people advice. They 
killedhim. Socrates died from 
an overdose of wedlock. In the 
Olympic Games, Greeks ran 
races, jumped, hurled the bis- 
cuits, and threw the java. 

*The Renaissance was an 
age in which more individuals 
fell the value of their human 
being. Martin Luther was 



nailed to the church door at 
Wittenburg for seliinu papal 
induluences. He died a hor 
rible death, beinuexconimuni- 
cated by a bulT. Guicnburg 
invented the Bible. Sir Waller 
Raleigh is a historical figure 
because he invented cigareiies. 
Sir I'lancis Drake circmnciNed 
the workl with a 1(K) foot clip 
per. 

*Queen FJi/abeih was ihc 
Virgin Queen. As a cjucen. she 
was a success. When Ivii/a 
heihexposed he rse 11 before her 
troops, they all shouted "liur 
rah. Then her navy went out 
and defeated the S[)ainish Ar 
madillo. 

*Christopher (\)luinlnis 
was a great navigator who dis 
covered America while ems 
ing about the Atlantic. The 
winter of 1620 was a hart! one 
for the settlers. Many pei)ple 
died and main babies were 
bom. Captain Jt)hn Smith was 
responsible for this. 

* Abraham Lincoln's 
mother died in infancy, and he 
was born in a log cabin which 
he built with his own hands. 
When Lincoln was president, 
he wore only a tall, silk hat. 

All kidding aside, the re- 
sponses whic-h Lederer has 
collected are a sad coinmen 
tary on the slate of American 
education. America issuppos 
edly the most powerful, most 
industrial, most edueated, most 
prosperous nation on the earth. 
However, it would appear that 
the majority of Ameneans are 
not able toexplain just how our 
nation evolved to this point. 

I believe that if you do not 
understand history, then you 



The Blue StfM:king of Presbyterian College 
ClinU)n, South Carolina. 29325 
Volume LXXXVll. Number 1 
September 18. 1992 



Editor m Chief Jason West 

Managmg Editor IxJcann Maddux 

News Editor Ricky Dili 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

SptnLs tuJiior Everettc Catts 

Enienainmcnt Editor Camisha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather MoncTief 

Photography Editor Kim Ciil>s«)n 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



Advertising Eidiior. ., 
Subscriptions Editor. 
Artist 



Ann Mayficld 

Kon Mixon 

...Michael Chrisicnsen 



Photography Staff 
Kimberlee fiibson Todd Love 



Staff Writers 
Eli/abcth Cunard 
LvCigh Hcarnburg 
Kristina Pruilt 
Paula Wanen 
Brian Saccu 
Kim Kabon 
Tobin Turner 



will certianly not understand 
the future. If Americans think 
that SirWalierRaleiiih invented 
cigarettes, and if Americans 
can't add and subtract, and if 
Americans caniu)t explain the 
principle ofeellular respiration, 
then we have no place leading 
tlie world into the next century. 
It is time we as a nation 
finally took a look at where we 
have fx'en, where we are now, 
aiKJ where we are going. God 
helf) us to regain our sense o{ 
know le(hK'. 



Amanda Bowers 
Katherine Bonner 
Chc7 Fulbright 
Michelle Caniey 
Shelly Phipps 
Jamcy Pate 
Tenia Snead 



I he Blue St(Hkm^ is ,i biwcikly Mudciii puhli 
cation of Presbyterian College The p,i[XT serves 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional ajxl 
national concern For advertising, tonlacl I he 
BlueStocking, Presbyterian C()llcj;i', H„n l(K,i , 
Clinton. SC 29325 Ihe Blue SKHkinji w«--| 
comes letters to the editor from all members of 
the PC community Signatures are required. 
l>etters are pi inletj on a space avaiLtble bias Ihe 
Blue Storking reserves Uie right lo win u|| Icitcrs 
for proper grammar and punctuation Tlie final 
deadline for submitting letters is Friday at 1 2;()() 
pm on the week before publication 





l-RlDAY.SHPTHMBh:R IS, 1992 



wews 



Policy to deal with campus alcohol problem 'more openly' 



by Tobin Turner 

STAF-F WF^ITF.R 

As the 1992-93 school yc;ir progresses. 
PC siiidonis will quickly receive a clear 
message from faculty. suttf. and adrnlnisira- 
lors thai drunken behavior will not be toler- 
ated. 

Several new progranisaiid policies have 
been iniplenienied lliis year to deal with the 
on-campus alcohol problem, including a 
new list of 'sanctions ihal will serve a.s 
standard penalties for alcohol violauons by 
individuals. 

Anysiudenteaughtinviolaiionofschcx)! 
alcohol policy on campus will recieve a SM) 
fine or a 12 hour work detail in addition to a 
mandatory eight hour risk reduction class. 

A second offense would result in a S 1 00 
fine or a 24 hour work detail, a second eight 
hour risk reduction class, and contact with 
the (illender's parents. 

A third offense would result in sus- 
jvnsuMi. 

Breaches ol suie law. such as take 
id's, serving minors, and underage drinking, 
can result in lines up to S UK) and the loss of 
driving privileges for. 90 days. Clinton City 
policy prohibits open alcohol coni;iiners in 
mostpublic places, including sidewalks and 
roadways. Alcohol is also prohibited on 
campus, except in "wot" rooms, \Uiere tx)ih 
cKcupanLs are of legal age. 

The administration's stricter attitude is 
due in large part to the Alcohol Advisory 
Committee, which is chaired by Dr. Jik'I 
Jones and includes other faculty representa- 
tives, members of the Student Affairs sialf. 
members of the Student Ciovernmeni Asso- 
ciation, and memk'rs of the Creek and So- 
cial Ijfe Committee. 



"The Advisory Committee found alco- 
hol abuse to be a widespread problem among 
a UK) large pt.'rceniagc of PC students - a 
problem that needed to be dealt with more 
openly," said Jones, 

The college will be placing heavy em- 
phasis on student awareness of the alcohol 
problem during the 1992-93 sch(K)l year. 
One program designed as a risk reduction 
program for students is OCTAA (On Cam- 
pus Talking AN)ul Alcohol), which is for 
individuals experiencing any type of alco- 
hol-related problem. The plans are to imple- 
ment OCTAA in various areas of campus 
life, but the program fcKuses primarily on 
PE 101: Concepts of Pysical Education, a 
course required for all freshmen. 

Another program on campus is 
BACCHUS (BiH>st Alcohol Consciousness 
Concerning the Health of University Stu- 
dents). The goal of B ACCH US is to help the 
campus address the needs and problems 
ass(Kiaied with the misuse and abuse of 
alcohol. FVer-to-pecr mtluencc w ill be used 
to tight myths about college drinking, to halt 
students from driving while intoxicated, and 
to feature alcohol-free social evcnis. 

The Student Affairs Office will once 
again orgam/e Alcohol Awareness Month 
in (Xtolx'r, which is designed to enlighten 
the entire campus community on collegiate 
alcohol use. Scheduled lo s|X'ak during 
October .ire David Leschke, director of 
chapter services lor BACCTIUS, and Kim 
.Mexander. a paraplegic whose injuries re- 
sulted from a drunk driving related automo- 
bile accident. 

College officials hope that new alcohol 
measures will educate students, raise 
awareness and abstinence, and decrease 
abuse. 




PC security ofTicer Kensia Coates prepares to patrol the campu.s. Public Safety will 
be responsible for enforcing the college's alcohol policy. photo by Kim Gibson 



Class of 1996 largest freshman class in PC history 




S(;,\ Vice President Ron Mixon (left) and Assistant Director of Student Activities 
(hris Patterson (right) frolic on the "Slip and Slide" diirmg l-nshni.in Orientation. 
This year's freshman class is the largest in P( history. /'^. ,\mn,i ShiMii>\ 



by led Carmichael 

P()I.IT1CS EDITOR 

! he first month of school is always 
exciting, with seeing old friends for 
the first time m months, getting into 
the routine of classes, and meeting 
the hoards of new students. Bui this 
\c,ii ihcrc .ire quite a few more 
freshmen than anyone expected 

The class of 1996 is the largest 
single class in the history of Presby- 
terian College. Out of the 9-S7 stu- 
dents accepted. 348 decided lo stari 
their college career here, which is 
nearly M) more than were expected. 
What's mt)re, the average SAT score 
of the incoming class once again is 
higher than that of the previous year's. 
1 he loial population of Ihe school 
IS now 1 167, rcpreseniing 25 differ- 
eni states across the US and seven 
different countries. Thai's a far cry 
from the 908 students that were here 
in l^JS.s (Or. for that mailer, the 4:-> 
Ol so vse luul m |0^^ I 



But don't expect the population 
to continue growing as fast as it has in 
the last few years. The 

administration's long term plan is to 
keep the student body between 1 150 
and I 2{)() students for the next few 
years. 

And don'i think having so many 
nu)re students than expected didn't 
present any problems. The Dean of 
Students Office ended up pulling 
students m Douglas House. Bailey 
Hall's lounge, and other alternate 
housing. Also, some students were 
forced to share mail boxes for the 
first part of the year. Even GDH has 
experienced ihe overpopulation, with 
lines that sometimes exceed half-an- 
hour or more, 

Still, the problems were not in- 
surmountable (especially with 
S7()0.()()0 in extra tuition nmney ), and 
having such a strong freshman class 
IS well worth the trouble associated 
with It. 



FEATURES 



IkII)AY,SHPTHMI{l-:R IK, 1992 



PC student feels 'lucky' to have survived the wrath of Andrew 



by Paula Warren 
STAFF WRITER 

II was jusi after midn ighi when (he first 
waves, lightning, iliundcr and rain came and 
winds of 50-75 niilcs-per-hour began. The 
"screaming winds" sent shivers up the spines 
of those waiting through ihc twelve hours of 
the storm. All one could do was listen to ihc 
sound of the objaLs being thrown against 
houses. The only thought was "we're going 
to die," as Uie last thing heard on a walknian 
was that the eye of Hurricane Andrew ripfXHl 
through South Dade County, Florida, home 
of Cher Sadler. 

Sadler, a junior at PC. and her parenis 
were at their home when Hurricane Andrew 
hit Florida in the early morning hours of 
August 24. Mandaiorycvacualion had been 
called for North Miami, Miami Beach, 
Biscayne, and coastal-lying residential ar- 
eas. Sadler's home is in the Cutler Ridge 
area, about ten miles north of Homestead. 

"The only preparations my family had 
made were to fill our two tubs and the 
washing machine with water, to have candles 
and matches ready, to make sure the torches 
were working, and to fill our vehicles with 
gas," said Sadler. "The wail at the gas 
station the Sunday before the hurricane was 
over two hours. The lack of ply w(X)d and ilic 
expensive cost of the plywood left our win- 
dows unboarded. Then, ihconly thing Icfi to 
do was sii and wait." 

The Sadlers first began their wail in the 
living room, until pebbles and tiles began 
crashing through the tront windows. After 
the power went oul, they moved to ihc 
kitchen, where they .sat together by candle- 
light. 

"My father was unusually calm during 



the storm. However, my motherhidherface 
throughout the hurricane," commented 
Sadler. "The .scariest part of the storm was 
hearing our possessions being ripped away 

and not being able to do anything about it." 
Around 9:(X) am, the last bands of tlie 
storm came through ihe ciiy. There was 
enough light to view the tremendous dam- 
age done around ihe neighlx)rhoods. It was 
also at this time lliat yells were heard. 
Neighbors were yelling for other neighbors, 
making sure everyone was alive and needed 
no assistance. 

"My family was really lucky. The r(K)f 
in my rcx)m and in die two bathrooms col- 
lapsed, and there was also extensive water 
damage. The house will need a new rcx)!. 



ceiling, and walls. My family feels luckier 
than most, as we have half a r(X)f and some 
walls," said Sadler. 

Sadler said that the area looked like a 
post-nuclear war movie. Complete blocks 
or entire communities no longer cvist 
Homestead and Florida City were hk)\ui 
away. Even though most (Hjsscssioiis were 
ruined or blown away, [X'ople were able to 
find .some sense of humor, l-orexaniplcoiie 
sign in the Sadler's neighborluKnl read, 
"Home is where your roof landed'" 

Houses built before 1%S survived ilie 
hurricane belter than those constructed al ler 
that dale. Luckily, the Sadler home fell inii) 
the first category. Whole communities of 
prefabricated houses lell Linlike some ol 




Cher Sadler's truck bears witness to her hurricane experience of just u lew weeks 
ag«). Sadler is a PC junior and a resident of Dade County, Florida. 



ilie lu)me^ in the Charleston iu'ea during 
Hugo, Datle Coum\, l-lorida had building 
ctxles which said houses had to be con- 
siruetedtosusLiin windsupto 12()nHlesper 
hour. 

■'I teel my house sustxnned less damage 
tx'eause it was a corner house and was not 
laemg the winds. There were two sets of 
v*. iiul direciions. The hurricane moved from 
east lo Vkcsi, hut the circular rotation of 
u iiuls around the storm went north to south. 
Those houses lacing north and south were 
demolished," said Sadler. 

"Iloinestead and the surrounding areas 
\uie the hardest hit. The people in these 
areas were angry because the first nevvs 
reports were about llie city of Miami, where 
there was some lhK)d and tree damage. The 
new s meilia and rescue teams did not come 
u) see the real ilaiiiage - homes, il a home 
A as lell, and areas with no elecU'icity, run- 
iiiiiL' w.iier, or telephone service - until four 
i!.i \ ^ al ler the hurricane," commented Sadler, 
It \ooV the Sadler family lour days to 
I'ei water again. It may take four to six 
months to get telephone and electricity lines 
replaced. Sadler recenily coniacted her 
mother and itiere has been no change in the 
area 

"Imiiieituiiel) aller die hurricane, the 
MCtims' primary wDrry was where to find 
iheii iiexinieal. The tear i)f looters was also 
vers great While the water is now on again, 
II i^ siill unfit to drink," .said Sadler, 

Items needed in ihe area are charcoal, 
.aimed goods, ni)ii-perishables, liygemc 
iieiiis, vaiidles, bottled water, and related 
iienis leelings of sorrow and pity are not 
needed. Sadler w ill be going honic in alx)Ut 
iwo weeks It) Like sup[)lies. If anyone wDuld 
like to donate items such as those listed 
alx)ve, please contact her at SSH.V 



ROTC combines leadership,excellence and excitement 



by Christie ( I rant 

STAFF WRriER 

Until the Vietn:unW:ir, K' required all able- 
bcxlied Ireslimai iuul soptxMnores to take ROTC 
aspanoftliervquinxlaMvcurriculum. Asarvsull, 
PC students excelled on c;uii[xis as miliLiry lead- 
ers and abroatl as valuuii fighting .sokliers. 

"It' s beai aa)und lor seventy-tlirec ycitrs," 
said Ca{)t. Paul LX;Ruri, Assistant Profes.sor of 
Militar)' Science. "It's a part of ilie cx)llege's 
hisiory ■ a stnmg [xul of its hisury- luid ak)i of 
peo|)le don't wiuil it to go away. 

T'he college's R071' prognun is off lo a 
suxMig suut this year witli large enn)llmcnt :md 
several exciung acUviUes |)l:uine<l. Over one 
hundred freshmen are enrolled, ;ind sixteen 
sophcMiKMUs are cumcntJy ixirticiixiUng in tlie 
program. Stuiknts may ekxt lo titke ROTC all 
four yairs and strive lo achieve higlier military 
ranks and a p)s.sibk' army commission. A 
beginning ciKk't will laim customs and tradiUoiis 
oflhcService.iuUotKilckdense.lealersliipck'vel 
opnx;nt, eiliics, nuuuigement, fiux'ss pn)gnuns, 
aixl [)rofcssioniilLsm. 

(>i Se[)lcmbcr Ih, iIk* coq)s will go white 
water railing (k)wntlK'N;uit;iluilii River in Nonii 
Can)lina. Tlwn on November 13-l4,cordideixx' 



levels will \x high as tlie corjis travels to Fort 
Jackson for a field tmining exiv<,liUoii. 

rx-F-luri also commented tluit tlie rifle club 
will Iv e\[XUKled lo a rille k'iun iJiis year. He 
In )|x\s to luivc a nlle nuitch widi WolToal at K"s 
ritle mnge lluit is l(x;iled Ivhind Tem[)lelon In 
aildition aR:ingerPlatix)ntluiwillliKusonexini 
Uamii urvival skills, and iKlventua's will 

eiuibksUuleiiLstodomoa' tilings oulsick" of class 

Accx)rding it) iX'f-'luri, '"The short lenvi ad 
vanUigcsofuii Mig ROTC are iK'Iping students gel 
stniie axiuiitxl Ixxirs and heli)ing lxx)st tlien 
(iPA's Hie course ls not aademicallly taxing 
iuid il hel|)s ex[X)se you todiflervnt tilings. lx"ad 
ersliip |)rinciples and (xgiim/;itJOiuil skills aa' 
g;uncd because you aa' pLiced in lUienvinMimeni 
tlial fosters leiidersliip." 

AndlK'addsquickly,"'I'hck)ng-lennailvan 
lage IS a lifekmg (f){X)nunity to serve." 

ROTC scholarshi()s ;ia' aviuLible f(K two or 
thavyciirs. r-ijchschokirslupixiysmosloftuiUoti 
andoniiimpusex|xnsesas well as allowing lor 
iexth(X)ks, classnxnn sup()lies, and ct|uip«ix"nt. 
Students wlx) nxcivc an award must aiuun an 
undcrgraduale ck'gra' in llie field in which tlx' 
scholirsliip IS aw;ialed If inleaMed, contact 
Ci»|)Uiin lX'MuriorC;ij)iain lX'lx)nihConk'y, 




H()IN(;!ltisalongwaydown(orstudenlsaslhe>t;,kep:i,tinR()l( 'sopenrapelling 
day. RapelhnK is jusi one oflhe many adventures awaiting R()T( participants. 

photi) by Stevf Owens 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBIiR IK. 1992 



FEATURES 



Honor and Ethics: 

'It mailers more than anything else' 



by Martha l.ynn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

"Il matters more dian anything else," 
S(H:rales said referring to honor and ethics. 

"Ethics has always been studied theo- 
retically," said Dr. Sissela Hok, renowned 
edncist from Harvard liniversiiy,"but, eth- 
ics can tell us nothing unless applied." 

If eUiics "matters more than anything 
else" but no one knows how to apply them, 
then Presbyterian College students living in 
a corrimuniiy governed by a strict c(xle ol 
honor and in an imperfect world are faced 
with a great challenge. 

The Knight (irant 

However, Presbyterian College is em- 
bracing an opportunity to face that chal- 
lenge, PC IS an honored Knight Foundation 
grant recipient and will use the S2.37,(KX) 
received from dial grant to fund an applied 
ethics levture and curriculum |)rogiam. The 
next three years will show a pronounced 
effort lo incor]K)rale practical eihics into die 
curriculum. 

The first series ol this ellorl is called 
"Medicine, Ethics, and Society," leaving 
ofK-n the possibility tor ethical debates on 
topics such as euthanasia, abortion, AIDS, 
confidentiality, healthcare, aiul more 



extent in at le^st ten incidenLs of lying, 
cheating, stealing, plagiarizing, and toler- 
ance o\ an offense. 



It is .^:(K) iim. A student has been 
studying lor two days but seems to be 
gaming noground in studying for a test that 
could determine whether or not he is able lo 
slay al PC. He Ixiws to the pressure, 
disregards the Honor Code, and decides lo 
cheat. 

With a Presbyterian College degree in 
hand, Uiis same student lies to his boss on 
a reguku- basis, cheats on his wife, is an 
alcoholic and is under mvesiigalion for 
accepting bribes and extortion. He is dis- 
graced, and so is anyone else who holds a 
Presbyterian College diploma. 

4i » * « 

Not only was Presbyterian College 
one of eight institutions lo receive a grant 
from the Knight F-oundation, but il was also 
specially selected locompeie for diis honor. 

Philosophy professor Richard Baker 
IS coordinating the applied ethics program 
at PC. He illustrates an example of applied 
ethics in the PC Refxirt 

"We read 'Huckleberry Finn' in one 




The Spirit of PC Irailitional bag|)ipers lead ihe professional of faculty and .seniors to 

begin the 1 1 Mh academic year This year's convation address inaugurated the Knight 

Program oi Applied I'lhics 

phfHo by Aim Gibson 



I he lloniir Code 

M(Hlelcd on a successful honor code at 
Davidson College, the present ciKJe was iiukIi 
fied by Mtuleni initiative in P)8') to Iv sepa 
rale but not divorced from ihe Cixle of Con 
duel and to include stiller |vnalties IX' and 
riie Citadel are ihe only institutions in South 
Carolina to have an Honor Ccxle. and as many 
who have traveled w ill lesiily, many schtxils 
u|) North do not abide by any such ctule 

Inilie jiasi three years, the Jiulicial Couii 
cil has enlorced (he honor code lo llie lull 



ol my classes, and when Huck decides ihai 
he IS willing to go to hell lo save his friend 
Jim, the runaway slave, then I want ihose 
students to see and feel that as a noble and 
courageous decision on Huck's part," s;iid 
Baker. 

"I want them to feci the im|X)ruinte of 
ethical issues and lo see itw beauty of 
ceruiin actions." 

To feel the imponance ol ethical is- 
sues ami to apply them in daily life : ihat is 
Ihe challenge Ix'cause "It mailers more 

than anyihingelse" 




Little Known Facts 



In ihe hisiory of PC, there have been a lew aiiempLs to change ihc institution's name. 
Il was previously called Clinton College and then the Presbyterian College of South 
Carolina before its name waseventually shoncned lo Presbyterian College. Other n:ime 
change suggestions throughout the years have included Poinsett College, Pickens 
College, Pinckney College, Palmetto College and Douglas College. 

^ * * * 

The PaC SaC got its name from the xronym for the Eresbyicrian College of South 
Carolina. It was first published under thai name in 1914, but the first yc;irbook, the 
Garnet and Blue , was published in 19{X). 

a new regular feature in The Blue Slocking 



Gocd news in one hundrcd words or less 




Provided by SVS 
as a new weekly feature for 
The Hlue S{o(kinf> 



I suppose I finally realized wh;ii it means 
when people s;iy tlui in giving wc racivc. 
When I weni with Habiiai for Humanity to the 
house in Cireenville to work alongside the 
family whichconsisiedof anelderly man and 
his grandchililrcn, 1 was suqiriscd lo find oul 
how grateful they were for what ihcy had - 
each other. TJic little boys made the mosi of 
things as they showed off their hand springs 
and other ;Ka)baiic feats. Wc laughed to- 
gether m die face of w hat seem to be impov- 

enshmeni. 




Welcome 
freshman 
and 
Transfers/ 



from: 



The Blue Siocking 




FEATURES 



ikii)ay,si-:iti-mbi-:r ih, 1992 



PC student feels 'lucky' to have survived the wrath of Andrew 



by Paula Warren 

STAFF WRITER 

Ilwasjusl after midnighl when ihc first 
waves, lightning, thunder and rain came and 
winds of 50-75 niilcs-per-hour began. The 
"screaming winds" sent shivers up the spines 
of those wailing through the twelve hours of 
the storm. All one could do was listen to the 
sound of the objects being thrown against 
houses. The only thought was "we're going 
to die," as the last thing heard on a walkman 
was that the eye of Hurricane Andrew rip[)ed 
through Soutli Dade County, Florida, home 
of Cher Sadler. 

Sadler, a junior at PC, and her parents 
were at tlicir home when Hurricane Andrew 
hit Florida in the early morning hours of 
August 24. Mandalorycvacuaiion had been 
called for North Miami, Miami Beach, 
Biscayne, and coastal-lying residential ar- 
eas. Sadler's home is in ilie Cutler Ridge 
area, about ten miles north of Homestead. 

"The only preparations my family had 
made were to fill our two tubs and the 
washing machine with water, to have candles 
and matches ready, to make sure the torches 
were working, and to fill our vehicles with 
gas," said Sadler. "The wait at the gas 
station the Sunday before the hurricane was 
over two hours. The lack of ply w(xh1 and the 
expensive cost of the plywood left our win- 
dows unboarded. Then, the only thing left to 
do was sit and wail." 

The Sadlers first began their wait in the 
living room, until pebbles and lilcs began 
crashing through ihe front windows. After 
the power went out, ihey moved to die 
kitchen, where they sat together by candle- 
light. 

"My father was unusually calm during 



the storm. However, my mother hid her face 
throughout the hurricane," commented 
Sadler. "The scariest part of tlic storm was 
hearing our possessions being ripped away 

and not being able to do anything about it." 
Around 9:(X) am, the last bands of the 
storm came through ihc city. There was 
enough light to view the tremendous dam- 
age done around ilie neighlx)rhoods. It was 
also at this time that yells were heard. 
Neighbors were yelling for other neighbors, 
making sure everyone was alive and needed 
no assistance. 

"My family was really lucky. The rcx)f 
in my rcx)m and in the two bathrooms col- 
lapsed, and diere was also extensive water 
damage. The house will need a new r(X)f, 



ceiling, and walls. My family feels luckier 
than most, as we have half a roof and some 
walls," said Sadler. 

Sadler said that the area looked like a 
post-nuclear war movie. Complete blocks 
or entire communities no longer evist. 
Homestead and Florida City were bknui 
away. Even though most possessions ucre 
ruined or blown away, people were able to 
find some sense t)l humor. Fore\:imple,onc 
sign in the Sadler's neighborhoi)d read, 
"Home is where your roof landed!" 

Houses buili before 1968 survived the 
hurricane better than those constructed alter 
that date. Luckily, the Sadler home lell mn) 
the first category. Whole communities of 
prefabricated houses fell liiihke some ol 




Cher Sadler's truck bears v*itnes,s to her hurricane experience of just a few weeks 
ago. Sadler is a PC junior and a resident of Dade County, Florida. 



the homes in tlie Charleston :irea during 
Hugo. Dade County, l-loriila had building 
cixles which said houses had to be con- 
structed to sustain winds up to 1 20 miles per 
hour. 

"[ leel my house sustxiined less damage 
because it was a corner house and was not 
lacing the winds. There were two sets of 
\'v Hid directions The hurricane moved from 
east to v^esi, but the circular rotation of 
winds around the storm went north to soutli. 
Those houses lacing north and south were 
demolished," said Sadler. 

"I loinesiead and the surrounding areas 
were the hardest hit. The people in these 
areas were iini'ry because the first ne\\s 
reports were about the city of Miami, where 
iliere v^as some Hood and tree damage. The 
news media and rescue teams did not come 

10 see the real tlaniage - homes, if a home 
\'.as lell, and areas with no eleciricity, run- 
niiii' v^aier, or telephone service - until four 
lias sailer the hurricane," commented Sadler. 

It took the Sadler lainily lour days to 
uei \>.aier again. It may take four to six 
months to get telephone and eleciricity lines 
replaced, Sadler recently contacted her 
moilier and there has been no change m tlie 
area. 

"liiiiiKui.iu I', alter die hurrkaiie, die 

victims' primary \Korx\ was where to find 

ilkir next meal. The learof kxHerss^asalso 

ery great. While the \s aier is now on again, 

11 IS siill unlit to drink." said Sadler. 

Items needed in ihe area are charcoal, 
.aimed goods, non-pcrishables, hygenic 
Items, candles, k)itled water, and related 
iieiiis l■eelllli'.^ ol sorrow and pit> are not 
needed. Sadler will be going honie in about 
iwo weeks to take supplies. I f anyone wt»uld 
like to donate items such as those listed 
alx)ve, please contact her at SKK.V 



■RIDAY.SEPTF.MBHR IS. 1992 



FEATURES 



ROTC combines leadership,excellence and excitement 



by Christie ( I rant 

STAFF WRlll-R 

Until the Vieuuun War, PCrequiredallable- 
btxJied Ire.sluiien and soplxMnorc* to t:ike ROTC 
aspari of tlie rujuia^d a)re curricul um. Asa re.sul t, 
PC suideiiLs excelled on c;mifXLs as milit:iry lead- 
ers and abrxKid as valuuit righting sokliers. 

"it' s ba-ri around lor seventy-iliree years," 
said Capt. Paul DcFluri, A.ssisiani Pn)les,sor of 
Militiiry Science. "It's a part of iIk* college's 
history - a stnxig piin of iLs hisux">'- ;ui(l ak)i ol 
pa)|)le don't wiuit it to go away. 

The college's R(J1X' pnigrun ls off to a 
sinxig start this year with large enn)llment ;uid 
several exciung acuvitics pLinned. Over one 
hundred freshmen arc enrolled, luid sixteen 
soplKxnores arc currcnlly |xiruciixiUiig in tlie 
pf\)gnun. Students may ekxt to t;ike ROTC idl 
f(Hir years and strive to achieve higlx-r military 
ranks and a possibk.* army commission. A 
beginning axk'l will Iciim customs aixl tradiUoiis 
of the Service, nalxxuil ck'fensc, lealersliipde vel 
ofMix-nt, cilixs, nuin;igemeni, fitness [xognuns, 
and prolessKMiiilLsm 

On Sepiembe/ 2(), liic cx)qjs will go white 
water rafung down iIk N;uiuiluilii Ri vex in Norili 
Carolina. 'IV/i on November l3-l4,conlidcrKX 



levels will Iv high as tlie cori)s tiiivels it) f-ort 
Jackson for a field training ex|X'<iiUon. 

rX'Fluri also commenicxl tlut the rille club 
will be expiuxled U) a rille ie;uii tins year. I le 
hofx's to luve a ntle nuitch witli Woffonl at rK"s 
rille ainge lluu ls kxiiled tx-hind Tenipleion. In 
adtlitJon.a RiuigerPlalixHi tlut will lixason extra 
tnuning, morc survived skills, iuid utlveniurcs will 
emilile suidenls todo morc tliingsouLsitk' of class 

Acc4)rding to IX'l-lun, '"Ihe short lenn ad 
vmitiigesoltiiking ROTC arc- helping siudenLs gel 
some rctjuiaxl hixirs arul helping btxKt tlieit 
CiPA's. Tl)e course ls not acadcmicallly taxin[' 
;uid It liel[7scxpt)seyouU)diflercni tilings. Ix'ad 
ership principles luul (xgani/;iiioiuil skills ;ia' 
gamed ba'iiase yiHKiR' pkiced in an eiivironniciii 
lliat fosters leailerslii[)." 

Andheaddsquickly,"'[k'k)ng-L'nnailvan 
tage IS a lifek)ng op5X)rtunity to serve." 

ROTC sch( )larships arc* avaikible f(x two or 
tlirccyeitrs. Fuxhsch()l;irsliippaysnK)stofUiiUon 
luid on-ciini[ms exixiises as well as alkiwing l(x 
U'xib(X)ks, classnxHi) su|)plies, and w|uipiix'nL 
StudenLs wlx) receive an award musi aiuun an 
undergrtKliuUe degax; in tlie field in which tlx' 
sthokirsliip IS awarded If interesii'd, wHitiicl 
C;i{)t;iin I X'lluri or Captain iX-lxr.ihConk'y. 




\ 




IJ()IN(;! II is a long way d(mn for students as lhe\ lake part in |<( ) K's 
day. Rapelling is jusl one of the many adsenlures availing KOK p; 

f'hol 



open rapellinj} 
irlici()ants. 

by Steve Owens 



Honor and Ethics. 

'It matters mote th 

by Martha i.ynn Smith 
FEATURES EDITOR 

"It matters more Uian anything else," 
ScKTales said referring to honor and eifncs. 

"Ethics has always been studied theo- 
retically," said Dr. Sissela Bok, renowned 
ethicisi from Harvard University, "but, eth- 
ics can lell us nothing unless ap()lied." 

if ethics "matters more than anything 
else" hut no one knows how to apply ihein, 
then Presb>ierian College students living in 
a cor'nnujiiity go\erned by a strict ctxie of 
honor and in an imperfect world are faced 
with a great challenge. 

The Knight (Irani 

However, Presbyterian College is em- 
bracing an opportunity to face that chal- 
lenge. PC IS an honored Knight Foundation 
grant recipient and will use the $2.37,(KX) 
received from that grant to fund an applied 
ethics lecture and curriculum program. The 
next three years will show a pronounced 
effort to incor]X)rate practical ethics into the 
curriculum. 

The first senes ol itiis ellort is called 
"Medicine, Ethics, and Scxieiy," leaving 
o[K-n the iK)ssibiliiy lor ethical debates on 
topics such as euthanasia, abortion, AIDS, 
confidentiality, healthcare, and more 



an anything else' 

extent in at least ten incidcnLs of lying, 
cheating, stealing, plagian/mg, and lolcr 
ance of an offense. 



It IS 3:(KJ am. A student has been 
studying for two days but seems to be 
gaming no ground in studying lor a test that 
could determ ine whether or not he is able lo 
stay at PC He bows to the pressure, 
disregards the Honor Code, and decides lo 
cheat. 

With a Presbyterian Col lege degree in 
hand, ihis same studeni lies to his boss on 
a regukir basis, cheats on his wife, is an 
alcoholic and is under investigation for 
accepting bribes and extortion. He is dis- 
graced, and so is anyt)ne else v^ho holds a 
Presbyterian College diploma. 



Not only was Presbyterian College 
o\K of eight institutions to receive a grant 
from the Knight Foundation, bul it was also 
s[x'cially selected tocom|x.ne for this honor. 

Philosophy professor Richard Baker 
is cm)rdmating the applied ethics program 
at PC. He illusu-ates an example of applied 
ethics in the PC Reixni. 

"We rc^Kl 'Huckleberry Finn' m one 




The Spirit of I'C rraditional bagpipers lead the prixcssional of faculty and .seniors lo 

k'gin the 1 1 Uh acatlemic >ear Ihis year's convalion address inaugurated the Knight 

Program of Applied I lines 

phiHo by Kun (Uhson 



The Honor Code 

MtHJeled on a successful honor coile at 
Davidson College, the present ctxIe was mcxli 
fied by siudcni initiative in 198') lo Iv sepa 
rate but not divorced from the Cixle of Con 
duel and to include stiller [XMuilties. I*C and 
■Rie Citadel are the only iiisiiiutums m South 
Carolina lo have an Honor Cixle, and as many 
who have traveled will testily, many .sch(X)ls 
up Nortfi do not abide by any such ctxte 

In the pasi three years, the Judicial ( 'oun 
cil has enlod cd ih'" hunor i (xle 111 Ihe lull 



ol my clas.scs, aiul when I luck decides that 
he IS willing to go to hell lo save his friend 
Jim, tlie runaway slave, then I want those 
students to see and feel that as a noble and 
courageous ilecision on Hiick'spari,"s;iid 
Baker. 

"I want them to feci Ihc im|X)ruincc of 
ethical issues and lo see the bcauly of 
cert;iin actions." 

\\) leel ihe iinpoitance ol ethical is- 
sues and lo apply iliem in daily life ; ihat is 
the challenge bivause "It mailers more 
than anything else" 




Little Known Facts 



In ilie history of PC, there have fvcn a lew attempts lo change the institution's name. 
It was previously called Clinton College and then die Presbyterian College of South 
Carolina before its name was eventually shortened to Presbyterian College. Oihcrname 
change suggestions throughout ihc years have included Poinsett College, Pickens 
College, Pinckncy College, Palmeilo College and Douglas College. 

* * * * 

The PaC SaC goi its name from the iicronym for the Eresbyierian CoHf^gc of South 
Carolina. It was first published under that name in 1914, but the first yearb(X)k, the 
Garnet and Blue , was published in I9(K). 



a new regular feature in Ihc Blue Stocking 



Good news in one hundrcd words or less 




Pro\ided by S\S 
as a new weekly feature f«)r 
The Hlue Stocking 



I suppose I finally rcali/cd wh:it ii means 
when people say that in giving wc receive. 
When 1 went with Habiiat for Humanity loihc 
house in Greenville lo work alongside ihc 
lamil) which consisted of an elderly man and 
his grandchildren, I was suqiriscd lo find out 
how grateful they were for what they had - 
each other. The little boys made the most of 
things as they showed off their hand springs 
and oiher iKrobatic feats We laughed lo- 
gether in die face of what seem lo be impov- 
erishment. 




Welcome 
freshman 

and 
Transfers! 



from: 



The Blue Siocking 



FEATURES 



IRIDAY. Si:i'ri:MBI-:R IS, 1992 



KIDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1992 



POUTICS 



Political experts bring presidential campaign to Presbyterian 



Press Release 

Office of Public Relations 

To most South Carolinians, the 1992 
Presidential Campaign is a far-removed 
event. Although residents of tlic stale v^^ill 
cast their votes for George Bush or Bill 
Clinton - and be directly affected by the 
results - they arc denied access toan insider's 
view of the campaign. 

This fall, three renowned political ex- 
perts who have been skiring their views 
with national audiences will bring the elec- 
tion and its implications closer to home for 
South Carolinians when Presbyterian Col- 
lege hosts a three-part scries on the race lor 
the White House. Gergcn, who has also 
served as edilor-at-large for U.S. News and 
World Report and as news analyst lor I he 
MacNeili'Lehrer Newshour on PBS, will 
focus on "The 1992 Elections: A Republi- 
can Perspective." 

At 1 1:(K) am on Tuesday, Oct. 13, in 
Belk Auditorium, fomicr Assisi;mt Secre- 



/r 



tary of Slate Bob Bcckel w ill address "The 
1992 Hleclions; A Democraiic Perspec- 
tive." Bcckel .served as the director of Walter 
Mondale's 1984 presidential campaign, and 
iscurrentlyhosiingtheFoxNeiwork'spublic 
affairs show. Off the Record. He is also 
serving as ihe political analyst for CBS Ihis 
Morning during the 1992 campaign. 

Completing tlie series on Tuesday, Nov. 
17,willbePulil/er-prizcwinningcolumnisi 
David Broder, who will present an overview 
of ihc campaign during his uilk, "The 1992 
Elections: APost-Mortem." Broder,recog- 
ni/ed as one of the nation's top political 
analysts for his work with 'Ihe W'ashin^ion 
Post, will speak ai 1 1 :(X)am in Belk Audito- 
rium. 

The series is being co-sponsored by 
Presbyterian College's Russell Program and 
the Leciuresand Fine ArLsCommiitee. Each 
eveni is free and o[x.mi to the public. 





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Bush, Clinton discuss education 



by Lei^h Heiirnburg 
STAFF WRITER 

In a Business Week poll (Sepi. 14, 
l*'M2). when asked Iidw ihey would 
rale ihc quality ol American sch(^)ls, 
only 3 pcrceni ol ihe public responded 
with "excelleni," while 36 perceni. said 
"only lair," and 23 perceni ralcd iheni 
'■p(H)r." With those kindsol numbers ii 
IS obvious that public education in 
America is in trouble, at least in the 
eyes ot the public. A.s the presidental 
ckciion draws near, jK'ople are turning 
U) the "education president" and his 
opponent to see what ihe tulure ot 
education in America could be. 

While Bush's Secretary of Educa- 
iion, Lamar Alexander, has recicvcd 
hiuti praises from both sides of the 
lH)litical spectrum. Bush himself has 
been another story. His "America 
2(H)()" plan for education has gotten 
much h(x>pla and press, but critics aic 
still skeptical. It proposes education 
improvement eflt)ris to center in on 
"lour trains" or "li>ur tracks." Those 
tracks arc liush's education aims for 
Ihe coming decade. They are: ttxlay's 
students, tomorrow's studenis, work- 
ers out of sch(H)l. and families/ com- 
mumiies. in addition to this somewhat 
ambiguous propt)sal, the Eiush ciunp is 
quick to point out that funding for 
education has increased 40 perceni, in 
inllaiion adjusted dollars, since 1982. 
(Perhaps this is an indication that 
throwing money at the .sch(X)l system 
isn't the answer, since there has been 
no improvement in basic math and 
language skills). 

Now that education has become an 
important issue in thl^ election, Bush 



ha.s begun to show more interest in 
the subject. His op[X)nent, however, 
is also turning to this issue. Clinton, 
in his criticisms of Bush's efforts, has 
begun to uilk about the more serious 
issues that need addressing. Regard- 
less of all the mudslingmg, he has 
/crocd in on America's need to be 
able to compete on an international 
level. He has also emphasized the 
need lor a great deal more attcniion 
and funding to go toward improving 
the system as it now stands. Clinton 
said, "If you had the chance. ..lodecide 
the course of yourcoun try , which one 
would you ch(x)sc? Anybtxly who 
knows anything about the world 
would chtxisc education." 

Clinton has also proposed a Na- 
tional Trust Fund with an initial cost 
of S20 billion, divided over a lour 
year period. It's purpose" w ould be to 
provide financial aid to college stu- 
dents, and would be paid back cither 
by payroll deductions or comnmniiy 
service. 

While lx)lh sides are throwing out 
plan after plan, proposal alter pro- 
posal, and criticism after criticsm. 
Americans arc beginning to l(K)k at 
education in a new light -and arc 
beginning todecide which man really 
would be "the education president." 
Accordmg to the BtLsiness Week poll, 
Clinton is clearly the candidate of 
choice in this regard. Forty -nine 
percent of those polled thought he 
would do the best job ol improving 
education, while only 35 [Krccnt said 
Bush would. Still, the election is 
another month and a hall away, which 
leaves a k>t of pandering riH>m lor 
both cailuiatcs 



NAFTA treaty will boost economy 

At' ihinnc clanH r>r»w lariffc h<^l\i/f>f>n ih 



J 




DtnuK-ratic presiden- 
tial candidate Bill 
( lintiin ikfti rt'Cintly 
made a campaign stop 
in (Olumhia, South 
Carolina. .\ group of 
VC students (right) 
bra\ed the crowd to 
hear the candidate's 
message. ( linlon fac"^ 
President (Jeorge Bush 
in the November gen- 
eral election. 



by Ted Carmichat'l 
milTlCS EDITOR 

It has been shown, ihcoretically and 
historically, that free trade between coun- 
tries IS beneficial, in ihc long run, for the 
economies of all the counines involved. 
Since tariffs and quotas artificially rai.se the 
cosLs of goods, consumers aren't able to buy 
as much. But when you remove that artifi- 
cial cost, demand rises and the buyer gcLs 
more for his/her money. Furthermore, 
producers expand lo meet the increase in 
demand, which in turn creates jobs. This 
then puts more money into people's hands 
and demand goes up again and. ..well, you 
gel the point. 

That's why so many economrsis are ex- 
cited about the North Amcnca Free Trade 
Agreement (NAFTA). Creating a market of 
}6s million consumers with a combined 
GNP of S6.4 trillion can only help the 
economies of Canada, the United Slates, 
iind Mexico. It would also speed up the 
process of dividing the world into three 
major trading bl(Ks, giving us an important 
edge in competing against Asia and the 
EurofK^in Community. 

Labor unions, however, worry that under 
this agreement many manufacturing jobs 
would be lost to Mexico. Since hourly 
wages there are roughly one-eighth that of 
the LIS, It's not very difficult to imagine 
American industries moving ihcir plants 
south of the border. Still, many plants are 
already being moved to Asia or going under 
to foreign com{x.'tiuon. Therefore, keeping 
the manufacturers in this hemisphere trans- 
lates into more business for American sup- 
pliers. What's more, Mexicansalready spend 
aK>ui S4() billion a year on American gixxls. 
As their pcr-capita income gcvs up, our 
e\[X)rLs to Mexico arc sure to increase as 
well. 



As things stand now, tariffs between ihc 
three counines average from about five lo 
ten percent, although some individual ones 
are much higher. For example, products 
such as cocoa arc increased by as much as 20 
perceni in Mexico. American apparel 
manufacturers arc protected by a 33 percent 
tariff, and tequila is hit by a 183 percent duly 
in Canada. If NAFTA is passed, however, 
these and other rcsiricuons will be rolled 
back over the next 15 years. 

Not everything will be unregulated, of 
course. Car imports to America must have 
at least 65 perceni l(x:al contenuand Mexico 
has refused to allow foreign ownership in iis 
energy industry, as stipulated by iheir con- 
stiiuuon. Canada is also pushing for protec- 
tion of Its television and publishing mdus- 
iries, similar to that allowed for in ihe free 
trade agreement between them and the US. 
Neverihelcss, under NAFTA, many major 
mdusiries w ill be open to compeuiion, and 
key non-iariff barriers will be removed as 
well. For example, dair> and cotton quotas 
will be reduced in Canada and the US, and 
Mexico has agreed to let American compa- 
nies invest in their banks and sccuriucs 
firms. 

Passage of the treaty isn't expected to 
meet any difficulty m the US. President 
Bush IS strongly in support of il and is 
pushing for its passage through the Con- 
gress. He has been cniicizcd, however, for 
pushing the negoiiauons to an early relea.se, 
just before the GOP convention. Some 
cniics contend also that cenain environ- 
mental concerns have been overlooked be- 
cause of the rush. Clinton, on the other hand, 
has adviKated free trade in principle but is 
stalling his support for the treaty, as it is 
w ritten, in order to keep from losing support 
from organized labor. 

Despite the poliucing, most people arc in 
favor of the agreement. And surely nobcxly 
will complain about the boost all three 
economies are sure lo gel. 




SPORTS 



8 



irii)ay,si-:pti-:mbi-:r is, iw: 



FRIDAY. SEPTCMBHR IK, 1992 



SPORTS 



Blue Hose edged by Fairmont State Falcons, 12-10 



by Fverett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

In a baillc oi defenses, ihe Blue Hose 
Football Team started the 1992 season on 
September 5 against Fairmont State Col- 
lege in the firstmeeting between the schools. 
In the hot and humid Fairmont, West Vir- 
ginia, the Blue Hose came up short. 
Fairmont Slate took the lead with a first 
quarter touchdown. PC came back with a 
44-yard field goad in the second quarter by 
Alex Horton. The Blue Hose defense, led 
by John Dow, shut down the Falcon offense 
for the remainder of the half. PC took the 
lead 10-7 near the end of the saond quar- 
ter, when quiirterback Tim Da v is connected 
with wide receiver Todd Sims for a 30-yard 
touchdown. Alhalftime the score remained 
10-7. 

Neither team could score in the third 
quarter, thanks to the excellent play of both 
defenses. But Fairmont Stale tightened the 
score 1 0-9 when a puni snap went out of the 
end/one for a safely with 5: 1 5 remaining. 
After receiving the free kick, the Falcon 
offense drove down the field and kicked the 
winning field goal with 1:07 left in the 



game. Unforiunaicly, the Blue Hose of- Head Coach John Perry commented quarterback was pressured a lot, and we 

fcnsc was unable to score on their final onihegame, saying, "Wedidn'thavene^irly worcoulol sync." 



possession, losing the ball on downs with the consistency we wanted. We didn't 
33 seconds left. exociiie as well as we wanted to. The 




IX'spiie the loss, nuiny [xisuives came 
from ihe game. When asked about the 
defense. Coach Perry said. "Our defensive 
effort was very good, and I hope that trend 
coniinues.'" Perry added, "The dctense 
kepi us in the game." 

Perry also announced the players ot 
the week, fhe ol tensive player was wide 
receiver Todd VVofford, who had three 
catches f()r4S yards. The defensive player 
was defensive lineman John Dow, who had 
nine tackles (two for losses) and a s;»ck. 
Coach Perry alst) |M)inied out freshman 
linebacker Antonio Merriwether, who bad 
tour tackles. I he oiiisiantling special teams 
player was Alex Horton, who accounted 
for four of PC's ten points wiih a field goal 
and an extra [H)ini. 

Coach Perry commented on ihe team's 
week oil and ii[Kt)ming game against 
lurmaii tomorrow. Perry s;iid, "We used 
ilie week lo work on overall execution." 
Regarding I urman. Perry said, "They 
haven't changed a great deal in the last ten 
years. We've been vsaithing tilm, anil we 
know wluil lo expect." 



PC's Eric Byrd (22| attempts lo pull away from a hairm(mt .State detfndtr during 
PC's sea.son opener. phoio by Steve (>wcn.\ 



Men's soccer shuts out opponents 



by Kverette Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

Coming off last year's 1 5-3-2 record, 
the 1992 Blue Hose S(Kcer Team opened 
the season in quick fashion againsiHigh 
Point on September 5. Twenty-Nine 
seconds into the game, John Mairs scored 
the first goal. Jason Wcxxlall got the 
assist. Both Will Lindsyom and Norman 
DeWaari later scored to give the Blue 
Hose a 3-0 win. DcWaart's goal was 
assisted by Dan Walbot. 

On September 9 K' dcleaicd long 
time rival Erskinc College, a team the 
Blue Hose defeated for the first time last 
year. 2-1. Will Lindstrom .scored the 
first goal, with an assist by Robert 
Coding. Chns Bnino added two goals, 
the first on a penally kick and the second 
from a Chris Napior assist. Thus the 
final score was 3-0. 

The Blue Hose squ;ul opened con- 
ference play with a I -0 win over Wingale. 
Chris Napior .scored PC's only goal. 
More importantly, the team got their 
third shutout of the season, which is a 
g(xxl sign following last year's eight 
shutouts. 

Fven though they have played well 
at the start, the Blue Hose have a long 
season ahead. The opfwnents to come 
include Clcmson, Wofford, Lenoir 
Rhync, Catawba, and USC. HcadCoach 



Ralph Poison commented on the team's 
.schedule, saying, "By far this is the 
toughest schedule we've ever played. " 
PC, ranked 1 7ih in the nation and lourih 
in the South last year, plays teams m the 
lop twenty in the NCAA I^iv.l and II and 
the NAIA. 

When asked alnnil iliis yeai > u.nii, 
Assisiiint C(Kich Bret Boulware said, "I 
think overall ihe team is belter than lasi 
year. The loam speed has improved 
along with the calil)er of the sub players, 
who have [)e rformed wel I com i ng ot f the 
iKMich." Coach l\)lson adtled, "It's a 
g(xxl team. We started out wiih two 
solid wins, the third less glamorous, but 
still a win." 

When asked about the freshmen on 
the squad and the team's level of play, 
Poison said, "The freshmen seven total 
is one of our largest; all have a lot of 
potential. Some have contributed right 
away, while others t;ike time to develop. 
I'm excited aboui where we are now and 
where we can go, but we're not ck)sc lo 
the level of playing we should be. We 
hope to peak at the end ol the season jusi 
like last year." The Blue Hose won the 
'91 SAC roumamenl. After playing 
Carson-Newman, Clcmson, and Mars 
Hill on tfie roiid, K' returns to play 
Wofford on September 30. 



Women's soccer team i emains 
undefeated after five <^ames 



h> .Amanda Bnwiis 

sixR-WRJit R 

Saturday, Scpiemlni ^ iiiaiked 
ihe beginnini' ot \\\v !'*o; season 
tor ihe women s st)ccer leain Alter 
only live games, Uie l.atly Blue Hose 
have scoretl a lolal ot t? coals and 
have liad oiiK iv^o si .ij'.onsi 

itiem. 

Coai. ti Brian Purcell is very o *, 
(.lied about llus season. " The tresh 
men are tilimj' iti well, and ilie up 
perclassmeii aie [ilayiiig ihe hcsi 
soccei Ive evei seen llieiii pl.iy 
This year's leaiii is veiv solid,' he 
said 

Ihe Lady Blue Hose won itieir 
lirsi game 9-0 against High Point 
and their second match H) ()a)'ainsi 
Agnes Scott Ihen on .Sepicinber *), 
ihey deleaied long -lime rival 
Lrskine College ^> () Coach Purcell 
said thai while he was optimistic 
about the game, he had no iilea ii 
would br NO niic sided (ioals lot 
ihc Hose weie scored by Missy 
IUiller( \), .Siephanie Smith (2), and 
Nicki Sodcrberg (2), with one goal 
each contributed by Charily Bra/eal 
and Lli/abclh Welborn 

According to Co ca[)laiM Nicki 
Soderberg, "This is the lirst nine in 



ttie history ot PC women's soccer 
that we ve heai l\rskine, who is a 
big rt^ ii '>t()urs. To beat them '' 
mak en belter btnause they 

I, 

■\V. il; I ilie te.iin this 

yeai. the l.iUiv liiuc Hose are led 'oy 
their tour |uniors Miss\ Butler, 
Stephanie Smiiti ami i'o e.i[M.iins 
Nuki Node 1 1>(.- 1 )' .mil K.iltileen 
Douit ( 'iMv li I'uu ell IS [tleased 
\^ lUi then woi'h 

"Ihey are noi onU (lie leaileis 
in age, hut Ihey aie .ilso ilie best 
[ilayers, " he says 

Some o! tlie goals lie lias set toi 
tlie team meliule having a winning 
season, making ii to the conlerence 
linals, and being one ol the lop lour 
teams ciualilying lor the Disiricl 20 
tournament 

Co captain Kathleen Dowd also 
waiils lo make il tt) the conlerence 
finals. She feels thev have the ]-ni 
teniial lo win it all 

She comments, "We have alot 
ol talent lliis yeai th.il is pulling 
together and should lake us far \Ve 
are a young leam and have alot ot 
polenlial. I am very e\ciled!" 

Ihe Lady Blue Hose posted their 
most recent victories this weekend, 
defeating Wingale 6() and Lenoir 
Khyne S :^ 



Bill Nave saved these 
kids from drouning, 




W^ but he's not 



a lifeguard. 



Verleeta Wootcnfow^d 



seve 



ral 




new stars, 



hut she's not 



an astronomer 



These are 
teachers. But 



to the kids they reach, 
they're heroes. 




BE A TEACHER. 
BE A HERO. 

Call 1-S00-45-TEACH. 






RMCh lor the PiMMf 

iL/%v II 



Spirit abounds on cheerleading squad 



by Brian Sacco 

STAFF WRITER 

Often overlooked by fans ai football 
games, the PC cheerleading squad provides 
enthusiastic suppon and promotes school 
spint on a weekly basis. This year's squad, 
coached by Susan Poison, practices two 
hours every day on their rouiines, which 
require agrcat deal of concentration. During 




the summer, they attended cheerleading 
camp at East Tennesce State University 
and earned a superior rating for their ef- 
forts. The 1992-93 squad is composed of 
seniorsShellcyEidson, Andrew Smith, and 
John Noble; juniors Boyd Moms. Laura 
Pate, Bryan McGill, Jcanie Kim, Keith 
Walker, and Lori Randall; and sophomores 
Tabilha Stokes, Craig Sireeiman, and Mary 
Beth Brumbelow. 

Few people realize the extent to which 
cheerleading requires a student-athlete to 
have a diligent work cthic and a great deal 

Few people realize the extent to 
which cheerleading requires a 
student-athlete to have a diligent 
work ethic and a great deal of 
commitment to the teams. 



.lunior Laura Pate cheers at the Fairmont 
State Kalcon (lame. photo by Steve Owens 



of commitment to the teams. The squad 
must prepare for every football game and a 
majority of the men 's and women 's basket- 
ball games. Cheerleaders must also main- 
tain a 'C average to remain eligible and 
can cam varsity letters by cheering for two 
consecutive seasons. This year's capiajns, 
Shelley Eidson and Andrew Smith, would 
like to see this year's fans become more 
involved and more enthusiastic at the games; 
nevertheless, they are grateful for the fans 
who consistently suppon Blue Hose ath- 
letics 



Volleyball team starts season 



by Kd Kirkland 
STAFF WRITER 

The 1992 Lad> Blue Hose volley- 
ball team's season is already under- 
way, and the team, ranked 22nd in the 
preseason, has gotten off to a 2-0 start 
with wins over Newberry on September 
4 and Columbia on September 8. Head 
Coach Beth Couture commended the 
play of Lisa Kimbrcll and Kristy 
Tarallo, The squad was also runner-up 
in the Steam Catawba Tournament, 
September 11-12. In the opening round, 
ihe Lady Blue Hose defeated St. 
Andrews On the ne.it day, the team 
lost to Catawba in the second round but 
rebounded to beat Queens in round 
three. In the semi-finals, the Lady Blue 
Hose defeated USC-Spartanburg. Un- 
toriunately, the leam losi to Catawba 
again in the finals. 

After LiNi soar's amazing 42-4 
record, this seal's squad is trying to 



make Its own mark. While il would be 
hard to forget about the accomplish- 
ments of the '91 team, this ycar'sgroup 
is working hard to find its own identity. 
With three returning starters and others 
with playing experience, the Lady Blue 
Hose have a good nuclcusupo t which 
to build. Captains Ashley Jenkins, Lisa 
Kimbrell, and Christi Wynn should 
provide leadership and experience for 
the team's newcomers, who include 
seven freshmen. The starters for the 
squad arc: Ashley Jenkins, Lisa 
Kimbrell, Chrisii Wynn, Dec Dee 
Williams, Jenniter Smith, and Kristy 
Tarallo. 

Captain Lisa Kimbrell commented 
on the team's play, saying. "We have a 
long way to go, but we're improving 
every game. As the season progresses, 
so will our team's level ol play." 

Ihe Lady Blue Hose played at USC- 
Spartanburg on September 16 and host 
Francis Marion on September 2? 



GENE'S CAFE 



GOOD 
HOME 
COOKING 




MON.-FRI.: Sam - 2pm 

SATJam • lOam 
207 W. PITTS ST. 



ENVIRONMENT 



10 



I-RIDAY.SEPTHMIU-K IS. IW2 



The Presidency and the Environment 



by Kristina Pruitt 

STAFF WRITER 

There arc many factors that inllii- 
ence a voter's decision. An issue of major 
impormncc in the 1992 clcciion is the envi- 
ronment. Both presidential candidates have 
different ideas about how far the govern- 
ment should go to ensure a sale and healthy 



environment; however, both agree that some 
measures must be t:ikcn. 

Obviously, the environment fac- 
tored into Clinton's decision tochoo.se Gore 
ashisrunning mate. Gore is one of Congress' 
foremost experts on the environment. Most 
environmental grt)ups feel Clinton has ihe 
most active hand on the environment. 

Bush claims to be "the environ- 



BUSH/ 
OUAYLE 



mental President", but he has concerns 
about the economy and lack of jobs, lie 
feels that during ttiis tune of high uncmpkn 
ment and recession. increa.sed regulation on 
industries will result in fewer jobs and add to 
the unemployment rate. 

The following is a compatisDii ol 
some oftheenvironmenial views hold bv the 
1992 Presidential candidates. 



CLINTON/ 



GORE 



* Plans to lower taxes for the oil and gas 
industry and producers. 

* Supports plans for drilling in the Alaskan 
Nauonal Wildlife Refuge. 

* Does not support aulo- 
efficicncy laws. 

* The National Energy 
Strategy (NES) ap- 
proved Bush's plan to 
increa.se the 
number of nuclear 
power plants. 

* 199() Clean Air Act 
was weakened by the 
Council of Competitive- 
ness headed by Vice- 
President Quaylc. 

* He forced EPA to end 
a proposal for I(x;al gov- 
ernments to be required 
to recycle 25% of solid 
waste in areas that had 
incinerators; thiscaused 
an increase in incinera- 
tion. 

* Bush's redefinition of 
"wetlands" caused the 
campaign pledge "no net 
loss of wetlands" lo 
mean basically nothing; 
now halfofilie wetlands 
in the United States have 
no protection. 

* Energy and fuel 
as eihanol will be researched. 

* Opposed attempts lo weaken acid ram con- 
trol law. 

* Doubled EPA's (Environmentiil Protection 
Agency) enforcement budget. 




alternatives such 



* Suggests auto-efficiency law ot 4."S miles 
per gallon. 

* Support.s research of aliernaiuc luel and 
renewable resources. 

* Suppx)rLs carbon dioxide enussions tests 

* Supports plans 
to ban offshore 
drilling. 

* Proposes man- 
datory recycling 
ofaperceniiigeol 
recyclable prod 
ucls. 

* Proposes re 
bates lor I uel ef- 
ficient cars that 
would Iv paid lor 
by a tax on 
"gas gu/zlers". 

* Achieved 
tougheranti-i>)l- 
lutionlawsin Ar 
kansasm 1991. 

* Clinton backs 
the poultry in 
dustry, which 
I>olluies the nv 
ers badly; 
however, in 

1988 he devel- 
oped Clean Wa- 
ter Regulations 
* Seeks both protection for 

ancient forests and protection for the work 

ers. 

* Supports the l'''M) ('loan Air Ai I 

* Supports a lax on carbon. 

* Supports a decrease in the use ot nuclear 
power. 



MEMHERS OF 

THE PC 

RECYCLINCJ 

BOARD 

Heather Moncrief, Re^ vde PC 
Chairperson 

Todd l,()\e, Recycle PC Secretar> 
Margaret HarHeid, SEE Reprosonta- 

Quill Bynum, PrcsKleni ol Men's 
C\)uncil 

SIu'IIn Carson. President ol Woiiien's 
CouiiL il 

lU'iijanun .loiu-s. 11 (' Represeniatiu' 

Mr. Skip /ubrod, \ P ol [■maiii.e 

.Mr. .lack KobtTtson. Director ol the 
Phvsieal Plant 

Dr. .Itrry Slice, laeult\ Representa- 
tive 

Mrs. Charloitf ^liic M.ill K.jm .. i, 
Uilive 

Sliidt-nl Pick I p Men n Council 

meiiibers, Women's Couiieil memhers. 

and SEE memkrs. 

Any questions concerning tlie program 
can be directed to any ol the board mem- 
bers. Anyone interested in volunteering 
hisorher lime in assisting with the weekly 
pick up IS encouraged tv) call Heather 
Moncrief at 8CV9.S1.S. I'ositions on the 
board are available for the 92 9;^ schtx)! 
year; contact Heather at the above num- 
ber if interested. Ifioso interested in 
joining Students lor Environmental 
Education should contact liill Wriv'hi at 
ext,8()88. (SEf, meets on Wednesda\ sat 

■^iOOpm. Rich;irdsoii Hall, ri)om ''0/ i 

Rl.CYCl.P. P( encourages evcrvone lo 
recvcle their soda cans, plasiie coniam- 
ers. cardh)aid boxes, newspa[>er and led 
ger pa[vr Bins can Iv found iii die 
dormitories .ind auulemie tniihliii'N 



Bush weakens F^ndan^ered Species Act and threatens existence of old growth forests 



by led Carmithael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

Ihe 19-year-oId Endangered Sjx-cies 
Act is one of the nation's most pt)werlul 
pieces of environmental legislation. Spe- 
cies arc listed as endangered based upon 
biological considerations; economic lac 
tors arc weighed in as a "recovery plan" for 
the crucial spccic^ is established. Only the 
Endangered Species Committee, which is 
appointed by the President, has the power to 
exempt a listed endangered species from 



protection if the economic coii.sei|uences 
are Um) great. 

President Bush is presenily Ciimpaign 
ing agiansi this act, sjKxilically as n relates 
to the old-growth li)rests of the Northwest. 
C)nly approximately .S percent of these an- 
cient forests- forests that were in exisience 
[irior to colom/aiion remain today. Esti- 
mates vary, but it is clear that these forests 
will be gone m as lew as "S years if Bush 
succeeds in overiurnmg this legislation. 

The limber industry is fighting for the 
rights to continue cutting down ilu-.e for 



csLs. The [)iobleiii centers arounil their be 
mg the only habitat tor the spotted owl, as 
well as other less [lublici/ed eiulangercd 
species. These mhabiiantshclpioest;iblish 
the lorests [losiiioii under the Enilangered 
Species All In s|veches given at iv«,o 
sawmills diis [last \veek. Bush displayed his 
support lor the workers ami his lack ol 
sup[)on lor the lorests and endangeretl spe 
cies. Bush IS trying lo protect the jobs ol tlie 
loggers iind sawmill workers, but has no 
agenda for what will ha[)|K"ii when the lot 
esis are complelelv desiroved When the 



lorests are gone, the jobs anil the eiulan 
gered species will K- gone also: iherelore, 
the )obs which are being proieeied are not 
long-lasting [Xjsiiions 

The logging ol the old gioAih ioiesiN is 
iioiesMniial 1 heamountol loresictiiandm 
America has reniameilconstant over the last 
hundred years (aNiul f)(H) million acres), 
an(l:ieeorilingio/-,»r/)('\niaga/me(Se|>l 14, 
ill the wood America needs uin be 
grown on aUnit hall the land nou used lor 
limlvr. Such ligures do not inelude the old 
iTowlli forests 



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One of thes( 
expense you c 

.NKitii ( ,iit»liiui \atJ«Huil kiHiNKs Ui.ll akiii^ uiUi ( olk'ij' conn's 
a kK of iKS't'NSirN e\|)j'iis«'s But i lKskin« .mcihiiU sei-XKv 
« h.ii^H's shoiildii'l N' <»n<' of lliem 

ITkils wti\ we've dvaUtl our liirKain ( :iKK'kin« VroiiiU 
It tjves sliKkiits a clKtkiHy iKVoiml with all Uk' eMras — 
wiUioiil a munUilN s<'i\i(C(tiar^Hv 

Hk'iv's imi lliiiil U) tlH- iiuiiiU'r of ( Ik-* ks y(Hi can ^nie 
s«> NtHi (an »!*• ><Hir Kiiwim CIhi kirui Vroiinl to (kin all ut 
UMM-ssj'iilials shown alHive 

XtKl liirwiin ClKX kliK4 c^»^M^ with an VIM caixl Uwl \(HI 
« an use fiit- at over KiO loui tiMatir IVinkii^ Iih .itioiis all 



over SouUi («jn)lin«i Iik IihIiik.; tlfos*- at (Hir beaeh*"s fRiat 
(an R'allv (onK' in Iwiikh iliiniu; s{)nii« Itn-.ik ) hus, \(hi can 
iis<' the ( anl in lhon,s.iiMls of Kela\ and Cirrus niachim-s 
.!( hiss Uh' I'lHintn 

^Tial s m(«', (Hil> S(^N offers Hex Kfspotise — a special 
tekt)fMtn«' siTNid' \\\&\. k1.s >ihi cM for \<Hir Ixutk hakwH'*' and 
traiis.« lions anyllme - fnt' of ( hai>j«' 

Baffin Che^ kiiitj frxMii SouUi («ir>*iw ViUoniil (Hie 
esM-ntial a 'olle^e A^^ M.i;\R\NRlNCr 
siuden should ^g gouth Carolina National 

iH'MT do without ^^r *,„«„, t. 



e IIWI .*•!« ( Jin*M SMnu Hmil 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1992 



12 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Peter Segal to perform CEP concert 



by Kim Kahon 

STAFF WR TIER 

Peter Segal, a distinguished guiuirist 
and soloist, will be performing a program 
entitled "The Spanish Guitar from the Old 
World to the New" in Edmunds Hall on 
September 21 ai 8: 1 3 pm. 

Segal has studied under such masters 
as Alirio Diaz, Oscar Ghiglia, and Jose 
Tomas at the Accadcmia Chigiana and 
Spain's University of Santiago. He holds a 
Master's Degree in Musicology and cur- 
rently teaches at both Temple University, 
where he is completing his doctoral stud- 
ies, and at the Philadelphia University ol 
the Arts. 

Segal has played in almost every state 
m the union, including Alaska. In 1974, he 
made his successful European debut in 
London, and in 1983 he made an equally 
acclaimed New York debut. Recently, he 
performed in recitals in both Spam and 
Hong Kong. 

Segal will be playing an arrangement 
of Spanish and South American songs. He 
will premiere a piece entitled ".Man with a 
Blue Guitar." The work, ba.sed on the 
poetry of Wallace Stevens, is composed by 



Robert Capanna. 

Jerry Biebeshiemer, PC's Cultural 
Events Coordinator, is looking forward to 
Segal's performance. 

"This IS the first time I've been to a 
concert since I arrived at K'. I'm anxious 



to .see the turnout of students, as well as 
listen to the acoustics in l-dmunds," he 
says. 

September i."S through October 15 is 
Hispanic Heritage .Month. Show your in- 
terest in another culture and enjoy. 




Peter Segal will be performing on September 21 in Kdmunds Hall. 



Jlle photo 



Fried Green Tomatoes to be shown in Springs 



by Tonya Snead 

STAFFWRITI-R 

Rumbling in the distance, rails creak 
and leaves swirl as the train passes through 
the small, dusty town of Whistle Stop, Ala- 



grow up to become best friends, sharing 
everything from the grief and sorrow of 
death to adventures I ike those of RobinlKxxl. 
T'his is the .setting for the hit movie Fried 
Green TomatCKis, which plays tonight m 
Springs Campus Center. 



bama. In Whistle Stop, two young women The two characters, Idgy l'hreadg(XKle 




and Ruth Jameson, played by Mary Stuart 
Mastcrsonand Mary -Louise Parker res[xx 
lively, complement ciich other perfectly. 
While Idgy is a somewhat wild and untiimed 
tomboy, Ruth is just the opposite, a young 
lady always doing the "right thing," acting 
the "right way," and even marrying the 
"right man " 

Ihe narrator. Ninny (Jessica Tandy), IS 
a nursing home resident who befriends 
Evelyn (Kathy Bates) a confu.sed, highly 
self-conscious, middle aged house wife. 
Alter l^velyn is rudely dismissed by her"not 
so deiir" Aunt Vesta, she finds herself passing 
the (line listening to the adventures ol Ruth 
and Idgy. During the following weekly 
visits, Ninny tells her stories of humor and 
tradgedy to a very eager listener. These 
visits deal not only with ihe friendship ol 
Idgy and Ruth, but also with the difficulties 
1 velyii IS having controlling her weight, her 
marriage, and the "inability to grasp her 
lemimnity" 

Slowly, Iwclynlx-'gins to make changes 
III her lifestyle, giving up some of the "Ruth" 
characteristics and adopting some of the 
IKrsonality of Idgy's character. 

Fried Green lumatcK'sisan mtelligeni, 
heart warming film that islK-autifully writ 
ten and su()erbly acted. In my opinion, iJie 
entire cast shines. 

You can catch a [xvk at the film your 
self tonight at 7 (K) pm in Springs Campus 
Center. Ihe lilin is Ix-mg s|X)iisored by the 
Student Union Board and will be free ol 
charge. 



Campus and Clubs 

B vt U M\\ hK\ \\ 

Bet;t Ben Beta welcomes the new 
officers for the 1992-93 sch(K)l yeiir and 
l(X)ks forward to a pnxluclive year. The 
new officers include: Lara Collier, 
President; Lciv Tackle, Vice President; 
Jessica McCuIlough, Secretary; Melanie 
Kimbrell, Treasurer; and Heather 
Moncrief, Historian. The officers and 
members welcome and congratulate the 
new members on tlieir achievement. New 
members include: Ashlee Benjamin, Chris 
Coker, Leigh Cummings, Kimberlee 
Gibson, Jessica McCuIlough, Heather 
Moncrief, KimberlyStancil, and Shannon 
Trammell. Beta Beta Beta is the biologi- 
cal honor society on campus. 

MM 

The SiKieiy for the Advancement ol 
Management will hold its orgiini/aiional 
meeting Monday, September 21, at 7:0() 
pm, in Chapman Conference Center, 
Jacobs Hall. Any student of anv vear and 
any major is invited to attend 
Westminister IVllowship 



WF wants to welcome all of the first 
year students to PC and to welcome every- 
one else back as.well! WF is tlie group on 
campus which is affiliated with First Pres- 
byterian Church here in Clinton, and we 
also have many other denominations rep- 
resented every semester! We welcome 
everyone lo our meetings on Tuesday 
nights at 9:CK) pm in Crossroads. Come 
and join us because we would love lo have 
you. 
Omicron De lta Kaopa 



Ihe Presbyteruui College chapter of 
Omicmn Delta Kappa is plea.scd H) an- 
nounce thai ihe following seniors were 
inducted inio the organization: Celeste 
Bowers, LaraCollier, David Dixon, Craig 
Gilstrap, Jennifer Gordon, Brad Hawley, 
Lx;Je;uma Maddo.x, Michael M;utin, Irank 
McKay, Malorie McRae, Aaron Miller, 
Heather Mtmcncf.CynihiaSeeliger, Laura 
Smith, Kailiryn S[H.\irman, Chris Wmgard. 
Chnsti Wynn. Omicron LX'lt;i Kappa is 
the National leadership lU>nor Society 
for ci)llege students that recogm/es and 
encourages su[X'rior scholarshif), leader- 
ship, and exemplary character Con- 
gratulations to these new memlvrs for 
their achievements 



1 he Brothers and Pledges uf Kappa 
Alpha Oriler welcome all upperclassmen 
back iocam[>us. A sjxcial welcome g(X'S 
out to the freshmen. We hofx' that your 
year is oil to a ginnl st;iri and will Ix the 
beginning ol a great four years. Please 
feci free lo come by the house anytime 
We have some great parties lined up this 
semester, and we hope you will Iv a part of 
them, llianks to all ol you who made last 
weekend lun. We will have many more 
c(H)kouts, guiLirisLs, aiul band parlies for 
those of you who could not make it lo last 
weekend's lestiviues. G(hkI luck lo the 
((Mtibiill team this weekend vs I'urman 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVII Numlx-r 2 



"dive the people the lif;ht, so they may find the way." 

PRESR^TF.KIAN COLLEGE Clinton, South Carolina 2^325 



Fridav. October 9, 1992 



Dean Thompson selected as SC's Professor of the Year 



Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RKLATIONS 

Dr. Harold Dean Thompson, assisiani 
prolcssorol English ai Presbyterian College, 
has been namal the \^)2 Professor of the 
Year for South Carolina by the Council for 
the Advancement and Support of Education 
(CASE). He was selected for the award 
from ten nominees from nine different col- 
leges and uni versiues in South Carolina. Dr. 
Thomson is the second member of the PC 
English department to claim ilie honor in as 
niany years, as professor of English Dr. 
James Skinner received the award in 1991 . 
"All t(X) often, the ego of the professor 
becomes a blinding sun against which the 
self-esteem of the student evaporates into 
airy nothingness," Dr. Thompson said. "1 
don't want to use my .scholarship as adub to 
beat my students into unquestioning sub- 
mission; 1 want them to go beyond anything 
1 may say, to ask questions again and again, 
as together we explore the grand tradition of 
thought with which the present is to keep 
continuity. Understanding the purposes of 
our lives IS my first priority." 

A native of Spartanburg, SC, the }}■ 
yciir-old professor joined the Presbyterian 
College faculty in 19X8. He was a Sparuin 
Mills Scholar at Woflord College, where he 
received his BA in English. He c;irned his 
MA from the University of Soutli Carolina, 
and his PhD from Vanderbilt University in 
1987. 

During his four years at PC, Dr. 




Dr. Harold Dtan 1 hompson lectures to his Kngiish 1 1 1 tias.s. Thompson was recently 
selected as the St)uth Carolina Professor of the Year. photo by Kun Gibson 



Thompson has developed a reputation as a 
disciplinarian who cares as much about the 
personal success of his students as their 
professional success. 

"Inuring a lecture in the winter months, 
1 have often seen him suddenly disappear 
from the classriK)m and reappear with a 
ste;imingcup ot hot tea topjK'd with lemon 
which he would give to a student suffenng 



from a terrible cough. He would ll^n as 
quickly proceed with his lecture," said Gene 
Brooks of Clinton, a 1992graduate. "Hehas 
urged me always to push my hori/on wider. 
One characteristic question comes from his 
lips to nearly every student he meets, includ- 
ing me: "What IS your dream, boy? If you 
could lay aside all hindrances, what would 
be your dream? You must dream. Without 



a dream, you have no starling point Boy, 
dream big." 

Robert Thomas. Jr., a junior from Co- 
lumbia, has also been touched by Dr. 
Thompson - his former advisor. 

"As his advisee, I was subject to in- 
tensely personal discussion on not only 
academics, but also family, friends, and the 
actions which define me as a person. He 
seemed to know all about me," he said. "I 
will never forget receiving my first test back 
in saond semester English. The comment 
was short and simple: 'Good. Thai's my 
boy. Now, what is this sixty-someihing in 
physics'!*" 1 honesUy do not believe 1 did 
anything my freshman year which escaped 
his hearing." 

And, as the students prepare to gradu- 
ate. Dr. Thompson also has a good idea 
about the quality of the person who has 
passed through his midsi 

"If my students leave my classes with 
improved writing skills, well and good. If 
they leave with an increased passion for 
reading, great! What I hc^ is that they 
come to care about the things that make life 
worth living, raeivc joy from the curiosity 
that pushes our horizons onward, arwl be 
determined to make a difference for some- 
one - whether that difference be through 
smoothing a brow furrowed w ith pain, edu 
catmg the unlearned, or giving direction ana 
purpose to the ccxifuscd and stumbling," he 
said. 



Public Safety considering 24- hour security for female dorms 



On The Inside 



Page 3 . . . 

Senior Audit: Who is respon- 
sible - the Registrar or you? 

Bob Beckel to visit PC campus. 

Page 4 . . . 

Joe Nixon relives his fraternity 
days at PC. 

Page 11... 

PCs llomccuiiiiiig Court. 



by Tobin Turner 

STAf I WRITER 

If PC's Chief of Security Grey 
Mason gets his way, women stu- 
dents on campus may be using a 24 
hour security access system to get 
into ihcir dorms. 

Mayson has proposed this new 
system to help in providing a safe 
and secure campus. "I reali/e that I 
am dropping a bomb by recom 
mending this propi)sal because many 
students find this policy unpopu- 
lar," he said. "However, I must 
ernphasi/e the impv)riance of slaying 
ahead ol the game ' 

Already this year two rapes have 
occurred in residence halls in Char 
lotte. North Carolina, and Mayson 
wonders if it is not just a matter of 
lime before PC adds its name to the 
list of schools that have had violent 
crimes commuted on campus. 



Some female residents sec a 
round-the-clock security system as 
more of a hassle than a boost to 
campus safety. 

"One of the reasons 1 chose PC 
was because of the small, contained 
campus and the sense of security," 
said Shelley Phipps. "I don't see a 
need for the doors to he locked 24 
hours a day." 

Another PC student suggests that 
safely is the responsibility of the 
individual. "If you're worried about 
security, lock your door," said 
Heather Jones 

At present, each female resident 
hall IS equipped with a card access 
system The doors lock aulomati- 
i^ally ai 12:00 am. and a resident 
musi use her card to gain entry after 
ihai time Hi)wevcr. ihc doors of 
ihe lemale dorms arc unlocked from 
7 ()() am until midnight. 

There is a concern among some 
female residents that using a 24 - 



hour security system in the dorms 
would result in some women leav- 
ing the dorm without their card or 
losing ihc card altogether. 

The decision to implement a 24 
hour security system for female 
residents will fall on the desk of 
Andy Alii/er. director of residence 
life. Alti/er says that decision is 
not one he will relish making. 

"I agree withChicf Mayson that 
we need to be proactive and always 
think of the safety of our students," 
Altizer said. "On the other hand, I 
believe the policies need the support 
of the student body." 

"In my opinion, the subject 
needs to be addressed by the 
Women's Council and female resi- 
dents. 1 hope the female residents 
choose to keep the hall locked dur- 
ing the evening hours, but again, it 
should be their decision," added 
Altizer. 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1992 



One person can still make a difference 



by Jason West 
EDITOR-IN-CHEF 

When you are a college student, 
summer vacation is the time when 
you find a good part-time job, make 
a little money, and relax. 

This past summer was anything 
but relaxmg for me. Instead of get- 
ting a job as a counselor at a camp or 
waiting on tables in a restaurant, 1 
decided to run for public office. 

After returning from campus last 
semester, I began to throw around 
the idea of running for a seat on the 
Kershaw County School Board. I 
was not very happy with the way 
things were going in my county's 
school district, and I thought it was 
time for something different. I 
thought it was time for some "new 
blood," and I believed that a student 
would have a better understanding of 
the school system than any career 
politician. 

I discussed with my parents and 
friends the idea of running for office. 
None of them were too encouraging. 
In fact, some of my fnends thought I 
was crazy, and they thought that 
electing someone who wasn't even 
20 years old to a seat on the school 
board would be a mistake. 

Needless to say, I didn't take 
their advice. I sincerely believed 
that I could make a difference and 
that my youth was a plus, not a handi- 



cap. After a great deal of soul search- promised this lady that I would never 
ing, I made my announcement and lorget, and I hope that 1 never do. 
started my campaign. 



I thoroughly enjoyed campaign- 
ing. Every day, i went from one 
house to another, telling anyone who 
would listen who 1 was and what I 



On August 25, 1992, the voters of 
Kershaw County saw fit to elect me 
to the school board. On that same 
day, the voters of Kershaw County 



wanted to do. My travels led me to alsoelected another young person to 
meet tKe board, 

some in- y^ ->. as an 18 

jfe^ple ("Don't think about what the office | (Ic'frJ^h^ 

and some can do for vour personal gain, think man named 

interest- u * u\ i t- *u Wesley 

ing ani about what you can do for the llcrndoh 

mals. (1 office and the people." became the 

was V^ J youngest 

chased by elected of- 

three or ficial in 
four dogs and barely escaped being 
bitten.) 

I will always remember one ladv 
1 met in particular. She was an elcl- 
erly woman who lived alone. After 

inviting me into her house, she pro- alcoholics, or TV zombies. 1'he vast 

ceeded to tell me her entire life story, majority are willing to help make the 

This lady was a tremendous story- world a Ix'tter place. Young people, 

teller, and 1 enjoyed her company. suchasRyan White, alongtinie AIDS 

Before I left her house, she told me victim and victim's rights advcxate; 

there was something she wanted me Kim Zmcskal, a 16-year-old athlete 

to alwaj/s remember. "If you get who represented the llnted States at 

elected, 'she said,"don't think about the Olympics; and (\)iTieten Boom, 

what the office can do for your per- who was only a teenager w hen she 

sonal gain; think about what you can faced persecution for defending the 

do for the office and the people." 1 rights of her fellow human k-ings, 



South Carolina. 

Herndon is one of many youth 
who has proven that young people 
have something to offer. Ttie youth 
of Amenca are not all druu heads. 



are all excellent examples of youth 
making a difference. 

However, you need only to look 
across the PC campus to find young 
people who are contributing to so- 
ciety. People such as Laura Smith, 
who serves as the intern for the SVS 
program; Frank McKav, who bright- 
ens the lives of many elderly people; 
or former PC student Mary Ellen 
Vernon lloyt, who started the 
Laurens County Habitat for Human- 
ity Chapter, are great assets to the 
coninninity. 

I ran t\)r the schcx)! board be- 
cause 1 lx."lieved that a young person 
could make a difference. I still be- 
lieve that! This nation's greatest 
resource is not oil or gas - it is youth. 

This NovenitxT, the youth of this 
nation can make a difference by vot- 
ing. The e.Kperis tell us that the group 
of people who voles the least in this 
nation is the youth. The experts 
belive that young people are slack, 
unconcerned, and incapable. You and 
I l^oih know that is not true. 

I urge all t)f you to be involved, 
infoniied, and interested. I believe 
that we, as young people.could do a 
much iK'tler job running the Con- 
gress, the stale legislatures, and the 
school lx)ards ot this nation than 
those vt ho currently find themselves 
in power. 




The Blue wSlocking stalT encourages 
Students to express their concerns by 
writing letters to the editor. The 
next deadline for submitting letters 
to the editor is October 23, 1992. 



The Blue Stocking of Presbylerian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVII, Number 2 
October 9, 1992 



Editor in-Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

Sports Editor Evcrcite Calls 

Entertainmenl Editor Camisha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather Moncrief 

Photography Editor Kim Gibson 

Layout Fxiitor Angela Richardson 



Advertising Editor Ann Mayticid 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Mixon 

Artist Michael Chnsicn.sen 

PhrMoi^raphy Staff 
Kimberlec Gibson Todd LA)ve 



Staff Writers 
Eli/.abeth Cunard 
Leigh Hcarnburg 
Kristina Pruitt 
Paula Wancn 
Brian Sacco 
Kim Kabon 
Tobin Turner 



Amanda Bowers 
Katherinc Bonner 
Cher Fulbright 
Michelle Canley 
Shelly Phipps 
Jainey Pate 
Tonia Snead 



The Blue Slot king is a biweekly student publi 
cationof PresbytcrianC'ollege Thepa|vr serves 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional ami 
national concern For advertising, contact The 
RlmSt(>clunf{, Presbyterian College, Box 1061, 
Clinton, SC l^M^ I he Itlue Stochn^ wel 
comes letters to the edilor froin all niemk-rs of 
the PC community. Signatures arc required. 
Lencrsare prinicdon a'*|iacc available bias The 
BliieSt(Mkm^ reserves the right to win all letters 
for popcr graiiuiiiu and punctuation The Imal 
deadline for submitting letters is Friday at I2;(X) 
pmon the week before publnaiion 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1992 



NEWS 



Students express dissatisfaction with Registrar's office over senior audit 



by Shelk-y Phipps 
STAFF WRITER 

Asarccjuircmcnt for graduation, all 
PC seniors mu.st mcci with the Regis- 
trar 10 complete a senior audit. Yci PC 
studcni.s say ihey arc surprised lo find 
out what the audit involves, and many 
claim ihey were never infomied of such 
a requircmcnL 

The senior audit policy began years 
ago as a double-checking procedure to 
confirm that all rei^uircmenis for 
graduation would be completed by the 
anticipated graduation date. 

Assistant Registrar Flo rX)wdlesays 
that, ulcaily, the audit sliould be com- 
pleted during the spnng of the student's 
junior year to avoid last-minulc panic 
in adding required courses. 

"Tlie Registrar's Office is only a 
clearinghouse," explained Dowdle. 
"The students are exfx?cied to take some 
of the responsibility to keep up with 
their records and requirements." 



Senior Ellen Mercer says she is 
glad she kept a record of her coursework 
at PC "The Registrar's Office didn't 
have any of the classes I took last fall in 
their records, but they had one class that 
I've never taken. I had to correct the 
record s . 

myself. As 
I under- 
stood It, 
complet- 
ing the se- 
nior audit 
was the 
Registrar's 
job, not 

mine, "said 

Mercer. 

Mercer was not the only senior w ho 
expressed dissatisfaction with the audit 
process. Kern Pynne discovered dur- 
ing her audit that she must lake a class 



"As I understood it, completing the 
senior audit was the Registrar's job, 
not mine." 



next spring that has not been offered at 
PC in over five years. She was able to 
exercise a policy waiver option. 

During the audit, seniors are sur- 
prised to learn that they must pay a $25 
diploma fee which covers the cost of 

— the di- 
ploma, its 
simulated 
leather 
cover, and 
cap and 
gown 
rental. 



Ellen Mercer 

Scon Rice 
finds the 

policy ab- 
surd. "After four years of hard work to 
achieve senior status, a $25 fee stands 
between the student and graduation," 
he said. 



Rice points out that all students 
receive the PaCSaC every year, which 
is paid for in iheir student activities 
fees. "Why isn't the diploma fee taken 
from the same account?" asked Rice. 

Dowdle explained that PC does not 
charge ilie student for the diploma fee 
with tuition costs because the school 
would have to distribute refunds to all 
students who transfer to other schools. 
"PC serves as the middle man between 
the student and the company who 
charges the fee," she added. 

For students who arc working to- 
wards a double degree, the fee is in- 
creased to $40. 

"You'd think that afterpaying over 
$50,000 we 'd get our degrees for free," 
commented Senior Ted Carmichael. 

Dowdle advises students to com- 
plete their major cards early and to pay 
the audit fee as soon as possible. 



Beckel to present 'democratic perspective' on election 



Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Dunng the opening program in 
Presbylcnan College's "I-lection '92 
Series," political analyst David Cicrgen 
painted Bill Clinton as the lavonte to 
win the presidential election in No- 
vember 

On I'uesday, UciolKr 13, lonner 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State 
Hob Beckel will add his views when 
he covers 'I*hc 1992 Fvlections: A 
IX'mocralic Persfxxnive" in Belk Au- 
ditorium at 1 1 :(M) am 

Beckel is the moderator on F-ox 
Television's weekly public affairs 
program "Off the Record," a guest 
host for CNN s "Cnjssfire" and "Larry 
King Live, " and is serving as {X)litical 
ana I y st and co mmentator for "CBS 



This Morning" dunng the 1^W2 cam- 
paign, In addition to writing a syndi- 
cated col unm for The Los A njiieles Times , 
he has appeared on television news 
shows on each o\' the major networks, 
and IS a frequent guest on such shows as 
'Face the Nation," "Meet the Press," 
and "Nighiline" 

After a political baptism in Roben 
Kennedy's 1%H campaign, a lour of 
duty in the Peace Corps, and a successful 
sunt heading uphisown consulting fimi, 
Beckel joined the government in 1977. 
As the youngest IX'puty Assistant Sec- 
rctary of State in history, he steered tlie 
controversial Panama Canal Treaties 
thn)ugh Ctmgress. He moved into the 
White House as head of an Administra- 
tion effort to press Congress into pass- 
ing the Mideast and Salt II Treaties. 



Beckel returned to his career as a 
political consultant for a shon time, 
then was asked by Walter Mondale to 
manage the candidate's 1^H4 presi- 
dential campaign. As national cam- 
paign manager, Beckel oversaw 
Mondale 's successful race for the 
rX'niocratic nomination. 

In 1985, Beckel formed National 
Strategies and Marketing Group, Inc, 
a consulting firm speciali/mg in 
grassriKilscampaigas for some of this 
country's leading corporations, trade 
asstKiations. and non-pa)fit organi- 
zations. In 1989, he also formed BB A, 
Inc., a political analysis company 
which monitors trends and develop- 
ing issues in American politics for its 
clients. 




MTTER 



The Campaign to Improve Child Care in South Carolina 

When selecting a child care fadfity, make sure H offers each of the lido^^ 

G Frequent warm tntetactions between adults and cMdren. 

J Nutrittous meals anchor snacks. 
J A variety of learning activities appropriate to children sage& 

J Enough adults to respond to the indtviducdchUd. 
J Stable group of qxoaUy trataied teachos. 

J A healthy and safe environment for chfldren 

J A poHcy that welcomes parents to drc^ in unannounced anytime 

ij An atmosphere that lets kids l)e kkk 



To find out more, call i'800-763ABCD 



Homecoming 
events slated 
for weekend 



Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The prcscniaiion of the top alumni 
awards will highlight Presbyterian College 
Homecoming activities October 9 through 
1 1 , as hundreds of alumni are expected for 
the wcciicnd activities which will include 
class reunions, a barbeque lunch, a golf 
tournament, and the crowning of the Home- 
coming queen dunng halftime of the PC 
football team's game agaiast Catawba. 

Three alumni awards will be presented 
on CX;tobcr 10 during the PC Alumni Asso- 
ciauon program scheduled lor 1:00 pm in 
Edmunds Hall. Those to be honored are Dr. 
Edward Walter Burlcc. Jr. (Cla.ss of '47) of 
Bnstol. Tcnne.sce; Elwcxxl Gray Lassitcr III 
(Class of '6^) of Norcross, Georgia; and Dr. 
Jonathan Robert Davis (Class of '76) of 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Presbyterian College's Homecoming 
Weekend will bcginonOctober9 at Laiccside 
Country Club with a golf toumamcni spon 
sored by the Walter Johnson Scotsman Club 

Later that evening, students will present 
skits and entertainment for alumni and 
friends during the annual Blue Sox Festival 
Blue Sox will get underway at 7:00 pm at 
Bclk Auditorium In addition. Holiday Inn, 
Darlington House, and the Inn on the Square 
will host special class reunion dinners 

Saturday's schedule includes dcpari- 
menial reunions, a picnic lunch, the alumni 
assix laiion program, the fcxMball game, and 
additional class reunion dinners A special 
Sunday brunch is planned at 9:(K) am on 
October 1 1 . with wwship services to follow 



FEATURES 



FRIDAY. OCTOBER 9, 1992 



What a difference a house makes. . . . 

A glance at fraternity history 




photo courtesy of Tom Siallworih 

This 1970 Alpha Sigma Phi picture was taken next to the old 
Judd Dining Hail building that stood in between Richardson and 
Neville. This building burned down in December 1973. 



by Christie Grant 
STAFF WRITER 

Imagine being a siudeni ai Presbyterian 
College in the early 196()s. At that umc, the 
campus was a different place altogether, 
with different buildings and different faces. 

Greenville Dining Hall (GDH) was not 
in existence in the '60s; instead, Judd Build- 
ing was the dining facility and it was l(Katcd 
bchmd Neville Hall. Thomason Library had 
not yet been constructed, so Smith Admin- 
istration Building served as the campus li- 
brary. In addition, there was a 3(X) scat 
audi tonum in the back of Neville Hall, where 
the language labs are presently l(x:ated. 

This was the way Presbyterian College 
was when Jcx; Nixon began his college ca- 
reer here. Nixon currenly serves as Dean of 
Students. 

In addition to the dinmg hall and library 
being located in different places, K' frater- 
nities had no court in which to meet. In 
stead, fraternities met randomly m Neville 
Hall, the dining hall, and in maintenance 
shops. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, and 
Alpha Sigma Phi met on the third ll(K)r ol 
Neville. Kappa Alpha met at the mainte- 



nance facility, which was located behind the 
Judd Building Sigma Nu met m liic house 
that is presently located behind (JUll on 5th 
Avenue. Theia Chi had a .second lloor .set of 
rooms in the building legated between 
Ramage's Texaco and McDonalds. 

According to Nixon, who was a Pi 
Kappa Alpha, ilie lack tjfan olTicial Iralor- 
nity court did not prevent Irat parlies. "We 
u.sed to rent the Legion Hut and had musical 
groups like ilie 'Hot Nuts' [icrrorm. We 
would also have record parties at our meet- 
ing locations," said Nixon. 

During Nixon's student years at PC, 
less than 50 women attended the college. 
"Needless to say, we did a lot of road \iip 
ping," he said. 

Nixon also added that when his Irater 
nity met in Neville Hall, he didn't have use 
of an elevator. "There was no elevator in 
Neville back then, so we had toclimb woalen 
steps to get to the third ll(K)r," he said. 

In the IW)()'s more than 50 percent ol 
the men on campus were involved Iraler 
nally. Ibday, 44 percent ol PC males are 
Geeks. 

PC's Fraternity Court is only as old as 
mosi of the present students. The court was 
completed in 1971 lor a price ol S22(),(KX), 
with SIX houses on seven acres. 




Lilllc Known Fact 

PC became residcntially cocducaiional in 1965 with the construc- 
tion of Clinton Dorni. Before then all uoineti siiuients were coinnnilers. 



The unwritten rules of Preshvterian College 



by Dennie Lynn Hill 

STAFTWRlTliR 

As the freshmen gel settled inio their 
new homes in the metropolis olClmion and 
the upix-rclassmen return, we begin lo no 
tice, once again, the riiuals ol PC siudenis. 

I am sure that everyone has caughi on to 
the acts, which some may classify as hi 
/.arre; nevertheless, they iu-e palierns that 
define us as Presbyterian College studenis 
We can idenufy an "import" right awa> by 
merely watching or conversing with them 
for only a few moments. Some of the rituals, 
such as carrying a purse, are. of course, dead 
give-aways. Never, never, ever carry a 
purse. I think there is some cruel act such as 
cutting off a female student's arm il she is 
caughi. Or even worse, you might be mis 
taken for a Converse girl, Non siudents 
may al.so commit another dreadlul e rime on 
campus. llisoverkx)kedby some .of course, 
but there is a huge seating chart caiegori/ed 
by campus orgam/aiions at the entrance lo 
CjDH You don't make the misiake twae ol 
silling ai .someone else's table. Other things 
thai classify non-students and K' students 
include rules about eating Roberts, lor 
example, is not a last IikkI, drive in type ol 
restaurant. To us it is a line ealingesiahlish 
ment much like the Graystone. And lor the 
best te^ in the southeast, you don't go home 
to mom, you go lo Whiielord's. Mom 
doesn't have shaved ice. Other things in 
elude our obsession with driving to class 
(even if it is quicker lo walk) and, of course, 
gossip. Gossip, gossip, gossi[), and more 
gossip. You know die underground gossip 
magazine that is |)roduce<l on campus thai 
re|X)rLs anything and everyUiing that you 

wouldn't want someone toknowalH)ui your- 
scin It is my understanding ihai even the 
administrators rctcivc a copy. K' students 
know everything there is to know about 
other iKople's lives, ineludmg iheir most 



embarrassing moments. You know, those 
niomenis that no one lets you live down. 
Like when you slip in the cafeteria and spill 
allol your loodoiiihe lirsidav ol .schiK)l.or 
when you dance and sing on siage with a 
band on Friday night and you can't go inlo 
(il)lUvcauseol a humiliation senienceol at 
least one week. Aiuh)h,how youappreciaic 
your Iriends lor not diu ing ii into the grouiul. 
Ills not lorgoiten, but talked about at every 
meal lor days, wevks, or even years. For 
example, die lirsi nighiof my freshman year 
still rings in my head as one of the most 
embarrassing momeni.sof my life. My friend 
Ami and I had Iven mviied loan up[X'rclass- 
nian parly the first night ol our freshman 
year We had connections, you see: her 
sister \\as .i senior Well, we were excited 
Ix-ytuul words We primjx'd. went to our 
lOH meeting,, iiul then oHio the first party 
111 our eoijege career We w ere tH)ih nervous 
and excited, but we had been inviied. every 
thing vsould be line Then, suddenly. ouiol 
iiuvvheie.i voice s,ml. Wait a second'" VVe 
had been sH)pped by an up|K'rclassman as 
we were walking inio the jKiriy He then 
prcKceded to pull on the lop comer ol my 
Nhin and say. Aicii i you going lo Uike ihis 
I'll'*" I turned to Ann and, with knees 
kniK king ami tears in my eyes, I told her the 
lauil news "Ami, we have lo take oil our 
shins to go 111 What are we going lo do'.'" 
The upperclassman broke in and said. "No, 
Ireshnum. you have on your FOB nameuig " 
Well, lo and iKhold, lliere I sUK)d, a Uue 
undeniable Ireshman wiihmy I OB nameuig 
•md all II yoii are thinking lo yourscH, 
'Gosh, I bet she did want lo die ol enibar- 
Kissineni." you hii die nail on the bead. 

There :u-e many Uadiiions al PC, and 
most ol them won't be found written atx)ui 
Ml the sclnH)lcaUilogueorihe knapsack But 
as we all know, some of us Iik) well, these 
ideas ,111(1 nlu •!>- • "f imls do exisi 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1992 



FEATURES 



Dr. Thompson: 'On test day, he is an Atilla' r^ a • u ^a^^a ,„^.^o ^. i^co 

^ -^ . Good news in one hundred words or less 



by Martha Lynn Smith 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Chalk up two for Presbyterian College. 

As the 1992 South Carolina Professor 
of the Year, Dr. Dean Thompson, assistant 
professor of English, is the second PC fac- 
ulty member in as many years to be given 
that honor by the Council for the Advance- 
ment and Support of Education (CASE). 

This is no joke, although the recipient is 
one of the most famous comedians on cam 
pus. 

Dr.Thompson's visage isa familiar one 
on campus; who else would hold an 8 o' 
cl(Kk class on the Neville Hall front steps in 
sub-zero temperatures? But he is glad to 
interrupt his lecture to go gel a hot cup of 
lemon tea for a coughing student. And his 
students love him for ii. 

Is he a lough teacher? Ask his students 
and listen lo them moan. He revels in his 
nicknames, or in his eyes, accolades: "Dr. 
Death" and "DDT." He isn't trying lo be 
mean; he just wants his studenis to reach 
their potential and to a.'ali/e the beauty of the 
wrilien word. 

Thompson is inspired by Whitman, 
moved by Wheadey, enlightened by Donne, 
amused by Chaucer, appalled by \\)C, and 
daily pays homage to the genius ol F" it/gerald 
and Welly. 

"Don't you see what this passage 
means," he says as he leaches, leaping and 
flying among the group hovering on the 
Neville front steps, llie siudents :u^e taken m 
by his enthusiasm and drenched with the 
knowledge spilling forth. 

"UK)k, there's nothing sjKeial atH)ui 
me," Thompson growls alx)ul the award 
"I'm privileged to leach alongside the Holy 
Trimly of Prater, Skinner and Stew;ui, I love 
to teach and I love my students. It's that 




Dr. Dean Thompson phou, by suvt Owtns 

Gene Br(K)ks, a 1992 PC graduate and 
a Thompson protegee, described Thomp- 
son in grand metaphorical style: "On test 
day, he is an Atilla; . . , in spirit, a Mahalia 
Jackson; . . . al a dream, a deCrevoccKur; . , 
. in charily, a Teresa; ... in easy-going 
attitude, a Hank Snow . . , ; as a genUeman, 
a veriLible Lee." 

But Tbompson is humble. He says, 
"I'd love U) know what put me over the lop. 
The committee must have seen the Elvis 
calendar." 

Only Dr. Thompson wi)uld dress up as 
Elvis, complete wiih sideburns and 
bcllboiioms, and pose for last year's SUB 
calendar 

Il seems only liuing to conclude a TtH)mp- 
son article with a joke. 

The girl potato said to the mother po- 
tato, "I'm in love with Dan Rather" 

"You can't be," the moUier |:x)iato re- 
plied. "He's only a common later," 

I)r Dean Thompson, CASE South 
Carolina professor of the year, is no "com- 
mon later," 




by Alicia Perry 



Every Monday, a group of about five 
PC students and I head out to Laurens Me- 
morial Home in the legendary SVS van. We 
usually .stay for about an hour. Although an 
hour IS not an extraordinary amount of lime. 
It makes a world of difference in ihe lives of 
the residents as well as the volunteers. When 
the residents see us walk through the front 
door, their eyes light up and smiles cover 
their faces. Whether we have planned a 
game of bingo or a song and dance, the 
residents are just happy that we are there. 
Before we leave, Ms. Hedgepath usually 
fills us in on all the gossip, and Ms. Wallace 
leads us in a song or two. The volunteers are 
supposed to be the ones to enrich the resi- 
dents' lives, but we usually manage to break 
even. 









Springs Canteen at night 



Take-out pizza on Mondays and Thursdays: 



Regular canteen menu on 
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 





Habitat: 'Helping build simple, decent housing with God's people in need' 



by Martha Lvnn Smith 
FEATURliS EDHXJR 

1 he epitome ol 'l)uiii \ iv iimis 
Ser\imus" 

On Sunday of last week, die Presby leriaii 
College I labiuil for Humanity chapter and the 
1 4iurens County I lahiUit allil late chapter held 
a ground breaking for Uie first Habitat lor 
Humaniiy hou.se m Laurens Couniy. 

The recipient family, u mother and her 
two young childaMi, wea* very apprecialive, 
and stwn tliey will move into die house dial 
was specially designed for diem. 

"Helping to build simple decent housing 
with CkkI's jx'ople in ntvd" is the national 
mono lor HabiUU for Humamly; and that is 
jusl wlul llic.sc two chapters arc doing lor this 
family. 

"There Is room for everyone in 
America." 

!sihcrc?Thut'showJ,HccU)rSi.Juhiidc 
Crevecoeur, a Frenchman who settled as an 
American farmer, descriK-il the American 
Da'am, in his 1782 ess4iy, icnvrs from an 



Anwnrun Farmer ^'f^^* literally on every comer. 

"Welcome to my siioies. d.suessed Lu ^^^% my study there last semester, I 

ropc-an , , , " be w rote, "I will eive thee fields encountered about twenty homeless people 



to Iced and 
clothe thee, a 
comfortable 
fireside losii by 
and tell thy 
children by 
whiii means 
lliou hast pros 
pered, and a 
decent bed to 
retxise on," 

Two bun 
dred and ten 
years later, 
what has be 
come ol the 

A m c r 1 c a n "<^^ bless you." 

^lr^v^„ » That was the kicker, There were so many; il 

Washington DC. the nalion'scapiUil, is ^^^ hard lo do .something every lime, 
second only to New York in the number of There wercal.soalewofwhaimylricnds 

homeless pi-ople, Thea*, the homeless sleep andlcalled.usingahomblepun,"ihcaMdeni 
on the US Capiud steps, in from ol the While homeless," These were the people tfiai we 
House.inlrom of every government building, P'^^^'d every day as we went aboul our busi 




each day. and I be 
came accustomed 
10 being asked lor 
moiK'y at least dial 
many times. 

"A little help, 
please ma'am." 

"No, I'm. sorry, mM 
UKkiy" 

'"Hiank you, any- 
way. God bless 
vou." 



ness. There was the womiin ai dxr metro si(^ 
who cussed and shouted horrible diings at 
people w ho wouldn't give her money. There 
was another man who did acaibiJiic flips for 
people as they walked by, And there was 
Charles Tyler Cavcnaugh. 

He lived nghi on the comer near my 
dorm Hchadalittlciablcandachair.andhc 
kept all of his KMongings right Uiere with him. 
He made a liitle fire to keep himself warm and 
10 ctx)k himself a meal of flour and water. On 
Sumlays, as chureh bells rang all aa)und him, 
he read his Bible. "He used to be a pncst," a 
friend of mine lold me. But now he is home- 
less, and every day he greeted me with a 
tot)diless grin. 

"There is room for everybody in 
America" 

Habitat li>r HumiUiity is wivkmg lo real- 
ize dial gtxil as much as it can. The chapter 
hould K' praised for its cfforiv 

K"s chapter has work Ul|'^ acpioxi 
maiely every Saturday on ago- when- ycxi -can 
Nisis. Anyone wishing to be a part of PC's 
Habitat chapter should contact chapter jvesi- 
dimi l.eJeanna Maddoii at 8H47 



Mi 



ENVIRONMENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBHk 9, 1992 



iRir)AY,0CT0BF:R9, 1992 



POLITICS 



Environmental products to be made available 



by Heather Moncrief 
ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 



An environmenial "general store" 
is on the horizon for Greenwood, S.C. 
Bob Coleman, a native of Greenwood, 
is behind the plan. Coleman wishes to 
offer alternatives to the prominent 
nonbiodegradable and nonrecyclable 
products that arc produced by compa- 
nies who do not care about protecting 
the environment. 

Choosing the items to be sold is the 
difficult task and continues to require 
much research. Coleman plans for all 
of the items as well as their producers 
to be both environmentally sound and 
health conscious. He is looking for 
companies that do not test on animals, 
do not pollute as a result of their manu- 
facturing process, and do care about 
protecting the environment. Products 
produced by companies that also pro- 
duce components for nuclear weapons 
for the defense mdustry will not be 
carried by the store. 

Coleman wishes to make shopping 
in his store an educational process. 
"Consumers must learn to differentiate 
between companies and products," 
Coleman said. "It is each individual's 
responsibility to learn the effects of the 
products he or she is purchasing." If a 
product is carried by his store, he wants 
his shoppers to know why. Tentative 
plans are to have some form of expla- 
nation for each item visible in the store 
explaining why an environmentally 
conscious consumer should purchase 
it. The information will be there; people 



will just have to take the lime to read it. 
Coleman, an ex officio member of 
Greenwood's Solid Waste Advisory 
Council, is taking part in rescdrching 
ways to reduce the amount of waste 
being landfilled. He hopes that through 
the Council's efforts and better public 
education, reduction will rise above the 
Council's initially set goal of 25% re- 
duction. Greenwood is currently 
spending approximately 5.5 million 
dollars tobuilda new landfill; ihissum 
is higher than 

that being 

spent on po- 
lice protec- 
tion or parks 
and recre- 
ation. "Indi- 
viduals can 
no longer 
look at 

throwing 
things away 
as costless. It 
is very ex- 
pensive, 



"If you're not 

buying recycled 

products, you're 

not recycling." 



of Basic H equals 6900 bottles of 
Windex or 270 bottles of Fantastic. 
He realizes that all of the coniainers he 
.sells will noi be recycled, but at least 
there will befewerof iheseiobc placed 
into the landfill when they are emptied. 
Coleman thinks very strongly that "II 
you're not buying recycled prcnlucis, 
you're not recycling.' 

While his goal is to have ihc sioro 
open in the spring, he may have a small 
version open prior to Christmas. The 

project ro 

mains in iis 

p I a 11 11 I 11 i\ 
stages an tl 
wil! doll 
nitclv he 
small scale at 
first. He has 
chosen some 
of the Items 
which he 
plans It) 
carry. These 
include such 



items as bio- 

Coleman explained. "Individuals and degradable, organic cleaning products; 
communities not recycling are throw- water filters; 100% recycled paper 
ing money and the future away." products including toilet paper, paper 

The percentage of wastes kept out towels, and Christmas cards and wrap 



plans include a possible cafe and the 
sell of such products as solar panels. 
"Companies will not make environmen- 
tally sound products until people slop 
buying those that arc not environmen- 
tally sound. Economics is the deter- 
mining factor," said Coleman. He 
hope that his store and others like it 
will assist in creating the needed de- 
mand lor such Earth friendly goods. 

If there is an interest on the part of 
faculty, stall, and/or students, Mr. 
Coleman has offered to come to Pres- 
byterian College to display his prod- 
ucts and to explain why he believes 
them to he onvironmcnially sound. A 
hind raising [irojcci involving the sell 
ot a cleaning kit is also available 
through him at this time. Any indi- 
viduals and organizations who are in- 
terested in cither of these should con- 
tact Hcaiher Moncrief ai 833-9515 as 
sDon as possible. .Such items as 
lighthulhs, books, recycled paper 
products, and Shaklee cleaning prod- 
ucts arc currently available; if inter- 
ested m ordering or in learning more 
about what is available, call either 
Heather at ihe above number or Mr. 
Bob Coleman at 803-229-3336. 



of this new landfill will determine its 
lifespan. Coleman believes stronger 
efforts should be made to extend this 
lifespan so funds will not have to be 
used in the near future to replace it. He 
is playing his role in this effort by 



ping paper printed with soy ink; cloth- 
ing made from organically grown cot- 
ton; environmental books and t'shiris; 
vegetarian cookbooks; and aliernaiive 
CDs. ecoWorks lighibulbs which are 
manufactured in South Carolina and 



offering consumers products which are advertised as lasting three times 

contain less packaging. For example, longer than regular incandescent bulbs 

Shaklee products which he carries arc and using icn percent less energy will 

highly concentrated; a one-quart boltle also be available. Future large-scale 




Ufa 



The Emerald Earth 
Trading GMiipany; 



=0X2 



...<.«....<■ 



Envitonmentaliy lUspoiuiUt Pmiucu Fm Our Futuit 



ram Omec Bon 791 

Cncmrood. South CMofaa t964« 



BabCoiraua 



Trash in space? 



by Heather Moncrief 

ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 

Trash problems exist not only on 
the Earth but also in space. An estima- 
tion made by the U.S. Office of Tech- 
nology Assessment reveals that as much 
as 900,000 pounds of manmade debris 
at a diameter of 4 inches, as well as 
much more smaller debris, is presently 
in orbit around the Earth. Nol only 
does the debris pose an environmental 
problem; it also endangers the lives of 
astronauts and hinders the success of 
their missions. In fact, in 1983 the 
space shuttle Challenger received ex 
tensive damage to a cockpit window 
when a very small chip of paini from a 
previous mission struck it. As unbe 
lievable as that may sound, one must 



realize thai when a piece of debris as 
small as one-half inch in diameter trav- 
eling at 22,000 miles per hour collides 
with something it carries with it the 
impact of a 440-pound safe traveling at 
60 miles per hour on Earth's surface. 
Predictions made by scientists re- 
veal thai the proposed U.S. sjMce sta- 
tion would be at a 36-percent risk of 
suffering a critical collision with de- 
bris within the first ten years of ils 
operation. The funds may be found to 
build the station but nol to conlinu 
ously repair it The problem is serious; 
yet any attempts lo solve it have been 
lew in number While the U.S. Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences has been 
asked lo study the dilemma, few 
policymakers are responding l(» this 
newly publici/ed problem 




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Political analyst David Gergen speaks on the election 




pHoto by Kim Gibson 
David (Bergen spoke at the September 22 CEP In Belk Amilorium. 



hv Ted Caraichael 

IXJl.rilCS EDITOR 

The first insiallmeni of the Russell 
l*rogram election special was a huge suc- 
cess. David Gergan spoke in Belk Audiio- 
rium on Tuesday, giving a republican \kt- 
sjKMive of ihc ujKoming presidential elcx- 
lion. Many suiik^nLs have since conrwBenied 
on what a gtxxl sfvaker he was, and st)me 
viid that this was one of the besi CEP^s they 
have ever seen A lew fvople, however, 
criiici/ed his view as being non-pofusan, 
rather ihan "A Repuhl ican Persivclivc." and 
fell thai a should have been billed as such. 
Nevertheless. Mr. Ccrgcii made somcgiKxl 
lH)ints about government, the economy, and 
ol course Ihc presidential race Hoc are 
some excerpts. 



Preskienl Bush. Gergan has known 
George Bush Icm over 20 years and has a 
very high regard for him as a person. Ac- 
cording to Gergen, Bush sees the presidency 
as a kind of stewardship, a managerial ap 
proach to governmcni He is not there with 
sei goals or a purpv>se, but deals with things 
as ihey come up. "He's not a very concep- 
tual or philosophical person, but rather de 
fines life through people. When someone 
talksabouthousing.hcthinksof Jack Kemp; 
if ihey mention France, he thinks ol 
Miiterand." Healsohasan uncanny memory 
for names and writes 30 to 40 notes per day 
to people with w horn he works. Gergen was 
impressed with Bush when he spent a week- 
end with him in 1979. "George Bush and his 
wife both drove out lo the air^xiri to pick me 
up, instead of jusi sending a college kid or 



something." When he had lo gel up at 5:30 
in the morning to catch his flight. Bush was 
at his door widi a cup of coffee and said, "I 
thought you might need this to gel started." 
Gergen did express disappointment with 
Bush's first term, saying how he had walked 
away from Reagan's ideals. "In politics 
there's an old expression— 'You always 
dance wiih the girl that brung you.' Bui 
when Bush i(x)k office, the Reagan people 
were shoved out the door and forgotten." 

Jim Baker. The current Secretary of 
State has been fnends with Bush for years. 
They have what Gergen calls "the most 
unique relationship in the twentieth cen- 
lury" between a president and his advisor. 
Gergen described Baker as an extremely 
honest man who has incd to keep his record 
clean. He got his experience in foreign 
affairs at Bush's urging. Bush himself got 
his foreign affairs experience dirough the 
encouragement of former president Richard 
Nix(m, and he considers the experience in- 
valuable. While Bush acts more like a 
manager. Baker is more goal -oriented. He 
recogni/es ansd ignores what cannot be 
done, then focuses only on the obtainable 
goals. "You always know where you stand 
after talking lo Jim Baker." What the Re- 
publicans need lo do is get Baker's name 
substituted for Quayle's in the press "so it 
would be Bush/Baker versus Clinton/Gore. 
Then they could make the argument. We 
spent tfie last four years fixing the world; the 
next four will be spent fixing the country.'" 
The Campaign. "In most elections, each 
side sians off with about 40% of the elector- 
ate and IS fighting for the last 20%." But this 
year will be an "uphill battle" fw George 
Bush. "This morning Clinton was 2 1 points 
ahead, and Bush hasn't broken 42% m a 
national poll yet." Gergen goes on to ex- 
plain that in modem campaigns, strategists 
look at a map of the US and ask "how can we 
gel 270 electoral votes?" In rcceni elec 
tions, the republicans could count on the 
Souili and California, which gave ihem a 
base of about 200 eleclorial votes. But this 
year California is decidedly on the 
IX^mixTai's side and the South is shaky, 
whichgivesBushamuchsniallerba.se. This 
makes the heartland crucial for the Republi- 
cans. Gergen compares winning enough of 
those st^^s to "drawing an inside straight— 



Radio PC 



^'irl 



PC's radio station moves on campus this year 
Broadcasting will begin at 3:00 pni on October 
21 on the VC inforniatic^n channel (32) 



you can do it, but its hard." 
Governor Clinton. "Bill Clinton is very 
smart — very well read." He reads about 300 
books a year, according to Gergen, and has 
been good on both education and welfare 
reform." He also has "a commitment that is 
very deep and finn on bnnging the races 
together." But Gergen is unsure what kind 
ofpresideniClinionwouldbe. "Hehasgonc 
around telling people what ihey want to 
hear, (but) is he willing to take the heat to be 
a good president''" He also expressed a 
desire for Clinton to take a stand on an issue, 
"to show thai he can say no." 

In this election. Bush knows he will lose 
on his record from an economic standpoint; 
therefore, he needs to "change the subject. 
[Bush will) turn our alicnuon to the ques- 
tion , Can we u-ust Clinton to be president'' ' " 
He will also concentrate on the drafi issue 
and will try to plant seeds of doubi about 
Clinton's record in Arkansasand the rumors 
of his infidelity. 

In Closing. "Whoever wins this elec- 
tion, the most imponani ihing is that the 
people stay in the arena. [The citizens j must 
be willing and able to make changes and to 
make sacnfices and to make this a better 
country. Weoweiltothenexigenerauon." 
Gergan went on to say thai he believes there 
is now a growing spint in the American 
people, "and a desire to pull together and 
solve the problems regardless of race, reli- 
gion, or political ideas." His final note was 
a quote from Winston Churchill; "You can 
always count on America to do the nght 
thing, after she has exhausted al I of her other 
opuons." 




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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1992 



FRIDAY, 0CT0f3ER 9. 1992 



Men's soccer team continues to dominate its opponents 



by Brian Sacco 
STAFF WRITER 

After shutting out their first three op- 
ponents, the Blue Hose soccer team con- 
tinued their domination as they rolled to 
victories against Limestone. USC-Aikcn, 
Carson Newman, Mars Hill, and Wofford, 
with their only loss coming against NCAA 
Division One power Clemson. 

Coach Ralph Poison attributes a greal 
deal of the team's success to the group's 
willingness to work together. "The team's 
work ethic has made it fun," he said. 

The soccer team travelled to Limestone 
on September 14, coming away with a 5-0 
victory in a game in which every player saw 
action. Will Lindstrom began the sconng 
with an assist from Robert Gcxling. Dan 
Walbolt followed with an assist from 
Shannon Brown; and then John Mairs, as- 
sisted by freshman Tyler Boulwarc, added 
the third goal. Boulwarc added his own goal 
with an assist from Todd Chandler, and 
fellow freshman Chris Napior closed out the 
scoring with an assist from Rob Clarke. 

The Blue Hose team returned home two 
days later to face USC-Aikcn. The Blue 
Hose dominated the game, as eight different 
players scored and the entire team played. 
Napior and Chris Bruno each had two goals 
while Jason Woodall had two assists. 

In their second SAC game of the season, 
PC travelled to Carson Newman and pulled 
out a 3-1 victory in double ovenimc. On a 
field described as a "mudbath" by Coach 
Poison, the game remained scoreless for 
over an hour until Carson Newman scored to 
lead 1-0. PC lied the game on a Will 



LindsU"om gcxil, assisted by Coding and 
Walbolt. 

After one .scoreless overtime peritxl, 
Napior scored with seven minutes remain- 
ing in the final ovcrumc on an assist from 
Woodall. Bruno secured the win when he 
scored on a penally kick. 

On September 23. PC travelled to 
Clemson University where, after playing an 
even first half, the Hose tc<im fell .S-O. The 
Blue Hose held the Tigers to one goal in the 
first half, but in the second half the home 
team turned up die intensity and scored four 
unanswered goals to put the game out of 
reach for PC. 

Twoday later, the soccerteam traveled 
to Mars Hill for their third SAC game of the 
season. PC recorded Uieir si.xih shutout of 
the season widi a 3-0 victory. Brown scored 
the first goal of the game widi an assist I roni 
Lind.strom and Napior. Woodall added a 
penalty kick goal and Nonnan De Waart 
was unassisted in the final score of the game. 

On the last day of Sepieniber, \*C hosted 
rival Wofford and pounded its way to a 6-2 
victory. The Terriers scored first, but die 
Blue Hose responded with four unanswered 
goals. Michael Martin scored first lor PC, 
followed by Boulware, assisted by Bruno; 
Brown, unassisted; and a second by 
Boulware, who was assisted by Lindstrom, 
De Waan, assisted by Walbolt and Napior, 
added die final score for PC. 

In the first half of the season, die Blue 
Hose have gone 8 and 1 overall and 3 and 
in die conference. Two events have high- 




PC's Chris Napior (#11) takes on a VVolTord defender. 



ph(}to by Kim Gibson 



lighted the team's success so far this year. 

Chris Napior was named SAC Player of 
the Week for September 14 ■ 20. and Coach 
Ralph Poison earned his l(X)di victory as 
Blue Hose scKCcr coach with the win over 
Carson Newman. 

When a.sked about die overall play of 
his team. Poison resfxinded, "I am excited 
about the balanced attack of our four front 



runners, and having our best orgam/ed 
nudlield ever h.is Kvn die key lo our sul- 
ccss." 

"I am pleased with die outstanding play 
of the defense, which hascompiled six shul- 
ouLs so far this sea.son," ackled Poison. 

The Blue Hose host SAC ()p|X)nent 
Catawaba at 1 2:(X) pm tomorrow. 



New assistants join football staff 



by Everett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

The Presbytenan College F(X)tballTeam 
has added three new assistant coaches to its 
staff. Following die departure of Kevin 
Catlett, Harold Nichols, and Chuck King, 
Head Coach John Perry acted quickly to find 
the best replacements. 

Filling in where Kevin Catlcil lefi is 
Reuben Mendo/.a, who coaches the defen 
sive line. Mendo/.a. a Crystal City, Texas 
native.playedoffensive line for Wayne State 
College m Nebraska. Graduating in 19HS, 
Mcndo/a was an NAIA All-American m 
bodihisjunior and senior years. He was also 
named to the Kodak All- America Team his 
.senior year. After graduation. Mendo/a 
moved on to die professional level, playing 
for die NFL's Green Bay Packers, Miami 
Dolphins, and Ph(x:nix Cardinals, l')86-88. ■ 
In die offseason, Mendo/a coached the of- 
fensive line and ran the Sirengdi and Con- 
ditioning Program at his Alma Mater until 
1989. He was subsequendy hired at USC, 
where he served for two years as die Suengih 
and ('ondiliomng Coach. 

RcplacingChuckKingasoffensiveline 
coach is Jack Yelion. who played tight end 
at The Citadel and Catawba until he gradu 
atcd in 1989. Yelton, originally from F-lo 
rcnce, hel{)cd coach the defensive line, H 



backs, and tight ends at Western Carolina 
University from 1989 through 1990. Yelton 
then moved on to coach the oNensive line- 
men and tight ends from 1991 through die 
spring of 1992. 

Replacing Harold Nichols is Richie 
Mallard, who coaches die running backs. A 
native of t)alton, Georgia, Mallard played 
kicker and punter for Lenoir Rhyne College 
and graduated in 1991. AlL-R Mallard was 
All-Conference his Iresnian yearaiid District 
26 High Jump Champion on the L-R Track 
Team. Afier coaching die light ends in 
199 1 , Mallard joined the PC F(K)ihal I coaches 
this past summer. 

Head Football Coach John Perry 
commented on his new addiuons, saying, 
'They offer a viu-ied background to our 
program to give us new ideas and a new 
pers[x;ciive." When asked about how die 
players have adjusted io the new coaches. 
Perry added, "The players have res[H)nde(l 
welltolheircommg. We're proud of them." 

Cally Gauli, PC Athletic Director, also 
commented on die new coaches, saying, "I 
think that diere's an exellent mixture ol 
youth and ex[X'rience. We're pleased to 
have them. I think thisex[)eriencc will show 
in the players." 



Intramural Football Standiniis 
through 9/30 



Division 1 
nK<l> 


3 


L 



IN 1 


2 





Bad Boy Bombers 
Bludgeon Few 
Bailey Half Holes 
Rising Phoenix 


2 

1 




1 
1 
3 
3 



Division II 


W 


L 


riKA 


3 





ex 


2 





BBB Tigers 


2 


1 


IN II 


1 


2 


Hair Club for f^en 





2 


KA 





3 



^ 



9 SPORTS 

Blue Hose football team wins two games in a row 



by Kverett Catts 
SPORTS EDITOR 

The 1992 PC Football Team is 2-2. 
following back-to-back wins over Lenoir 
Rhyne and Wofford. On September 26. die 
Blue Ho.se won their home opener against 
the Bears of Lenoir Rhyne, 14-S. The PC 
defense dominated, as Lenoir Rhyne, pre- 
viously ranked sevendi in die nauon in NAIA, 
was unable to score a single touchdown 
The Bears' only points came from two field 
goals and a safety. Two touchdowns were 
all that die Blue Ho.sc needed in a game 
which had out.standing performances by die 
special teams and defense. 

F^C's domination of the Lenoir Rhyne 
offense was quickly noticed by The Slate. 
Linebacker Antonio Merriwether and de- 
fensive tackle Lee Morgan were named Co 
Players of the Week for Defense. Morgan, 
who had 10 stops, was named Slate Defen- 
sive Player of die Week, while Merriwedier 
wasalso named Slate Freshnum of the Week, 

Although there were no Offensive 
Players of die Week from K', two PC players 
were announced as Special Teams Players 
of the Week. Ja.son Sellars. who plays on all 
sjKCial teams, had two tackles on kickolfs 
and another Slop on a punt. R(xineyLighisey, 
who had a blcKked field goal, was also 
named. 

Head Coach John Perry commented on 
PC's defense, saying. "We had a bend but 
don't break defense. We kept them backed 
up by field position." 

"Offensively, wc didn't move die ball 
widi the continuity we wanted, but we did 
move the ball into the end/one after getung 
it.", Coach Perry said. 



On a rainy October 3 night in 
Spartanbiu"g,die Blue Hose offense exploded 
for five touchdowns, en route lo a 4 1 -27 
victory over Wofford. Down 14-7 after the 
first quarter. PC scored 14 points of its own 
and held die Terriers scoreless in the second 
quarter. At hallume die Blue Hose were up 
21-14 and never looked back, scoring 20 
points in the second half. In the second and 
ihird quarters, PC amassed 24 unanswered 
[xiints. Wofford lost the ball three of the five 
umes they fumbled, and die Blue Hose scored 
after all diree turnovers. 

The PC squad had a balanced offensive 
attack, rushing for 1 87 yards and passing for 
195. Blue Hose errors were limited to nine 
fienaliies; PC had no turnovers whatsoever 

Offensively, tailback Mason Gordon 
rushed 19 times for 1.^.^ yards, scoring 
touchdownsof five and fouryards. Fullback 
Steve Gome had 1 5 rushes for 67 yards and 
four catches for 34 yards, giving him 101 
all-purpose yards. Gome, a freshman, had 
two 2 one-yaid touchdowns, one receiving 
and one rushing. Tight end Brad Jones was 
named Co-Player of the Week in offense, 
widi four catches for 83 yards. One of 
Jones' receptions was a touchdown for 17 
yards. Also announced Player of the Week 
for offense was John Bradley, a tackle who 
made many key bkxks which opened holes 
for the running backs and protected die 
quarterback on pai;ses. Quarterback Tim 
Davis was 12 for 22 in passing, with 161 
yards and two TD passes. 

On defense the Blue Hose had a total 
effort, wiih five players contributing six 
tackles or more. The leader was linebacker 




PC player John Dow rejoices in the Blue 

Kelly Andrcucci, who had 10 stops. Defen- 
sive backs Tyrone Phillips and Jeff Wilson 
were named Co-Players of die Week on 
Defense. Phillips, a sophomore, had eight 
tackles and defiected a pass. Wison, a 
senior, made si.x tackles. The defense held 
Wofford. who leads die nation in rushing 
offense, below their average. The Blue 
Hose defense also held Shaun Graves, one 
of \i)c nations top rushers m Division 11, to 
only 110 yards. 

On special teams PC had excellent ef- 
fort by both Chns Griffin and Alex Honon. 
Griffin, a sophomore, had numerous blocks 
which helped protect the jHint and field goal 
teams. Griffin was named Spaial Teams 



Hose victory over Lenoir-Rhyne. 

photo by Steve Owens 
Playerof die Week. Horton.a senior, kicked 
five extra points and two field goals which 
helped pui the game outof Wofford's reach. 

When asked about the defense's play, 
Perry said, "We slowed them down and did 
not give up die big play. We did an excellent 
job containing Graves." 

Coach Perry commented on the Blue 
Hose offense, saying, "When you're ca- 
pable ofmoving the ball you feel good. The 
defense put the offense m great field posi- 
tion. Wc did not make many mistakes. We 
had good balance between rushing and 
passing." 

The Blue Hose host Catawba tomcwTow 
in the 1992 Homecoming game. 



Wonicn's soccer 
ranked nationally 

by Kverette ( atts 

skmisi nnoR 

After eleven games die Presbyterian 
Women's SiKcer Team has moved to 
I()ih in the nauon m the NAI.A. The 
team's overall record now stands at 10- 1 . 
and dieir conference record is 5-0. 

The Lady Blue Ho.se defeated 
Caiawb.i 4-0 on September 29 and Mars 
Hill 6 Oon Sepiembcr 24. They sutlered 
their only loss to Mercer on September 26 
with a score of 3-1. 

Ihus far diis year, three women on 
die learn have been named Conference 
Player ol the Week. They include Chanty 
Bra/cal,ChristyFlack,and Missy Butler. 

Head Coach Brian Pureed says he is 
very pleased with his team's perfomiaiKO 
"Ihe new players have defmiiely helfKul 
this year, bui more than half of die credit 
lor the team's success goes to the upjvr 
classmen, " he said 

"The returning players have t;iken on 
leadership rolesand really picked uptheir 
level of play a notch." he ailded 

According to Purcell. Flack, Butler, 
and Katlecn Dowd are key players this 
year. "1 have ncu seen a belter player on 
any team they have played." he said 



Volleyball team wins Alabama-Huntsville tournament 



by Kverett Catts 

SR)KTS FDITOR 

Following a first-place showing in die 
AlabamaHunisville Tournament, the Lady 
Blue Hose Volleyball Team is 1^-4 (1-0 in 
SAC). In die tournament, ihe Lady Blue 
Hose had victories over Tus(,ulum, Missis- 
sippi University for Women, and Christian 
Brothers in (xxil play. In the semi-finals die 
squad defeated host Alabama Hunisville. 
K' was lournameni champion alter defeat- 
ing die Umversiiy of North Alabama in the 
finals. 

The I ady Blue Hose's only loss in the 
loumament came against Jacksonville State 
in p(X)l play. Senior Lisa Kimbrell was 
named Outstanding Player of ihe lounia 
ment for her performance Kimbrell was 
alsoannounced SAC Player ol the Week for 
September 21-26 

Two days after die lournameni, l\' 
hosied SAC-8 rival Wmgalc College Ihe 
Lidy Blue Hose won in three suaight games 
On September 2S die leam ileleaied Con 
verse. Twodays following that wm.K' beat 
frskine 

On (K lober 26 ihe IX' squad competed 
III the WoHord lnvitaiu»nal Alter K'ating 



bodi Wofford and Limestone, the Lady Blue 
Hose lost to Ekm. Junior DeefXx' Williams 
was named to the A II -Tournament Team 
and was SAC Player of the Week. 

Head Coach Bedi Couture commented 
on the lineup's recent shuftle and overall 
play, saying, "We've been really up and 
down. This past weekend gave us die con- 
fidence lo play belter We've made some 
changes to improve and gel the freshmen m. 
Them finally getung experience has made 
them comfortable. Kristy Tarallo is a leader 
among the freshmen, and Lon Suit and 
Joanna F-riclmgare playing well in the biick. 
Senior Ashley Jenkins is a quiet role player 
whom we need." 

Senior Co-Capiam Lisa Kimbrell 
commented on the team's level of play. 
saying, "Thelevelof play is great. There's 
always riKini hyi improvement, but it's com- 
ing together. They're (the freshmen) doing 
a giHxl job, doing what diey have to and 
handling pressure situations" 

I"he Lady Blue Hose played Wimioiu 
last night and host SAC fiv Gamer Webb 

on Monday. Octobiv 12 




Lori Suit (#12) spikes the ball against 
Krsk ine . photo by Km Gibson 



ENTERTAINMENT 



10 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1992 



11 



ENTERTAINMENT 



IKinAY,0( rOBliR9, 1992 



'Far and Away' to be shown in Springs 



by Katherine Bonner 

STAFF WRITER 

Green, rolling hills, breaihtaking blue 
skies and foamy waves breaking on the 
rocks siimulaic your vision as distinct Irish 
accents make your ears tingle. The Irish 
countryside is brought to life. No, this is not 
the Discovery Channel; this is one of the top 
movies of the summer of '92. 

"Far and Away" stars Tom Cruise as 
Joseph, the common tenant farmer deter- 
mined to have land of his own, and Nicole 
Kidman as the strong-willed Shannon, bent 
on leading her own life away from her 
family. 

Shannon saves Joseph from certain 
death, while he saves her from certain mar- 
riage to another. Running together to 
America to claim some free Oklahoma 
land, they encounter a few sights quite un- 
worthy of the Discovery Channel. 

Upon theirarrival in America, they find 
themselves U'apped without money or aplacc 



to live. Taking up a brothel in the slums of 
Boston, they find work, hisof the "glamour- 
ous" kind and hers of the "towly" kmd. 

Claim ing to be brother and sister, and at 
first fighting as such, they bailie the feelings 
they have for each other as Joseph prize- 
fights his way to the top. However, he 
doesn't quite make it there. Inihc confusion 
following his fall, he and Shannon become 
separated. At first thinking they've lost 
each other forever, they meciagain in Okla- 
homa and ride in the action-packed mara- 
thon for land, this lime on opposing teams. 
But will we be fooled yet again into believ- 
ing that love cannot conquer all? 

Dirator Ron Howard docs a marvelous 
job and manages to make the ending as 
breathtaking as the beginning, with the 
beautiful sceneryofAmericaand the soulful 
music of Enya. 

"Far and Away" will be shown by iJie 
Student Union Board in Springs Campus 
Center on October 23 at 7:00 pm. 



Kim Hill brings music to Columbia 



PRESS RKLKASK 

Christian recording artist, Kim Hill, will 
be in concert at the University of South 
Carolina campus Friday, October 16. 

Sponsored by the College Ministry at 
Shandon Baptist 
Church in Co- 
lumbia and the 
use Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, the 
outdoor concert 
will be held on 
Field A at USC. 

Hill's current 
album, "Brave 
Heart," delves 
into such topics as 
death and hypoc- 
risy, to hope and 
satisfaction. 
"You have to have 

a brave heart to live in our crazy 
world, "explains Hill. "But even the bravest 
of heart needs help sometimes, and that is 
what I have U^ied to address on this album." 

Hill is a familiar voice to the college 
students and has loured a number of cam- 
puses across the United States and Furofx;. 




"Going to Europe reminded mc ot die [H)w- 
erful impact sharing your lifcihrough music 
can have on people," said Hill. "It let me 
know that 1 really didn't havcio limit myself 
widi boundaries-geographical, musical or 
ideological. As long as the songs are real, 

honest and Iroin 
my heart, [Kopic 
will be touched." 
The concert 
will begin at 
8:0() pm, with 
gates opening at 
6:30 pm. Since 
the concert will 
beheld outside, 
sUidcnts are in- 
vited to bring a 
bbnkei or lawn 
chair to sit on. 
ThereisaS3.(X) 
suggested dona 
lion at tfic gate, and Pepsi and pi/za will be 
«)ld during the show. In ca.sc of ram, the 
concert will be located at the Bcwker f. 
Washington Auditoriuai at USC. 

For more in formaiio« about the Kim Hill 
a)ncert, call Shandoo Bapti.st Church at 
(803) 7W-()632. 



Military band strci Athens historic values 



by Camisha Clark 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

The drums sounded in Belk Auditorium 
on Tuesday, October 6 as the United States 
Air Force Heritage of AmericaConccn Band 
of the Air Combat Command (ACC) pre- 
sented a memorable evening of rousing 
marches, patriotic music traditional clas- 
sics, and contemporary selections. 

As an integral portion of the Ixciures and 
Fine Arts Series, this program allowed (i) 
professional musicians to entertain the 
Presbyterian College Community in a free 
concert. With regular performances in South 
Carolina. North Carolina, Virginia, Penn- 
sylvania, and Maryland as well as occa- 
sional performances in Florida, Oklahoma, 
Nevada, Texas, and West Virginia, this 



highly honored concert band has made cul- 
tural conuibuUons to iKiny other commu 
mties. Having an auiiencc t)f over one 
million people annually, this band was die 
first recipient of die Colonel Cicorge S. 
Howiu-d Citation of Musical Excellence for 
Military Bands, "having demonstrated par- 
ticularly significant high standards of ex- 
cellence in concert band pcrfomiance " It 
has rapidly become the standard by which 
many other military beads are judged. 

Conducted by UmuIcbwiI Colonel U)well 
E. Ciraham, the band playctl an inspiring 
variety, including sckxtions ln)rn "West 

Side Story, Ihe Balik Hymn of the Ke 

public," and an overalure to "Merry Wives 
(rf Windsor." 



ill Nave saved these 
kids from drouTimg, 



hut he's not 




a lifeguard. 



Verleeta Wooten fom\d 



several 



hut shes not 



an astronomer. 




% new stars, 



The^ 



se are 



teachers. But 



to the kids they reach 
they're heroes. 




1992 Homecoming Court of Presbyterian College 






BE A TEACHER. 
BE A HERO. 

Call l-800'45'TEACll 



Angle Akins 

Chester, South Carolina 
Sponsored by Alpha Delta Pi 



Shelley Eidson 

Monrtx\ (ieorgia 

Sponsored by Zeta Tau Alpha 



Krin Fox 

Anderson, South Carolina 
Sponsored by Pi Kappa Phi 



Rachel Marcum 

Greer. South Carolina 
Sponsored by FCA 




* Public S*rvic* o< 
r^\*l ThnPuMcMion 



RtKh for the Pomi 

Hi/ IV II 



I ■« nmrnt. m 



l.aura Meyers 

( olumbia. South Carolina 
S|X)nsored by Sigma Nu 



Amy Owen 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Sponsored by Kappa Alpha 



Mex Oxford 

Griffin, Gct)rgia 
Sponsored by Theta Chi 



Vfelynda Ray 

Thomasiville, Georgia 
Sponsorol by SUB 







(Jina Robinson 
VVinnslH)ro, St)uth Carolina 
S|K)nstned by Pi Kappa Alpha 



l.aura Smith 

York, South Carolina 
Sponst>red by SVS 



Leigh Stoke?) 

Kingsport, Tcnnescc 

Sponsored by 'Westminster Kelkmship 



Conchita WtMidrufr 

Kissimmcc, Florida 
Sponsor(xl by MSU 



phaios by Kim Gibaon 



ENTERTAINMENT 



12 



FRIDAY, OCTOHF.R 9, 1992 



Campus & Clubs 



Sigma Sigma Sigma 

The sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma 
would like 10 welcome our new pledges: 
Laurie Fleming, Kim Frampion, and Betsy 
Walgren. Congratulations to Perrin Powell 
who won our Freshman Fantasy! Thanks to 
Mason Maynard, Chip Hill, Jeff Kundrai, 
Kevin Lindlcr, and Jeremy Campbell for 
helping out with this fund raiser. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

We would like to congratulate the fol- 
lowing brothers for the 199 1 -92 school year 
awards and honors: Brothers of the Year - 
Brad Palmerand Warren Blanchard, Athlete 
of the Year - Justin Grow, Otis Award - Pat 
Shearer, Pledge of the Year - John Broadway, 

We received 10 new members into the 
Brotherhood earlier this yeur. They include: 
Jamie Smith, Lance Dauby, Ryan Brown, 
Brian Inman, John Broadway, Tommy 
Harney, Blake Sian.sell, Gary Smith, Ben 
Biggar, and Robbie Slargel 

We encourage everyone to come out 
and celebrate Homecoming on Saturday at 
the Pi Kappa Alpha house. Gcxxl luck to the 
Blue Hose football team against Catawba. 
Goat of the Week award goes to Gary Smith. 

Chaplain's Office 

The following is a list of days, times, 
and places where the campus religious or- 
ganizations meet: Canterbury Club (meets 
every Sunday, 6:(X) pm at All Saints Epis- 
copal Church), Bapusi Student Union (meets 
every Monday, 8:(X) pm at Douglas House), 
Westminster Fellowship (meets every 
Tuesday, 9:00 pm at Douglas Hou.se). 



Newman Club (meets every Wednesday, 
7:15 pm at Douglas House), Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes (mccLs every Wednes- 
day, 8:58 pm at Douglas House. 

Are you interested in Ministry or 
Graduate Theological Education? Contact 
the Chaplain's Office, ext. 8476 or come by 
for more information. 

Fi Kappa Hhi 

The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi would 
like to congratulate our two new pledges: 
Dallas Oleson and Bill 'WcKxly' Wright. 
We would also like to welcome all of our 
Fall ' 92 Rush Girls. Thanks to everyone 
who attended the Furman game. Welcome 
Alumni! Come out to the house al 9:00 pm 
and hear Simon Sc/, our Homecoiniiig 
band. 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

We would like to thank those who came 
out for Rush. Wc have five new plegdes. 
They arc Eric Robinson, Mike Weaver, Dove 
Arthur, Brad Williams,andGDH's Ray Bell. 
Congratulations Pledges' 

If you haven't seen our new furniture, 
we urge you to come on out to the house and 
lake a look. 

Alpha Delia Pi 

We would like to congratulate our new 
Alphas - Holly Vanover and Laura 
Heamburg. Wc are so proud of you! We 
would also like to thank KA for letting us 
use their house for our Bid Day parly, and 
we would like to thank Avery Che ves for her 
great planning for the party. 



PC tradition continues - ^ 

Blue Sox Festival set for tonight 



by Kli/ubcth C.'unard 

.STAFTWRITfiR 

Can you imagine a Homecom- 
ing that consisted of only a football 
game? 

Many years ago, Homecoming 
al PrcsbyicrianCollege was jusi thai 
- a one day event consisting of a few 
aciiviues planned for Saturday out- 
side of the Uadiuonal football game. 

"Up until 1974, Homecoming 
was a one day event," said Mary 
Ixhman, PC Alumni OITice secre- 
tary. "In 1975, the college added an 
alumni lennis loumament and a stu- 
dent concert to the homecoming 
lestiviies." 

"In 1976, Ben Hay Hammcl, 
the dirator of alumni and college 
relations, added the Blue Sox Festi- 
val to Homecoming acuviiies. Blue 
Sox consisted of performers from 
viirious campus organizations act 



ing out skits before their peers," 
added Ixhman. 

The Blue Sox uadition contin- 
ues tonight in Hclk Auditorium, be- 
ginning at 7:(K)pm. Performers this 
year include Alpha Delta Pi, Sigma 
Sigma Sigma, Zeia Tan Alpha, Pi 
Kappa Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigmu 
Nu, Alpha Signia Phi, and the Blue 
Hose Varsity Cheerleaders. In ad- 
dition. Jay Nicholson and Jay 
Whimey will perform a rap. PC 
Senior Frank McKay will emcee 
the show. 

Each of the ix'riormcrs will be 
judged, and the lop three will re 
ceivc pri/es of S l(X) for first place, 
$50 for second place, and $25 for 
third. Thisyciir'sthcrnc for the Blue 
Sox FesUval is "Hose Down the 
Indians!" 




Tom Del.uca will be returning to the PC campus on November 2. 



file phtUo 



Tom DeLuca reschedules PC show 

Performance date moved to November 2 



by Shelley Phipps 

STAFF WKirhR 

Mark your calendars now! Hypnotist 
Tom r^^Luca will nol be coming to K' on 
(kiobcr 21, Insiead.he will bring his show 
U> Belk Audilonum on Monday, November 
2, at 8:30 pin. 

"Unusual" may be the besi way to de- 
scribe Dcl.uca's performance. fX'Luca be- 
gins his show with a magic act, however, 
dial's nol the rca.son most fK'ople come to 
see hi 111 

DeLuca's presentation of hypnosis is 
ihc phenomenon thai draws ihc crowds and 
has twice earned hini die recogniiion as 
College Einicrtainer of Ihe Ycai 

Del.uca says hisone-of-a-kmd program 



is an exploration of die imagination "I get 
the volunieers to use '.heir imaginations in 
ways they never have before. The results 
vary from acting out childh(HKl laniasies to 
serving as an micr|)reicr for an alien," he 
said. 

Senior Eli/abeih Bryan volunteered to 
Ik' hypnoli/cd during lX*Luca'sjx;rformance 
al PC lasi year. She admits ihal ihougli she 
was skepiical, iX'l.uca's |H)wer ol sugges 
lion worked on her. The audience watched 
as memories of Bryan's childhixKl were 
brought to the surface • and the stage. 

Bryan remembers Uie night as if it were 
a dream. "I was awiu-e ol what was hap|KMi 
iiig, bill I was unable lo conirol what 1 was 
doing. He had total conirol" 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVII Number 3 



"Give the people the light, so they may find ^e way." 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clmton, South Carolina 29325 



Friday. October 30. 1992 



Old traditions raise new questions 



by Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 

Presbyterian College mandates two 
stipulations in order for a person to be a full - 
time voting professor. First, the college 
requires individuals to have a graduate de- 
gree in their particular field of study. Sec- 
ond, the college requires that the individual 
be a member of a Christian church. 

The first requiremcntiswidelyacccpted 
and used by most colleges and universities 
throughout the country. The second re- 
quirement, which has been embraced by 
many church -related colleges and universi- 
ties, has been questioned recently due to 
greater emphasis on academics rather than 
traditional religioas ideologies. 

Despite the fact that many institutioas 
have dropped the religion requu-ement, PC, 
by vote of the Board of Trustees, has chosen 
to only hire professors who are members of 
a Christian church. 

According to Dr. William Moncrief, 
vice president for academic affairs, the 
faculty religion requirement is based on the 
mission of the college, which states, "Pres- 
byterian College exists to provide an edu- 
cation in the arts and sciences within a 
distinctively Christian context" 

"Society is always in a state of evolv- 
ing," .says Moncrief. "Many years ago, the 
culture was based on religion and almost all 
our institutions of higher learning were 
church-related. The modem era has become 
more secularand, as a result.our institutions 
have become more secular." 

"Presbyterian Collgege has chosen to 
address a secular world while still maintain- 
ing a religious basis," adds Moncnef. 
Questions are beginning to appear among 
?C faculty members and staff as to whether 
the college should continue to enforce the 
religion requirement. It has been suggested 
by some that PC should baome more toler- 
ant and less discnminatory by allowing a 



professOTofanolher religion to teach. It has 
been suggested by others that PC stick to the 
foundation and identity that has allowed it to 
be both secular and Christian. 

According to Moncrief, before an ob- 
jective decision can be made concerning the 
religion re- 
quirement, one 
must first know 
the history and 
evolution of 
church-related 
colleges, and 
one must know 
what has hap- 
pened to other 
colleges who 
have rid thcm- 
selvesofihere- 
quutjmenL 

"There is 
no contradic- 
tion between 
liberal and reli- 
gious convic- 
tion. Christian- 
ity IS hberalism 
in acuon," says 
Moncrief. "It is 
not an accident 
that mcKt of the 
liberal ails col- 
leges in this 
country were 
founded by 
churches." 

Presbyterian Church-related colleges 
began appearing in the 19th Century due in 
part to Presbytenans being among the lead- 
ers in tlw nation's higher education. The 
goal of these colleges was to care for the 
spiritual side as well as the intellectual side 
of their students while training them with a 
positive, biased Christian view m all sub- 
jcxLs. The social regulations included pun- 
ishment fix alcohol and tobacco use. card 



playing, dancing, and profanity. The em- 
phasis was on rules and regulations guiding 
the students' behavior as opposed to allow- 
ing freedom of discretion as the secular 
universities were doing. 

As time moved on. an erosion of the 

religious 
ideas began 
totakepl^^. 
In 1943. the 
Presbyterian 
Church, 
along with 
the presi- 
dents of the 
affiliated 
colleges, de- 
cided to drop 
the require- 
ment of 
mandatory 
worship for 
students. In 
addition, 
faculty were 
allowed to 
teach with- 
out having to 
incorporate 
Christian 
ideas into 
their teach- 
ings. 




^?*S^- ^SS^-ri^. 






The window in the Chapel stands as a reminder of 
PC's church heritage. photo by Kun Gibson 



In the 

1950's . 
Christianity was fighting a losing battle on 
most campuses. College presidents and 
catalogues continued to insist on the Chris- 
tian nature of church-related schools, but 
their statejnents reflected more hope than 
reality. 

Robert McAfee Brown, a professor of 
theology at Union Seminary in New York, 
argiwd in 1958 that "unless a Christian col- 
lege has an open policy about hinng on the 



basis of academic qualifications rather than 
piety, then the school is neither Chri^ian 
not a college." 

EHiring the moral rev(dution and campus 
tiornoil of the 1960's, Presbyterian College 
virtually eliminated all behavioral regula- 
tions that set them apart from the other 
sc)mx>1s. Akohol.smc^dng, and dress code 
rules wo-e abolished by student and faculty 
{Holest 

In 1%3, the Presbyterian Church 
changed the guideUnes for faculty at its 
schools. Rather than requiring the faculty to 
be active members of an evangehcal Chris- 
tian church, the prof^sors must instead be 
dedicated to the college's declared institu- 
tional purposes. During the 1970's and 
' 80's . many colleges left the Church in order 
to keep up with secular colleges and univer- 
sities. 

By 1990, the presidents of the 69 Pres- 
byterian schools, which fcxm the associ^ion 
of Presbyterian Colleges and Univcraties, 
were indicating that the Presbyterian Qiurch 
could be close to losing its involvement in 
higher education. 

*Thc religion requirement at PC was 
put into place by the Board of Trustees in 
(x6a to maintam the college and chirch 
relationship," says Moncnef. "The Board 
fears that the college oxtld become more 
secular, and many members of the faculty 
and staff fear a religious ughienmg by the 
Board." 

"PC believes that encouraging the 
spiritual side of life is m important ingredi- 
ent in the education of students," ad(b 
MOTcrief. 

"It is the collet's responsibility ID pro- 
vide an education in a Christian context It 
is the college's r^ponsibility to protect the 
students against fund^Hnentalists who would 
favor dictating religious pol^y to PC wd to 
project the students against those who favor 
a totally secular institution," says Moncrief. 



Sigma Nu t-shirt criticized for use of stereotypes 



On The Inside 



Page 2 . . . 

The Blue Stockins Editorial 
Board endorses the candidacy 
of Bill Clinton. 



by Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 

The 1992 Homecoming t-shirt of 
Sigma Nu fraternity caused many people 
to take a second glance, cspaially some 
faculty members who were offended by 
the characters depicted on the back of the 
shirt. Many of the faculty claimed that 
they did rwt sec the humor in the shirt but 
insicikl saw only the negative stereotypes 
of PiS students and alumni. 

When the issue was brought to 
l*rcsidcnt Orr's attention, he responded, 
"I believe this was done in p(X)r taste and 
(Icx's not reflect the class thai PC has" 

Members of Sigma Nu were shcx ked at 



response to the shuts and believe that the 

,,(,,'il 1111 l^JDJAV;,-/ 

viw I] 




entire issue was blown out of proportion. 
The characters on the t-shirt, according to 



the fraternity , were simply aconglomer^xm 
of all the characters on various t-shirts 
designed and us^ throughout the last 
few years. 

The fraternity al«) cited that they 
basically mtentkd to copy the Student 
Union Board shirts which depict a 
football player with a hose wraf^jed 
around his lower body and that llrcy 
had no intention of creating offoisive 
controversy. 

Dean Nixon defended Sigma Nu 's right 
to print the t-shirt but also stated that 
he hoped "orpnt/alions would use 
thcu best judgnient to reflect a positive 

image of the group as well as PC." 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



Editorial 



Rebuttal 



It is time for a positive change Bush is the only candidate I trust 



** (Editor's Note: By a vote of 6 to 3. the Editorial Board of the Blue Stocking decided to 
endorse the candidacy of Bill Clinton.) 



On Novembw 3 of this year, we will be 
casting our ballots for the next president of 
the United States. We must decide who is 
the best man to lead the most powerful 
nation on earth for the next four years. And 
the next four years will not be easy ones. 
The president, whoever he is, will inherit 
tough problems that will require tough de- 
cisions. He will have to be a man with 
backbone, with leadership, and with a clear 
vision for the future of this country. We, the 
Editorial Board of the Blue Stocking, be- 
lieve that man to be Bill Clinton 

When you are trying to decide whether 
or not to vote for an incumbent president, 
you should first look very carefully at his 
record. President Bush says he is the "en- 
vironmental president," but his policies tell 
another story. He is now trying to gut the 
Clean-Air Act. He wants to change the 
definition of wetlands, which will allow half 
of them to be destroyed. And he has allowed 
the timber industry to cut down the old 
growth forests of the Northwest in order to 
save a few short-term jobs. 

Bush says he is the "education presi- 
dent." Yet our nation's students continue to 
lag far behind other industrial countries in 
iniemational comparisons. He has given the 
schools of our nation vague goals that lack 
any su]^x>rt And President Bush did not 
start talking about "school choice" until an 
election year demanded iL 

Bush claims lo be an expert on foreign 
poUcy. Yet he coddled the regime in China 
even after they shot protestors in Tiananmen 
Square, and still gives China "Most Favored 
Nation" status. Bush was very slow to 
accept and support Boris Yeltsin's democ- 
racy movement in the former USSR. He 
went to Japan, not to remove barriers to fair 
trade, but to try to strong-arm the Japanese 
into buymg more of our products. Finally, 
he supported Saddam Hussein's ruthless 
regime right up until the day Iraq invaded 
Kuwait. 

Perhaps the worst result of the Reagan 
and Bush presidencies is the prolonged re- 
cession through which we have suffered. 
Thanks largely to the enormous deficit that 
financed the growthof the 8()'s, the economy 
has remained .stagnant rather than posting 
the large gains of typical post-recession 



periods. Bush has left things so that PC 
graduates have to struggle to find jobs. And 
once again, he proposed no plan until an 
election year dictated it. 

Not so with Bill Clinton. The Governor 
of Arkansas has been proposing the same 
plans all along - ideas he has formulated 
after careful study, and ideas that have 
worked in his home stale. 

The very things for which Bill Clinton 



by Jason West 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

After month sand months of campaign- 
ing, an endless sea of political commercials, 
and countless polls, the American presiden- 
tial campaign will finally be over next week. 
Hallelujah! 

In my opinion, the 1992 presidential 
campaign has been too long and too drawn 
out. Like you, I too will be glad when it is all 
over. However, bclore going into that s;i- 
crcd booth to mark your ballot, 1 would like 



Clinton vs. Bush 



is criticized will make him an effective 
president. He is young and energetic; he 
understands the important issues and can 
speak coherently about them; he appeals to 
people on both sides of an issue and brings 
them towards the common ground. 

It is this last characteristic which is the 
most important. We are tired of the divi- 
siveness that has defined the Bush adminis- 
tration. From the first "Willie Horton"ad to 
the LA riots, race relations have been severely 
.strained under President Bush. He has also 
been extremely partisan, blaming Congress 
for all our country's ills while refusing to 
work with its members . 

A CUnion adminisu^tion, on the other 
hand, would strive for the best plan, regard- 
less of the source. Bill Clinton will bring 
together the best and the brightest in the 
nation, who will work together to make this 
country great once again. They wouW make 
taxes more fair, control the spiraling costs of 
health care, and stimulate the economy in 
the short term while investing for the long 
term. Ginton is a man who would attack 
problems before they turn into crises, from 
the inner cities lo education. We want a 
president who will prevent, not react; a 
president who will lead the country, not 
bicker and point fingers; a president who 
runs on hope, not on fear. Bill Cliniorr will 
be that President. 



for you to consider just which candidate is 
truly "right" for America. 

The office of the President of the United 
States is the highest in our government, and 
it carries a great deal of responsibility. The 
office of President can only be filled by an 
individual who has shown stn)ng support 
for his country, has a character that is un- 
questionable, and has the sincere desires 
and hopes of the American people m his 
heart. It is my opinion that George Bush is 
the only candidate who meets those pre- 
requisites, and he should be re-elected by 
the American people. 

A great deal of this campaign has been 
focused on the economy. To hear democrat 
Bill Clinton, one would think that the tn)uble 
with the economy isallGcorge Bu.sh'sfault 
This is absolutely incorrect! It is true that 
our economy is in a recession; however. 
George Bush did not create that recession. I 
hale to disappoint my democratic friends, 
but the president, no matter who cxcupies 
the office, does not have the ability to create 
jobs or growth. The president's pcwer over 
the economy is very limited. A large chunk 
of the rcsponsi billy for the raession we 
currently find ourselves in belongs to those 
beloved and courageous men and women on 
Capitol Hill, who so faithfully manipulau- 
this counu-y and its people. 

Actually, the ccont)my is doing better 



The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVII, Number 3 
OctobCT30. 1992 



Editor in-Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

PoUtki Editor Ted Carmichacl 

Sports Editor Evcrette Catts 

Entertainment Editor Camisha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather Moncrief 

Photography Editor Kim Gibstm 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



Advertising Editor Ann Mayfield 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Mixon 

Artist Michael Chn.sicnsen 

Photography Staff 
Kimberlee Gibson Todd Love 



Staff Writers 
Eli/iibeth Cunard 
Leigh Heamhurg 
Kristma Pniin 
Paula Wanen 
Rnan Sacco 
Kim Rabon 
Tobin Turner 



Amanda Bowers 
Katherme Bonner 
ChCT Fulbright 
Michelle Cantey 
Shelly Phipps 
Jamcy Pate 
Tonia Snead 



The Blue Stocking is a iri weekly sludcnl publi 

cation of Presbyterian College The pajx-r serves 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional and 
national concern. For advcrtismg, conuct The 
Blue Sim king. Presbyienan College. Box 1()61. 
Clinton. SC 2932.*>. The Blue Stocking wel 
comes letters to the editor from all members of 
the PC community. Signatures are required. 
Letters are printed on a space available basis. 
The Blue Slocking reserves the nghl to edit all 
letters for proper grammar and punctuation. 
The final deadline for submitting letters is Fn 
day at 12:()()pmon the week before publication 



than most Americans realize, and thanks to 
George Bu.sh, it is beginning to show some 
signs of recovery. Inflation has been cut 
companies arc becoming more productive, 
and America is exporting more. These are 
signs of improvement not signs of impend- 
ing disaster. 

B il 1 CI inton .say s that he has the answers 
to America's economic woes and has 
promised u.s that he will do for America 
what he has done lor the stale of Arkansas. 
Well, 1 don'iknow if that issuchagood idea 
Consider the facts. 0\ all the 50 slates. 
Arkansas is ranked 4S in the percentage of 
people living in poverty. 17 in highest tax 
burdcn,and47 in per capita income. IdtMi't 
thmk 1 would like an America with higher 
taxes, less income, and more poverty. 

There has also been a great deal of talk 
in this campaign about America spending 
less time in tnaticrs abroad and more lime on 
matters at home. President Bush has been 
unfairly criticized for the lime and energy he 
places on international issues. The lime in 
history has come when there is no such thing 
as separate iniemational issues and separate 
doiiKsiic issues. Everything is "intermesuc." 
and what happens in Russia, China, and 
Saudi Arabia has a dramatic effect on what 
happens in Atlanta. Charlotte. Chicago, and 
Clinton, South Carolina. 

George Bush has played a vital role in 
the world-wide spread of democracy, the 
reducuon of the threat of global nuclear war. 
and the ending of tensions between the United 
States and the lomier Soviet Union. He is an 
international player who has provided lead- 
ership ftir Amenc a and all free people around 
the world. 

What experience does Bill Clinton have 
dealing with Boris Yeltsin, John Mapr. or 
Francois Mittcrand? He has none. Because 
of this lack of expenence, the thought of Bill 
Clinton calling the shots in the While House 
Situation RtxMn fnghtens me. li should 
fnghten you. 

The choice of who is going to lead 
America belongs to all of us. We should all 
thank God every day for that choice. 

This elecuon year. I stand behind G&xge 
Bu.sh becau.sc he is the only candidate whom 
I trust to do what is right for America. 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



NEWS 



Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Edtior - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor - Letters to the Editor 



Dear Editor: 

1 chose this college over others for 
multiple reasons; the most prominent being 
the beauty of the campus and the dedication 
of the students to numerous causes: Habitat 
for Humanity. Amnesty Inicmauonal, and 
vanoas projects through SVS. 

1 have never seen such beauty in the 
combination of uees, flowers, buildings, 
and weailier as I view it here. It creates a 
pleasant aunosphcre to enjoy life, study 
diligently, and grow personally. 

I am disturbed when 1 walk around 
campus and view posters lor cvenis held a 
week ago and writing on the sidewalks for 
elections long since gone. This makes the 
campus look dilapidated and presents a p(K)r 
impression for reluming alumni and pro- 
spective students. 

It ought to be part of the process of 
making signs and hanging them up to also 
lake them down. All it lakes is a liiile lime 
and effort to apply the dcdicaion of the 
students to the ciunpusand make everyone's 
lives miM-e enjoyable. 

Sincerely, 
Jason D. Lee 



Dear Editor: 

This letter is in response to the environ- 
mental page in the September 1 8 issue of the 
Blue Stocking. 

1 feel that the article entitled 'The 
Presidency and the Envuonment " reflected 
a blatant bias in favor of the Clinion/Gore 
ticket. In the article, the writer outlines the 
enviriwmental policies of the Republican 
and Dem(x;raiic nominees. It is highly pe- 
culiar that the article only elaborates on 
negauve aspects of the President's policies 
without prcsenung his reasons for the actions 
taken, while the only negauve thing men- 
tioned about the Governor from Arkansas' 
record was quickly followed up by a vague 
rebuttal about clean waier regulations. 

Allow me to set the record suaight 
President Bush not only "claims to be the 
environmental President," as the writer 
points out, but his record proves that to be 
ihc truth. 1 senoasly wonder if the writer 
even researched the President's record, or if 
so did she care to present the whole story. 

George Bush pu.shed for the 1990Clean 
Air Act which received bipartisan support. 
In 1990-91, the Bush Adminisu-alion ob- 
tained a record number of convictions for 
environmental cnmes. The Bush Adminis- 



tration has collected more fines in the last 
three years than in the last 20 years com- 
bined. George Bush established a National 
Manne Sanctuary, covenng almost 5000 
square miles where drilling will be perma- 
nently banned. FYesident Bush proposes to 
plant a billion uees a year in his "America 
the Beauuful" program and to end clear- 
cutting as a standard practice in our national 
forests. During his first lerm. George Bush 
added more than 1.5 million acres to 
Amenca's national pasks and other public 
lands. President Bush led a United Nation's 
effort to Slop drift net fishing on the high 
seas by the end of this year. How did these 
facts escape the atlcnuon of the writer? 

The Govemcw from Arkansas, on the 
other hand, has not been quite as successful 
with the environment in his own stale. It 
may supnse the author to find out that after 
12 years of Clinton leaderehip, Arkansas 
ranks 10th highest in per capita ozone de- 
pleung emission, 42nd m percentages of 
clean nvers and streams, 50lh for lack of 
government action to protect the environ- 
ment and a dismal 48ih m overall envuDn- 
mental quality. 

I was disappointed to find such irre- 



sponsible jourruilism in the Blue Stocking. I 
hope that such articles don't frequent the 
pages of the Blue Stocking. Thank you for 
your attention to this matter. 

Sincerely, 
BUI Wright 

* (Editor's Note - The Blue Stocking Edi- 
torial Board appreciates Mr. Wright's letter 
and opinion; however, we stand behind 
KnstinaPruiU's article. The Edi tonal Board 
believes that Ms. Pruiii's article was well 
researched and unbiased.) 



The Blue Stocking staff en- 
courages students to express 
their concerns bv writing let- 
ters to the editor. Letters for 
the next edition must be 
turned into the Blue Stocking 
office by Friday, Novemberl J. 



PC student killed in car accident 




Presbyterian College Se- 
nior Marcus Miller died on 
October 20 as ihe result of 
injuries sustained in a car 
wreck. Miller was returning lo 
campus from fall break when 
the accident acurred. 

Miller was the son of Mr. 
Robert Lee and Mrs. Nannie 
Posley Miller and was a mem- 
ber of Dunn Creek Baptist 
Church. 

Members of the Presbyte- 
rian College baseball icam 
served as pallbearers and hon- 
orary escorts at the funeral ser- 
vice. Senior Jay Reeves re- 
flected on Miller's coniribu- 
lions to the team. 

"Marcus was ihe biggest 
silent leader we had. In the 
way he played the game and 
lived his life, he was never 
ltx)king for prestige That's 
the way every player should 
be" 

Miller, a native of 
Donalds, South Carolina, was 
scheduled to graduiite from 
PresbyterianCollegethis May. 



Williamson elected to national office 



OFRCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

A member of Presbyienan College's 
administrative staff has been selected to 
serve as Presideni-elai of a national admis- 
sions a.s.sociaiion. 

Margaret Williamson, PC's vice prwi- 
dent of enrollment and dean of admissions, 
will take office in January 
as president-elect of ihc 
National Association of 
College Admissions 
Counselors (NACAC). 
Her elecuon came at the 
fall meeting, held earlier 
this month in Los Ange- 
les, 

She will serve as 
president of the associa- 
tion in 1994, the first PC 
admintstrative officer ever 
to he^ a national organi- 
sation 




of this association, I'll be addressing issues 
that affect admission counseling on both the 
secondary and post-secondary tevels." 

NACAC, with headquarters in Alexan- 
dria. Vu-ginia, focuses m educauon legisla- 
tion and conducts wwkshops and programs 
for members and non- 
members all across the 
country. 

"We arc also constanUy 
evaluating the ethical is.sues 
involved m our field," 
Wiliamson said, "such as 
what the admission officer 
and secondary school 
counselor should and 
should noi do, and what the 
students' rights arc." 



Williamson, a native of 



Margaret Wlllianison 

NACAC boasts a membership of 5,367 Blacksburg, Virginia, earned her under 
ollege admissions officers, secondary graduate and master's degrees from 



Marcus Miller played an integral role in PI' Baseball. 
Miller was killed in an automobile accident last week. 

file photo 



schoi»l counsetors. and independent coun- 
selors. The national organi/aiion. which 
focuses on issues dealing with stu<knts' 
uansiuon from secondary lo p(«l-sca>nd- 
ary educalton. includes 22 .state and regiwial 
associations and one international associa- 
tion. 

"1 am very honored to be elected to this 
position," Williamson said. 'As an officer 



Winihrop College in Rock Hill, South 
Carolina. She came lo PC m 1982 as director 
of admissions and m 1991 received ilw 
college's Disunguished Service Award. 

As an active member of NACAC. she 
has SCTved on numerous commitiecs and 
held a variety of leadership positions, in- 
cluding serving as president of the Southern 
ACAC in 1989-90. 



POLITICS 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



Beckel predicts that Bush will be 'unemployed' in January 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

The second installment of the Russell 
Committee's "Election '92" series was held 
in Belk Auditorium on October 1 3. Bob 
Beckel spoke that morning to a full crowd, 
giving a democratic perspective on the U.S. 
elections this year and the media's role in 
them. Beckel is a national political consult- 
ant and the moderator of Fox TW's Off the 
Record. He also is a guest host for QsfN's 
Larry King Live, and often appears on news 
programs of the three major networks. 

Beckel opened his talk lightly, joking 
about Republicans in the back with weapons 
and commenting that it is "nice to be in such 
a bastion of liberal Democratic values." He 
also said of his running Walter Mondale's 
presidential bid, "At least I got him the 
nomination; someone else ran the general 
election." 

Beckel then spoke about President Bush, 
saying, "I'll try to be kind to someone who 
is about to be unemployed." Actually, he 
Slopped short of predicting the election, but 
said that if George Bush wins, it will be by 
"the barest of margins," and also that Bill 
Clinton may get as many as 400 electoral 
voles. He said he doesn't know why people 
"turned on [Bush] as quickly as they did," 
but he did talk about some possible reasons 
for Bush's low approval rating. 

Beckel said that people look at three 
primary things before they vote: "Charac- 
ter; their wallets; and who is the best pcrstjn 
as Commander-in-Chief, who can have his 
finger on the button." In 1988, all three 
things worked for George Bush, Beckel 
said. Now. however, they are not. 'There'.s 
no button anymore. The fear is gone. There 
will be hoLspoLs every now and then, but the 
average American doesn't care about that." 




Bob Beckel visited the PC campus to give students a "demcKratic perspective" on 

the upcoming election. p/^,^ ^^ sieve o^ens 

HcalsosaidthalBush'scharacterwascalled a domestic agenda that would address the 

into question when he broke his tax pledge, racssion. 

About the aonomy, Beckcl's view is, "Ex- He staled that, in poliucs, there are cycles 

peciauons went way up because of the Gulf of 20 to 30 years. Jimmy Carter's presi- 

War," but then Bush failed to come up with dency wasa"nukedcpendcni()n Waicrgaie." 



which was in the middle of a Republican era. 
Beckel thinks that we arc at an end of a cycle 
now, and thai "people want a change" in ihe 
presidency. 

"For the Democrats it has worked out," 
Bakel said. "A lot of things are propelhng 
this cyclical change. ..and [Clinton] is smart 
enough to get in front of it." He descnbes 
Clinton as "a better opponent than Bush 
expected" and says he is not a typical 
dem(x:rai in the public's eyes. Two differ- 
ences, according to Beckel, are Clinton's 
belief in capital punishmcniand his workfair 
program. "The old liberal tax and spend lag 
d(x;sn't work because he is not like other 
Democrats." 

"And then," Beckel adds, "you have Jug 
Flars," referring to independent candidate 
Ross Peroi. "Pcrcx has something 1 wLsh I 
had - a billion dollars." He said that Perot 
IS paranoid and ha.s a large ego. The two 
reasons, according to Beckel, that Perot got 
back into the race were the newpaper head- 
line that said," Another wimp bites the Du.si," 
and ihc cover oi Newsweek that labled him 
a "quitter." 

As tar as the press is concerned, Beckel 
said that they arc Kx) "driven" by polls but 
have done a heller job of covering ihis 
election than past ones. They are more 
eauUous in their reporting, ask harder ques- 
tions, and report more on negative advenis- 
ini; 

Aside Irom his work managing 
Mondale's campaign, Beckel was also ver>' 
active in working wiih Robert Kennedy. 
I nder the Carter Adminisu-aiion, he was a 
menik'r ol the White House siaf t and worketl 
with Congress on the Mideast and Salt II 
tn-aties Heckle closed his lecture by urging 
everyone to vole, saying that the nghi to 
voU' 'tiH)k us 1{X) long to get,.|and| is too 
praious a comnuKliiy" to give up. 



Make Your Vote Count 

The following is a list of candiates for Congressional seats 
in the state of South Carolina. 



Congressional District. #1 
(Includes Charleston, Hilton Head, and Myrtle Beach} 

Arthur Ravenel (I) - Republican 

Bill Oberst - Democrat 

John Peeples - American 

Congressional District #2 
(Includes Lexington and parts of Columbia) 

Floyd Spence (I) - Republican 
Geb Sommer - Libertarian 

Congressional District. #3 
(Includes Anderson and Aiken) 

Butler Derrick (I) - Democrat 
James Bland - Republican 




ContTPssinnjil Pi^trift fl 
(Includes Greenville and Spartanburg) 

Liz Patterson (I) Democrat 

Bob Inglis li<'publican 
Jo Jorgensen Libertanan 

Comn-pssinnHi pjhtrirti fffi 
(Includes Rock Hill, Chester, and Camden) 

John Spratt (I) Democrat 
Bill Home Republican 

ConcTRSsinnnl District, #f? 
(Includes Orangeburg, parts of Charleston, and parts of Columbia) 

John Chase Republican 
Jim Clybum Democrat 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



POLITICS 



College Republicans and Young Democrats active on campus 



by Neely Loring 
STAFF WRITER 

Many students at PC have been active in 
this year's political arena. Each major party, 
both Democrats and the Republicans, have 
had active student groups on campus. One 
noticeable absence, 
however, has been 
any organized sup- 
port for Ross Perot 

The College Re- 
publicans have had 
a number of speak- 
ers this semester, 
such as Eddie 
McGee, who is the 
Laurens County re- 
publican nominee 
for sheriff. The 
group has also of- 
fered an informa- 
tion table in Springs 
Campus Center and 
is in the process of 
organizing a phone 
bank for the Bush 
campaign. A group 

of College Republicans attended a South 
Carolina strategy meeting in Columbia ear- 
lier this fall and has been acuve in the local 
Republican Party. 

The Young Democrats have involved 
themselves with the South Carolina Clinton/ 
Gore campaign. David Agncw, a member 
of the state campaign, spoke to a group of 



faculty and students in September. Young 
Democrats sponsored "A Man from Hope," 
a video mini-biography on Bill CImton, 
which was shown on the PC cable channel. 

Other events in- 
cluded organiz- 
ing a group to 
see Bill Chnton 
speak last month 
in Columbia, 
distributing leaf- 
lets at football 
games, weekly 
meetings, and 
working on a 
county wide 
phone bank. 

Many members 

attended a local 

fund raiser for 

their national 

ticket and acted 

as pages. Guests 

at the fund rai.ser 

included Senator Hollings, Congressman 

BuUer Derrick, and former Governor Dick 

Riley. 

The Young Democrats and College Re- 
publicans jointly sponsored two debates this 
fall. A local debate was held a Bethany 
Presbyterian Church with Ted Carmichael 
reprcsenung the Young Democrats and Brian 




Bencnhaley representing the College Re- 
publicans. The debate was held for the 
Cbnton Boy Scouts and their parents. 

A second debate for the PC community 
was held in 
Edmunds Hall this 
past Monday. Thai 
debate featured 
Barry Wynn, South 
Carolina's Repub- 
lican Party Chair- 
man, and Don 
Fowler, a member 
of the Democratic 
National Commit- 
tee. This event was 
videotaped and is 
slated to be shown 
on the PC Cable 
Network. 

Thetwopohti- 
cal groups are also, 
planning to orga- 
nize uips to Co- 
lumbia on the eve 

of the election, in order to join their party's 
state organizations for the returns. 

Both groups are hoping that members 
will maintain iheu^ enthusiasm after No- 
vember 3. 

"A lot of people have gotten involved in 
this year's elections that may not have oth- 
erwise," commented Kelly Reiser, iw^i- 



(knt of the College RepuMicans. 

According to Reiser, Uie College Re- 
publicans are hoping to keep the numbo' of 
active members near 50. 



Katharine 
Spearman, a 
member of the 
Young Demo- 
crats, said, "I 
have been very 
encouraged by 
the wide re- 
sponse to the 
Democratic 
ticket at such a 
conservative 
school." 



^kSS 



I 



Spearman re- 
ports that the 
Young Demo- 
crats are hc^ng 
to keep their 
membership 
around 15 «:iivc members. 

Regardless oi party affiliation, membera 
from both clubs agree that the most impor- 
tant purpose of the political acuviues on 
campus has been U) encourage stucknts to be 
educated on the candidates and to excercise 
their right to vote. 



College educators endorse Clinton 



by Shellev Phipps 

STAFF WRITER 

With the 1992 Presidenual elecuon just 
a few days away, the South Carolina Col- 
lege and University 
Educators for Clinton/ 
Gore held a press con 
ference in Columbia 
yesterday to release the 
names of college pro- 
fessors and faculty who 
openly support the 
demcKralic nominees. 

The original plan of 
Uk" group was to buy ads 
in three South Carolina 
newsfapcrs hsiing Bill 
CUnion and Al Gore's 

supporters. However. ^ « /^ n l . 

federal election laws Hr. Kenneth B. Orr f^lep>uHo 

complicated that effort. The press confer 



■ 


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i^'^ i 


1 

.i 


1 


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i^ 


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ence provided a forum during which a list of 
the supporters could be released. 

The organi/iilion of educators was ini- 
uatcd by Presbyterian College President 
Kenneth B. Orr. With the assistance of 
poliucal science professor David Gillespie, 
Orr conductetl the formal correspondence 
with college professors across the slate to 



idenufy those who were Clinton/Gore sup- 
poncre. 

"The purpose of the orga- 
nization was to stimulate 
interest in the candidacy 
of Clinton and Gore by 
encouraging educators to 
enlist support on their own 
campuses for the Dcmo- 
crauc ticket," said On. 

Orr has received some 
cnticKsm for showing his 
partisanship m this elec- 
tion year. He acknowl- 
edges that criticism is to 
be expected. 
*This is a season of endorsements. I 
wasn't willing to sit on the sidelines for this 
campaign." said Orr. 

According to Or, the list of South 
Carolina College and University Educators 
for ClinU)n/Gorc is simply individual sup- 
port of the candidates. "It is in no way an 
endors4*ment by any college or university," 
added Orr. 



Parents Day Special! 

20% off to all students and parents! 




"Ladies Boutique 

316 E. Carolina Ave., Clinton 




FEATURES 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



IRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



FEATURES 



PC community joins nationwide movement 'Into the Streets' 



by Martha Lynn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

The moito on the Presbyterian College 
seal reads simply, "DumVivimusServimus." 
Translated, the motto means, "While we live, 
we serve," and the coUege'sstudents, faculty, 
and staff will put that motto into action on 
November 7 when the college community 
goes into the streets of Laurens County to join 
a nationwide community service project. 

The "Into the Streets" program, designed 
to heighten volunieerism among young people 
and to provide a learning experience that will 
challenge them to volunteer on a regular 
basis, is a national program sponsored by the 
Campus Outreach Opportunities League 
(COOL), of which PC is a member. A three 
year grant fron the W. K. Kellogg Founda- 
tion made funding for this event possible. 

"In keeping with one of the national 
goals of the Into the Streets' movement, we 
arc proud to have a diverse group of college 
and community volunteers working together 
toward a common service goal," said Chon 
Glover, coordinator of Student Volunteer 
Services (SVS) at PC. 




On November 7, K students, faculty, 
staff, and community representatives will 
spend five hours serving Laurens County 
rcsidcnis in a variety of .service areas that 
include; 

*Homelessness: Volunteers will work 
to build houses on Habitat for Humanity 
work sites. 

•Hospice: Participants will canvass the 
county, visiung the home-bound, making 
necessary repairson private and public homes. 

•Literacy: Volunteers will work to make 
Laurens County residents aware of literacy 
opportunities and needs. 

•Senior Citizens: Groups will assist the 
elderly by making necessary repairs to private 
and public homes. 

•Knvironment: Volunteers will pick 
up trash along Laurens County roadsides. 

"We are challenging each campus or- 
ganization to have at least 50 percent par- 
ticipation. Some groups have already reached 
that goal," said SVS Intern Laura Smith. 

For more information about the pro- 
gram, contact Chon Glover. 



PC Peer Connectors are ready to listen 



by Kim Rabon 

STAFF WRITER 

Have you ever had a problem and needed^ 
someone to listen to you? Peer connectors do 
just that The PeerConnection program at PC 
is a way for PC students to express feelings 
about individual problems or everyday con- 
cerns confidentially to another caring person. 

"The goal of Peer Connection is to es- 
tablish a network of visible, trained, and 
trustworthy students to assist their peers with 
personal concerns, issues, and conflicts," said 
Assistant Dean of Students Resa Walch. 

"Peer connectors will listen and help 
students make decisions about what to do as 
well as refer students to appropriate re- 
sources," added Walch. , 

The PeerConnection program began last 
year when a group of PC students suggested 
that it would be a gtxxl idea to have a peer 
counseling progr^ on campus. The Office 
of Student Affairs agreed and implemented 
the pr(^{ram, which is now in its second 



semester of operation. 

"Last year I had a few problems of my 
own and PC didn't have this program yet I 
think that the peer connectors could have 
really helped me sort out and understand 
some of my feelings," said SeUna Patrick, 
one of the peer connectors. 

"I wanted to be a part of the program 
because I know that there are students at PC 
who have problems and need someone to 
listen," added Patrick. 

"We are all very excited about the pro- 
gram. The peer connectors are ready and 
willing to help the students at PC. We can 
only hope that the students will u.se the pro- 
gram when they do need to talk," said Julie 
Nielsen, a peer connector. 

According to Walsh, 1 3 PC students are 
serving as peer connectors. The .students 
have gone through extensive training to en 
sure that they handle situations in the best 
possible way. If anyone is interested in 
becoming a peer connector, applications will 
be available next semester. 



A 



\/ 



The Episcopal Church Especially Welcomes Students 

+ ALL SAINTS' EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

One Block North of Greenville Dining Hall 
Sundiv Schpri.il*. 

8.30 am Holy Eucharist 
9.43 am Chiiuian lEducitton 
10.30 am Coffee (in Parish Hill) 

11.00 am Holy Eucharist 
6.00 pm ♦ CANTERBURY — hr College Students 
• Need someone to talk to? 

IIk Rev N«jKy J All.ion, Reciof (833-1388) 

The Rev Lcnii»n Peaijon, Pntsion-Campus (833-8295) 




PC's Peer CoiMCtors Indude Leigh Stokes, Jenny Goodwin, Julie Jacques, Jennifer 
Elliott, (Buck Rofw) Lee May nard, Patrick l^)ng, Cynthia Seeiiger, Julie Neilsen.Cher 
Fulbright, and Helen Moore. file photo 




What's cookin' at PC: Springs Canteen at night 






iM 



(Jeorge Brooks loves to cook. "There's rwthing better." he pro- 
claims As a gourmet chef, Brooks has had years of praaice. He has 
cooked for Presidential outfits, Mamie Eisenhower, five star restaurant^, 
cooking schools, and more. However, he is at home now with his wife 
Rhudene, whom many will recognize from her worit in NeviUe Hall. 

His specialty is Cordon Bleu. Unfortunately, the Spnngs canteen is 
not equipped for that But students may order from the regular menu on 
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fndays or have take-out pizza on Mondays 
and Thursdays. 




During halftime at the 
PC/Catawba football 
game, senior Laura 
Meyers was crowned 
the 1992 Homecoming 
Queen. Meyers, a 
resident of Columbia, 
South Carolma, was 
sponsored by Sigma 
Nu. She was escorted 
by Matthew Gruhn. 



photo by Jason West 




Little Known Facts 

Ehiring the first academk: term at PC in 1880, tuition was $25 for freshmen 
and sophomores and $30 for juniors and seniors. With room and board, the cost for 
one year was $100. 

Although PC was not rcsidentially co-ed until 1%5, PC has had female 
students since the beginning. In fact, the entire 1883 graiuaiing class consisted of throe 

women. ^ .r^ ,, rr^ 

■Source: TheSointofPC 

Hammea, 1982. 



Good news in one hundred words or less 

by Mary Brockman Pressley 

Seeing a smile on a child's face can read them a story, make a craft, and play 



make anyone smile. But knowing that you 
put it there makes you smile inside. 

Every other Wednesday, 1 5 kids from 
Baily Elementary come over to PC to "play." 
About five volunteers along with Dean 
Sheom and mc play games, do crafts, and do 
other things of interest with these elementary 
school children. 

Each time we meet with the kids, we 



different gan>es. From making tambourines 
out of aluminum cans and [Nnto beans to 
seeing who can make the scariest Hallow- 
een mask, each child takes pride in what he 
or she makes. Their faces definitely show it! 
The time that we spend with our 
"Baily Buddies" may be short, but the differ- 
ence we make m their lives will last forever. 



Diversity Week promotes interaction 

Events planned at PC from Nov. 1 - 8 



by Paula Warren 

STAFF WRITER 

November 1 ihnxigh 8, Presbyterian 
College will be one of many colleges and 
universities throughout the nation 
celebrating Cultural Diversity Week. The 
week's purpose is to promote multicultural 
interaction and develop lasting lies 
throughout the year. 

Local acuvities for the celebration are 
being sponsored by the Office of Minority 
Affairs. Oi Sunday, Novemba 1, a talent 
show will be held at 7:30 pm in Edmunds 
Hall. Students will be able to show their 
talcnLs in the areas of singing, dancing, and 
rapping m a relaxed and non-threataung 
atmcephere. 

The campus can sample otlKM^ cultures 
through food tasung. music, books, and 
more at the Multicultural Fair. The fair will 
be held from 2«) pmlo4:00pm on Monday , 
November 2. at Springs Campus Center. 

A scncs of videos will be shown on 



cable channel 33 on Tuesday. November 3. 
On Wednesday . November 4 , ai 7: 30pm . Dr. 
Jerman Disasa will discuss changing 
challenges into opportunities. Disasa, a 
lecturer at USC-Columbia m Higher 
Education and Inicmaticmal Educabon, is a 
native Afrkan from Ethopia. The event is a 
CEP and will be heW ui Edmunds Hall. 

There will be programming in the 
residence halls on Thursday. November 5, 
On Friday , November 6, at 4: 30 pm , CropwaUc 
will be held. Also. SUB will be sponsoring 
a Reggaefesi f« Fall Fhng. From 8:00 amto 
1 :00 pm on Saturday, November 7, "Into the 
Streets" of Laivens County will be hcW. 

The final activity of the week will be the 
Gospel Extravi^anza. The event will feature 
PC's Student Fellowship Choir and other 
college and chuch choirs. The Extravagaui 
is a CEP event and will be hcU at 7:30 pm ii 
Edmunds Hall on Fnday, Novemba 8. 



SPORTS 



8 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



Blue Hose men's soccer team captures SAC - 8 title 



by Brian Sacco 

Staff Writer 

Finishing the season with outstanding 
play, the Blue Hose men's soccer team 
rdled to the regular season South Atlantic 



the season." 

On October 3, the Blue Hose hosted 
Lenior Rhyne College on the pondo in a 
must-win SAC game. The game was 




PC's Shannon Brown takes on two WofTord defenders. 



file photo 



Conference title. The team finished the 
regular season with a 6-0-1 conference 
record and a 14-2-2 record overall. 

Senior Richard Eckardt stated, "We 
were always optimistic that we would 
win, but it was stretched out to the end of 



important not only in the Blue Hose quest 
for the SAC title but also because PC was 
sedcing vengeance against a team they had 
never defeated. PC posted a 4- 1 victory as 
Chris Bruno, Will Lindstrom, Chris Napior, 
and Norman de Waart .scored goals for the 



Blue Hose. Richard Wright, Lindstfom, and 
goalkeeper Mark Albertus assisted on the 
goals. 

The following Wednesday, PC uavelled 
to Columbia to tackle the University of 
South Carolina,an NCAA division one team. 
The Blue Hose had several opportunities to 
score but were defeated 2-1. Chris Napior 
scored on a penalty kick after Chris Bruno 
was fouled in the goalkeeper's box. 

Coach Poison stated, "Although we 
were disappointed by the final score, we had 
our best performance against them ever." 

In another important SAC game, the 
Blue Hose hosted rival Catawba College on 
October 10 during Homecoming. Tyler 
Boulware scored PC's only goal from a 
Lindsu-om a.ssist. The game ended in a 1-1 
tie, which enabled PC to remain m a favorable 
position in the SAC with a 4-0- 1 record in 
the conference. 

The following day, PC hosted Savannah 
College in a non-conference match-up. The 
Blue Hose played their way to a 6-0 victory, 
as Bruno led the team with two goals and an 
assist. John Mairs, Michael Martin, de Waart, 
and Napior added goals for PC, while Ja.son 
Woodall, Dan Walbolt, Napior, and Wnghi 
contributed a.ssists in the game for goals. 

Two days later, the Blue Hose ravelled 
toGardner Webb for a must-win SAC game. 
Napior scored two goals and de Waart added 
one as PC chalked up another victory, 3-2. 



Lindstrom and Bruno both had a.ssisLs in the 
game. Goalkeeper Mark Albcrias was named 
SAC player of the week for October 3-10, 
the second individual conference award 
given to a PC player this season. 

Over fall break , the soccer learn travelled 
to Panama City, Florida, for the Panama 
City College Soccer Classic. On Saturday, 
October 17, PC took on Birmingham 
Southern and was victorious with a score of 
3- 1 . Woodall scored a "hat trick" with three 
goals, while Bruno and Lindstrom each had 
assists. Sunday's meeting with Berry 
College ended with neither learn scoring, 
but PC did lie a sch(X)l record with their 
eighth shutout of the season. 

On October 2 1 , PC tangled with Lander 
College and pulled out a 4-3 victory m 
ovenime. Lmdsirom led PC wiih two goals, 
while Bruno and Walboli each added a goal. 
Bruno, Napior, and Walbolt contributed 
assists in the well-earned victory. The win, 
making the team's record 13-2-2, tied a 
second school record for regular .season 
wins. 

In order to capture the conference title, 
the Blue Hose had to defeat lough foe Elon 
College. PC rose to the challenge and 
defeated the Fighting Christians on the road 
last Saturday. Bruno led offthe scoring with 
an assist from Robert Coding. Boulware 
assisted de Waart on the second goal, and 
Lindstrom finished out the sconng with an 
assist from Shannon Brown. 



Football team rips Mars Hill 



by Everett Catts 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Following two straight los.ses, the Blue 
Hose football team improved its record in 
the SAC to 2-2 (3-4 overall) by defeating 
Mais Hill on Ocu^)er 24, 19-6. In a game 
influenced by special teams and defense, PC 
scored all of its points in a second quarter 
explosion. 

Four seconds into the second quarter, 
Alex Horton kicked a 26 yard field goal to 
make the score 3-0. With 13:42 remaining, 
the Blue Hose's Brett Turner intercepted a 
pass at the Mars Hill seven yard line and 
returned for a touchdown. Horlon's extra 
point gave PC a 10-0 lead. That lead was 
lengthened to 1 3-0 with a 46 yard field goal 
by Horton with 8:58 left in the half. After 
Rodney Lightsey blocked a Mars Hill field 
goal attempt with 1:08 remaining, Tony 
Robertson picked up the loose ball and ran 
73 yards for a touchdown. The two-point 
conversion was unsuccessful, and PC left 
the field at halftime with a 19-0 lead. 

Although the Blue Hose were unable to 
score again, they won 1 9-6, thanks in part to 
the play of the defense and special teams. 
Although no Offensive Player of the Week 
was announced, Ron Palmer sparked the PC 
offense. Palmer, a wide receiver, caught 
four passes for 68 yards. 

Named Defensive Player of the Week 
was defensive end Brett Turner, who had 



nine tackles to go along with his intercepti(Hi 
and touchdown. Defensive back Tyron 
Phillips had three interceptions, along with 
Robertson's single pick. Linebacker 
Anionion Meni wether had another great 
game, with 10 stops. 

Three people were named Special 
Teams Player of the Week. First, kicker 
Alex Honon was honored for his kickoffs 
and his field goals, which gave PC the lead. 
Rodney Lightsey and Quincy Eigner, both 
defensive backs, were recognized for 
blocking kicks. Lightsey blocked a field 
goal which was relumed for a touchdown, 
and Eigner blocked a punt, giving the Blue 
H(»eoffense good field posiiKX). In addition, 
the special teams had a total of 198 return 
yards on the day. 

Head Coach John Perry commented on 
the team's defense, saying, 'They were 
sturdy, making big plays. The defensive 
li ne balled down pas.ses and had scnnc tackles 
for losses, forcing them (Mars Hill) out of a 
rhythm." 

On PC's special teams. Perry said, "If 
you add up all of the yardage on everything 
(kickoffs, punts, field goals, and all returns), 
it helps with field position tremendously." 

The Blue Hose host Wingate tomorrow 
for Parents' Day and arc also home against 
Gardner- Webb on November 7. 



Midnight Madness at PC 

Blue Hose to hold first b-ball practice 



by Everett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

The 1992-93 men's basketball team 
begins its season in Templeton Gym on 
Halloween, and they want everyone to 
join. At Midnight the Blue Hose will hold 
a 30-minule intrasquad scrimmage. Before 
Ihe scrimmage, the PC will have a warm- 
up dunk session. 

People attending the event are 
encouraged to either have group costumes 
or wear their own. Pri/.es will be awarded 
for both group and indi vidual costumes. A 
$MX).(K) pri/e will be given to the group 
with the most spinicd andcreati ve costume. 



A $25 prize will be awarded to the person 
with the be.si individual costume. All 
costumes must be in good taste. 

At halftime of the scnmmagc, three 
people will have a shot at a $5{XX).()0 
giveaway. There will also be free Pepsi 
and popcorn during the event. The 
coaching staff and players encourage 
everyone to come. 



PUBLICSQUARE LAURENS 

INTERVIEW SUITS 

t 

STARTING AT $200 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



SPORTS 




PC's Dec-Dee Williams spikes the ball in a recent confrontation in Templeton Gymnasiam. The Lady Bhte Hose have 

compiled a record of 27 - 5 so far this season. photo by Todd Love 



Intramural 
Notes 



The intramural office would like to 
congratulate the 1992 intramural football 
champions: Men's-Pi Kapf» Phi and 
Women's- Alpha Delta Pi. Jason Humphn^ 
and Malt Glenn led Pi Kappa Phi to a 42-20 
win over Theta Chi in the men's 
championship game. 

In the women's championship game. 
Amy Latiff and Margaret Davis starred as 
Alpha Delta Pi upset defending champ Zeta 
Tau Alpha, 26-8. Some upcoming dates to 
remember are: Oct 30-volleyball rosters 
are due and Nov. 16-^xxts trivia contest 



Women's soccer team finishes season 



hv Amanda Bowers 

STAIT WRITER 

The PC women's soccer team finished 
iLs regular season on October 28 with a 4- 1 
\ iciory over Queens college. Junicx Missy 
Bulier scored two goals for the Lady Blue 
Hose, while sophomore Chnsu Flack and 
ircshman Charily Bra/cal coninbulcd one 

I )ver fall break, the team travelled U) 
Hot a RaU)n, Honda, to play Florida Atianuc 
liniversiiy and Lynn University. They 

MitU'rcd losses 10 both sch<x)ls hv a score of 



2-0. 

Junior co-capiain Kathleen Dowd 
commented about the weekend, saying, "We 
dominated a lot of the play, but we just 
couldn't finish. Overall, it was a good inp. 
We got a lot of kinks worked out before the 
posi-season and raused our level of play, 
which IS what we went to do." 

Dowd weni on to say that she would 
really like loend the post- season by winning 
disuncLs and going on to the regionals. Bui 
she adds. "We are taking it one game at a 
time '■ 







Radio PC 



^'irf 



PC's radio station moves on campus this year 
Broadcasting will begin at 3:00 pm on October 
21 on the PC information channel 




"1^-530 

t/r^lu>rt^olt^cAMA'y(^-C^4tr 
rick m» t% ^pofvioi' il^eefvfv U0ri thC' 



^wu^ 



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^*vc 



A4vMe^\e^ 



JCA. 



^oM niM\^eA^ 



RC. Student 

10% Discount 

Everyday 
Must Show I.D. 
(Excluding Beer) 




1 1 1 Jacobs Hwy, Clinton 

833-5800 

Delivery 

5pm - Closing 



P.C. Night! 

Every Wednesday 
20% Discount 
Must Show I.D. 

(Excluding Beer) 



ENVIRONMENT 



10 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



11 



ENVIRONMENT 



American Wetlands threatened by new definition 



by Kristina Pruitt 

STAFFXWRITCR 



The destruction of the wetlands in the 
United Stales is one of our country 's largest 
environmental concerns. "Wetlands" is a 
term given to a broad group of areas where 
the land meets water-swamps, marshes, 
floodplains, estuaries, barrier beaches, and 
prairie potholes. Each low lying area per- 
forms a different task that is critical in keep- 
ing the environment clean, protecting low 
lying areas from flooding, and protecting 
inland soil and beaches from erosion. This 
complex system also provides diversity 
among many species of plants and animals 
that are dependent upon the wetland habitat 
for survival. 

Environmental experts feel that these 
areas are threatened as a result of the Bush 
Administration's new definition of the term 
"wetland." According to section 404 of the 
Clean Water Act, in order to dredge or fill a 
wetland, a permit must be obtained. In 
1989, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
along with the EPA defined wetlands as 
follows: 



"Those areas that are inundated or satu- 
rated by surface or duration sufficient to 
support, and that under normal circumstances 
do support, a prevalence of vegetation typi- 
cally adapted for life in saturated soil condi- 
tions. Wetlands generally include swamps, 
marshes, bogs, and similar areas." 

This definition brought about protests 
from angry farmers and developers who felt 
that many of the areas included were dry 
nearly all of the time, and that the rules 
infringed on property rights. The Bush 
Administfation proposed that in order for a 
site 10 be considered a wetland it must meet 
the three original requirements: soil, plants, 
and saturation. The area must be .saturated 
to ground level for 21 consecutive days 
during the growing sea.son or completely 
under water for 15 consecutive days. 

EnvinximenialisLs say that this new re- 
quu^ement will be difficult for many wet- 
lands to meet. An example of this is the 
Apalachicola River's floodplain in Florida. 
This flo(xlplain is created by the (lotxls that 
occur six or seven times a year. The flo(xi- 
mg, which flows downstream to the 
Apalachicola Bay, provides the perfect en- 



vironment for shellfish. The river flood 
plain falls under the general term "wet- 
lands," but since the floods do not stay for 1 5 
consecutive days, they are not "wetlands" in 
the political sense of the word. Under the 
current requirements, 35,000 acres of the 
Apalachicola's floodplain is unprotected. 

The Apalachicola is one example of 
how much of the wetlands in the United 
States continue to be unprotected. Annu- 
ally, 250,000 to 5(X),(XK) acres of wetlands 
are lost due to dredging and filling by farm 
crs and developers. The effects of these 
los.ses arc beginning lo be felt by swiety. 
Some examples of major problems caused 
by wetland loss are polluted su-eams and 
rivers, the loss of wildlife (the wetlands are 
home to 150 species of birds, 2(X) types of 
fish, and 1/3 of the plants and animals on the 
U.S. endangered and ihrciitenexj species list), 
and flcxxling due lo the destruction of flcxxi- 
plains by developers and farmers. Environ- 
mentalists ho[)e that some actions will be 
taken to ensure the protection of the wet- 
lands in the future. This is an issue which 
voters .should keep in mind on November 3. 



Recycle PC 
would like 
to welcome 
new mem- 
bers 

Kristina 
Pruitt and 

Suzanne 
Jowers to 
the board. 



Recycling Notice 



by Heather Moncrief 
ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 



Due to decisions made 
by K& W Alloy, necychng on 
the PC campus is being 
changed. K&W Alloy, the 
company which markets our 
recycled materials, has re- 
cently taken over the recy- 
cling programs of L-aurcns and 
Clinton. Items which will be 
accepted by them now cxc lude 
ledger paper. The container 
in SpringsCampusCenier will 
be removed on October 30 
and placed in a computer lab 
on campus to facilitate recycling of com- 
puter paper which will .still be accepted. 
While the Recycle PC board continues to 
research other possibilities, the items which 
can be recycled on campus now are as fol- 
lows: 

Newspaper 
Computer paper 




Soda cans 

Plastics 

Glass 

Correlated Cardboard 

Your participation in the recycling pro- 
gram IS appreciated. Any suggestions are 
gladly received; direct them to Box 974 or 
833-9515. 



WASTED 
YOUTH 




iMOKH I 



A CuNii S#r»ce o« th« USOA Fowsl S*f 
luinl *iui youi SUK Fonttti 



'■iNii TiiU LAN PHLVtNl lUKf-.l MKt 




It's time to elect politicians who really care 
about the environment' 



Seventh Generation 1992 

On November 3rd, the environment 
needs your help. The8,600spcciesofbirds, 
6,(XX) species of mammals, 20,000 species 
of fish, and 250,000 species of plants that 
live on earth can 't decide who conuols their 
late. But you can. 

At every level of government there arc 
}X)iiUcians running for office who support 
su^ong environmental legislation . . . and 
those who don't It's up to us lo recognize 
the difference (which isn't always easy!) 
and elect people who know that a healthy 
environment goes hand in hand with a strong 
economy. 

The future of environmentalle{(islation is 
in your hands. 

This fall the Endangered Species Act 
will come up for reauthorization. Two bills 
have already been introduced that will drd- 
malically affe<;t the Act. One bill would 
sucngthen this important piece of legisla- 
tion. The other would undermine it com- 
pletely. The futureoflhisand other environ- 
mental legislation depends entirely on who 
we put in office on November 3rd. 
Your vote really does make a difTerence. 

Pe rhaps you don ' t thi nk your one , sing le 
vote matters. It does. 



The earth is still a nice place to live .. . let's sponsible candidates. They look beyond the 

keep it that way. rhetoric at v(Xing records and other actions 

Despite human interference, the earth's that are a real gauge of just how "green" 

natural environment is still beautiful and these women and men really are. The League 

wondrous. As the most influential species is here to help you decide who deserves your 



As the most influential species on the 
planet we have the power to destroy 
what's left . . .or take steps to pre- 
serve and restore it. 



on the planet 
we have the 
power to de- 
stroy what's 
left ... or take 
steps to pre- 
serve and re- 
store it. Our 
elected offi- 
cials have more influence than most of us 
about which way the pendulum swings. 
Keeping the earth healthy takes many kinds 
of action. Using environmentally respon- 
sible products is one of them. Voting for 
leaders who give a dam about the environ- 
ment is another. This November 3rd we 
encourage you to use your influence to elect 
City Council Members, State Representa- 
tives, Congressional and Senatorial Repre- 
sentatives who will vote for our envu^on- 
ment.. not again.st it 

Confu.sed about which politicians are re- 
ally green? 

The League of Conservation VotCTS is a 
non-profit organi/alion whose mission is to 
idenufy and support envu^onmentally re- 



vote. We encour- 
age you 10 tap their 
resources . . . and 
to give them your 
support: 

League of Qmser- 
vaiion Voters 
1707 L St. Suite 



550 

Washmgton, DC. 20036 

(202) 785-8683 

* 

Seventh Generation offers over ^00 prod- 
ucts for a healthy planet includiHk- environ- 
mentally safe cleaners, unbleached 100% 
recycled paper goods, energy saving equip- 
ment untreated cotton clothing in classic 
designs, and personal care items. For a 
catalog, send $2 to Seventh Generation. 
Catalog Requests, CoW Chester, Vermont 
05446-1672. 

The Blue Stocking staff called the 
League of Conservation Voters on October 
26. The following stau.stics for South 



Carolina's incumbents were received: 

Ccmgressional Di^ct 1: Arthur Ravenei 

(R)- 69% 

CcHigressional District 2: Floyd SpeB<x 

(R)-6% 

Congressional Distrkt 3: Butler Derrick 

(D)- 44% 

Congressional District 4: Liz Patterson 

(D)- 38% 

Congressional District 5: John Spratt (D)- 

56% 

Congressional District 6: Robin Tallon 

(D)- 25% 

Incumbent Junior Senior from SC: Ernest 

F. Hollings- 42% 

Incumbent Senior Senator from SC: Strom 

Thurmond- 0% 

These percentages are based upcm a scale of 
100 and ranking was based upon the 
individual's »ipport or lack of sif)poii for 
environmental legislation. The only South 
Carolina incumbent candiditfes to have re- 
ceived endorsement from the League of 
Conservation Voters are Arthur Ravenei, 
District 1 , and John Sprau, District 5. When 
asked which presidoitial tk:ket the League 
supports based upon environmental issues, 
the response was the DenKxratic tick^ Bill 
CUntm and AI Gore. 




m 



^gnn 



ENVIRONMENT 



10 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



I RIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1992 



11 



ENVIRONMENT 



American Wetlands threatened by new definition 



by Kristina Pruitt 

STAFPvWRlTER 



The destruction of the wetlands in the 
United States is one of our country's largest 
environmental concerns. "Wetlands" is a 
term given to a broad group of areas where 
the land meets water-swamps, marshes, 
floodplains, estuaries, barrier beaches, and 
prairie potholes. Each low lying area per- 
forms a different task that is critical in keep- 
ing the environment clean, protecting low 
lying areas from flooding, and protecting 
inland soil and beaches from erosion. This 
complex system also provides diversity 
among many species of plants and animals 
that are dependent upon the wetland habitat 
for survival. 

Environmental experts feel that these 
areas are threatened as a result of the Bush 
Administration's new definition of the term 
"wetland." According to section 404 of the 
Clean Water Act, in order to dredge or fill a 
wetland, a permit must be obtained. In 
1989, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
along with the EPA defined wetlands as 
follows: 



"Those areas that are inundated or satu- 
rated by surface or duration sufficient to 
support, and that under normal circumstances 
do support, a prevalence of vegetation typi- 
cally adapted for life in saturated soil condi- 
tions. Wetlands generally include swamps, 
marshes, bogs, and similar areas." 

This definition brought about protests 
from angry farmers and developers who felt 
that many of the areas included were dry 
nearly all of the lime, and that the rules 
infringed on prq)erty rights. The Bush 
Administration proposed thai in order for a 
site to be considered a wetland it must meet 
the three original requirements: .soil, plants, 
and saturation. The area must be .saturated 
to ground level for 21 consecutive days 
during the growing sca.son or completely 
under water for 1 5 coasecutive days. 

Environmcntali.sis say that this new re- 
quirement will be difficult for many wet- 
lands to meet. An example of this is the 
Apalachicola River's flo(xlplain in Rorida. 
This flotxlplain is created by the nixxls that 
occur six or seven times a year. The flcxxl- 
ing, which flows downstream to the 
Apalachicola Bay, provides the perfect en- 



vironment for shellfish. The river flood 
plain falls under the general term "wet- 
lands," but since the Hoods do not slay for 1 5 
consecutive days, they arc not "wetlands" in 
the political sense of the word. Under the 
current requirements. 35,00() acres of the 
Apalachicola's floodplain is unprotected. 

The Apalachicola is one example of 
how much of the wetlands in the United 
Stales continue to be unprotected. Annu- 
ally, 250,(XX) to 5(X),{)(K) acres of wetlands 
are lost due to dredging and filling by farm 
ers and developers. The effects ol these 
losses arc beginning to be felt by .s(x:icty. 
Some examples of major problems caused 
by wetland loss are polluted sueams and 
rivers, the loss of wildlife (the wetlands arc 
home 10 15() species of birds, 2{X) lypcs of 
fish, and 1 /3 of the plants and animals on the 
U.S. endangered and threaiened species I isi), 
and fltxxling due lo the destruction of fliKxl- 
plains by developers and farmers. Environ- 
mcntalisis hope ihai some actions will be 
taken lo ensure the proiauon of the wet- 
lands in the future. This is an issue which 
voters should keep m mind on November 3. 



Recycle PC 
would like 
to welcome 
new mem- 
bers 
Kristina 
Pruitt and 
Suzanne 
Jowers to 
the board. 



Recycling Notice 



by Heather Moncrief 
ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 



Due to decisions made 
by K& W Alloy, recychng on 
the PC campus is being 
changed. K&W Alloy, the 
company which markets our 
recycled materials, has re- 
cently taken over the recy- 
cling programs of Laurens and 
Clinton. Items which will be 
accepted by them nowexcludc 
ledger paper. The container 
in SpringsCanipusCenier will 
be removed on October 30 
and placed in a computer lab 
on campus lo facilitate recycling of com- 
puter paper which will still be accepted 
While the Recycle PC board continues to 
research other possibilities, ihe items which 
can be recycled on campus now are as fol- 
lows: 

Newspaper 
Computer paper 




Soda cans 

Plastics 

Glass 

Correlated Cardboard 

Your participation in ihe recycling pro- 
gram is appreciated. Any suggestions arc 
gladly received; direct them to Box 974 or 
833-9515. 



mnsTED 

YOUTH. 



41 




A f'uWii '*tvir* o) lh« US()* f owjl Set - 
un] i<nd yuui SUM fonstat 



uiMLT ruu LAN t'WVlNI I'.JHLLl HKl 



i tMMIll 



It's time to elect politicians who really care 
about the environment* 



vS«venth (leneration 1992 



On November 3rd, the environment 
needs your help. The 8,600 species of birds, 
6.000 species of mammals, 20,000 species 
of fish, and 250,000 species of plants that 
live on earth can't decide who controls their 
fate. Bui you can. 

At every level of government there are 
poliucians running for office who support 
strong environmental legislauon ... and 
ihose who don't It's up to us lo recc^nize 
the difference (which isn't always easy!) 
and clat people who know that a healthy 
environment goes hand in hand wiih a strong 
economy. 

I hi* future of environmental lef(i.slation is 
in your hands. 

This fall the Endangered Species Act 
will come up for reauthorization. Two bills 
have already been introduced that will dra- 
maucally affect the Act. One bill would 
sucngthcn this important piece of legisla- 
uon. The other would undermine it com- 
pletely. The fulurcoflhisand other environ- 
mental legislauon depends entirely on who 
we pui in office on November 3rd. 
Y(>ur vote really does make a difTerence. 

Perhaps you don'iihink your one, single 
vole matters. It does. 



The earth is still a nice place to live .. . let's 
keep it that way. 

Despite human interference, the earth's 
natural environment is still beautiful and 
wondrous. As the most influential species 
on the planet 
we have the 
power to de- 
stroy what's 
left ... or take 
steps to pre- 
serve and re- 
store it. Our 
elected offi- 



(As the most influential species on the 
planet we have the power to destroy 
what's left . . .or take steps to pre- 
serve and restore it. 



sponsible candidates. They look beyond the 
rhetoric at voting records and other actioiK 
that are a real gauge of just how "green" 
these women and men really are. The League 
is here to help you decide who deserves your 

vote. We encour- 
age you to tap ihcir 
resources . . . and 
to give them your 
support: 



League of Conser- 
vation Voters 
1707 L St, Suite 



cials have more influence than most of us 550 

about which way the pendulum swings. Washington. D.C. 20036 

Keeping ihe earth healthy lakes many kinds (202) 785-8683 



of action. Using environmentally respon- 
sible products is one of them. Voting for 
leaders who give a dam about the envu-on- 
ment is another. This November 3rd we 
encourage you to use your influence to elect 
City Council Members, State Representa- 
tives, Congressional and Senalonal Repre- 
sentatives who will vote for our envu^on- 
ment. notagainsiit 

Confused about which poUticiaDs are re- 
ally green? 

The League of Conservation Voters is a 
non-profit organization whose mission is to 
idenufy and support cnvu-onmenlally re- 



Seventh Generation offers over ^00 prod- 
ucts for a healthy planet includiHk' cnvirwi- 
menially safe cleaners, unbleached 100% 
recycled paper goods, energy saving equip- 
ment unueated cotton clothing in classic 
designs, and personal care items. For a 
catalog, send $2 to Seventh Generation. 
Catalog Requests, Coki Chester, Vermont 
05446-1672. 

The Blue Stocking staff called the 
League of Conservation Voters on October 
26. The following staustics for South 



Carolina's incumbents were received: 

Congressional District 1: Arthur Ravend 

(R)- 69% 

Congressional District 2: Floyd Spencc 

OR)- 6% 

Congressional Distrk;i 3: Butler Derrick 

(D)- 44% 

Congressional District 4: Liz Patterson 

(D)- 38% 

Congressional District 5: John Spratt (D)- 

56% 

Congressional District 6: Robin TaDon 

(D)- 25% 

IncumbentJunior Senator from SC: Ernest 

F. Hoiiings- 42% 

Incumbent Senior Senator from SC: Strom 

Thurmond- 0% 

These percentages are teised upon a scale (rf 
100 and ranking was based upon the 
individual's support or lack of support for 
environmental legislation. The only South 
Cittolina incumbent candidates to have re- 
ceived endorsement from the League oi 
Conservation V(Hcrs are Arthur Ravenel 
District 1 , and John Spratt, District 5. When 
asked whkh presi(fential ticket the League 
supports based upon environmental issues, 
the respcmx was the Democraic ucket. Bill 
Cbnton and Al Gore. 




Michael "The Paleo 




Join us in an expedition in time, back to 65 million years ago in the 
Northern Great Plains. Camp in the Badlands, search for and dig fossiia, 
explore the plant and animal ecology of the shortgrass prairie, drink 
"cowboy" coffee! This trip will change the way you look at lime, the 
way you look the land and this country, and perhaps, the way you look 
at youreelf. Three houra credit . Open to all students, although the 
faint-hearted are encouraged to look at other, less thrilling course*. 

Oiganizatiottal/information meeting - November 5,7PM R-207 



-ladiaat Joh»" !•••■ 




ENTERTAINMENT 



12 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30. 1992 



Company to perform 
in Edmunds Hall 



Comedian to bring show to campus 

Jonathan Solomon's act called 'fast moving' 




The Chestnut Brass Company will be performing in Kdmunds Hall on November 
19 at 8:15 pm. file photo 

Philadelphia band to perform at PC 



by Brian Sacco 
STAFF WRITER 

Described as "versatile and unpredict- 
able" by the Philadelphia Inquirer, the 
Chestnut Brass Company from Philadel- 
phia will perform at Edmunds Hall on No- 
vember I9lhat8:15p.m. 

The Chesuiut Brass Company pcr- 
f(MTns with 150 different insuuments and 
plays music from the Middle Ages to Con- 
temporary Jazz. Their musical diversity 
should provide the audience with a sample 
to appeal to every taste. This musical quin- 
tet has been featured on National Public 
Radio's "Performance Today" program, 
"Voice of America," and Bavarian Slate 
Radio. 

The Chesmut Bra,ss Company tours 
throughout the United Slates, while partici- 



by Camisha Clarke 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

"If men could have babies, you could 
get an abortion at Woolworth's by now. 
Women should pass laws about what men 
could do with their bodies," says comedian 
Jonathan Solomon while imagining a law 
limiting where men can scratch themselves. 

From the moment Solomon steps onto 
the stage and takes the mic, the cleverness of 
his material Ls the powerful force that makes 
the audience laugh. Some comedians lower 
themselves by using obscenities to get easy 
laughs, and some others even attack their 
audience with rock-hard punch lines and 
"dry comedy." Then there's Solomon, who 
simply takes his time and delivers thought- 
ful comedy while trusting that clcveme^ss in 
his material. 

The range of subjects in his material 
even offers advice on everything from how 
to make a fortune in cash by ju.si visiting 
your Grandmother to how to look cool at the 
mall when you arc fourteen. 

Ahhh... fourteen. Those were the days 
when "you're starling to worry about the 
way you look and at the same time you're 
starting to look really bad," reminisces 
Solomon. He recalls how he used to be 
agonizingly embarrassed by his parents as a 
teenager, but now "they're cute. They're 
like hamsters." His comedy act humorously 
incorporates how our view of our parents 
changes over time. 

Solomon handles the more serious sub- 
jects with the same thoughtfulncss. He uses 
humor to bring attention to these subjais by 
delivering sharp commentary without 
sounding shrill. Homelessness, AIDS re- 
search, and abortion laws are only a few 
examples of this subject matter. 



paling in over one hundred workshops dur- 
ing the year. Selec ted as "OuLsiandmg Young 
Artists to Watch" by Musical America, the 
Company is composed of musicians Bruce 
Barrie and Thomas C(X)k on the trumpet, 
Manan Hesse on the French horn, Larry 
Zimmerman on the trombone, and Jay Krush 
on the tuba. 

Reviewer Dr. Earle L. Louder of the 
Morehead News said of the Chestnut Brass 
Company, "The ensemble performed not 
only a very musically satisfying concert, but 
one that was educational and entertaining." 

The group, founded in 1977, mixes iLs 
own innovative music with standard sets of 
music and is culturally enriching becau.se of 
its experience and diversity. 



Although Solomon's name is not yet a 
familiar one, many have faith that Solomon 
will get the recognition he deserves in the 
future. He continues to headline many major 
comedy clubs all over the country and to 
make television appearances on some 
popular comedy specials, including VH-I, 
Showtime. The MTV Half Hour Comedy 
Hour. Star Search, and, MTVs Comedy 
Special from Pepperdine University. He has 
also hosted MTV 's hip video morning show, 
"Awake on the Wild Side." 

Wait! He may have entertained the 
audiences of television, but can he satisfy a 
live, college audience? Well, the Student 
Activities Board of the University of Wis- 
consin says that Solomon has a genuine 
interest in the students on campus. 

Gary Kocncn of this university ex- 
claimed, "Not only was his show hilarious, 
but he was able to transform a potential 
technical disa.stcr into an entertaining part of 
his show." 

Joy Hopkins, advisor of the Student 
Activities Board of the University of West 
Rorida, al.so promoted Solomon's talent: 
"He played to a packed house and was on 
.stage for almost two hours. It was unbeliev- 
able that an audience would sit for that long 
and listen to one person. I think it's a 
definite staiementabout the talent of Jonathan 
Solomon." 

There is no question why the New York 
Post calls Solomon "one of the hardest 
working and best comedians around." 

Jonathan Solomon will be performing 
livcinSpringsCampusCentcrat7:(X)pmon 
Tuesday, November 10. Don't miss this 
"fast moving show." 



SUB to feature Lethal Weapon 3 



by Kim Rabon 

ST AFT WRITER 

Sequels. The sight of the word is 
enough to make some people cringe. Most 
sequels fail at \rymg to extend the storyline 
and keeping the viewers' attention. As for 
being another dull, boring repetitive sequel, 
"Lethal Weapon 3" is a denniie exception. 

As seen in "Lethal Weapon 1" and 
"Lethal Weapon 2," Riggs (Mel Gibson) 
and Murtaugh (Danny Glover) arc detective 
partners that have found themselves in one 
predicament alter another. The duo's ad- 
ventures ctwitmue m "Lethal Weapon 3," 
directed by Richard Donner. At the begin- 
ning of the movie, Murtaugh decides he 
will be retiring and Riggs begins to plan 
ways to get Murtaugh to reconsider. 
Murtaugh is hesitant to enter any case be- 
cause his retirement date is fast approach- 
ing, but Riggs gets involved in an ^cident 
on the sucetand ultimately volunteers them 
both for a ca.sc. The case on which the 
movie is based addresses the problems of 
gang violence and the distribution of illegal 



weapons. These themes are portrayed in m 
emotional scene when a friend of 
Murtaugh 's son is killed in a gang raid and 
again in the de.struction of the fortress city 
the warlord built. "Lethal Weapon 3" 
brilliantly displays action and humor, while 
at the same umc it sends the viewer a 
message. 

Leo Getz (Joe Pesci) returns again in 
"Uthal Weapon 3" and continues to add 
undeniable humor to the big screen. The 
cast come U)geiher to form the ultimate 
movie with 3 times the excitement, 3 times 
the acuon. and 3 times the laughs! "Lethal 
Weapon 3" is by far the best of the thrw: 
movies and stand out in my mind as one of 
the best movies ever. 

The Student Union Board will be 
showing "lethal Weapon 3" in Springs 
Campus Center on Friday, November 1 3th 
at lit) p.m As always, the movie is free of 
charge, socome out ahd enjoy a night at the 
movies. 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVII Number 4 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way. " 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE CHnton. South Carolina 29325 



Friday. November 20. 1992 




SC tuition grant cuts expected 



On The Inside 



Page 4 . . . 

Accusations against Food Lion 
could result in U'ouble for SAC- 
8 tournament sponsorships. 

Page 6 . . . 

Bronze Derby Thanksgiving 
tradition comes to an end at 
Presbyterian College. 

Page 11... 

SUB's Reggae Fest proves to be 
another success. 



bv Jason West 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

If you are a PC student from South 
Carolina and depend on the South Carolina 
TuilionGraniio help with ihecost of col lege, 
you can expect changes next year. 

According to Judi Gillespie, PC's 
financial aid director, the South Carolina 
TuiUon Grant Commission has approved 
plans that will rcsu-ucture the way grants are 
distribuieil U) students - a decisKXi that will 
effect K!) pi'rcent of K"s South Carolina 
students. 

"The tuition grant program was 
ongmally designed to help offset the cost of 
private colWge to citi/ens of South Carolina 
by providing a family with 4 1 .,*i peaent of 
tuition cost of any private school in the 
state," said Gillespie. "The grant program 
was based on a first come, first serve basis. 
In other words, there was only so much 
money available, and the first people to 
apply were the ones to receive the grants. 
Students could receive any amount fa>m 
5^850 on down." 

However, in recent years, Gillespie 
reports that the grant program has found 
Itself w ith less and less money and more and 
more ilemands. In fact, the funding for this 
academic year was depleted as of March s. 



1992. 

"There has been a great deal of concern 
about the grant program funding less 
students. As a result, the Commission has 
decided to extend the application deadline 
for the tuition grant for the next academic 
year U) June 30. 1993 and all who apply by 
that date will be funded." said Gillespie. 

According to Gillespw, this new policy 
will probably result in a "watering down" of 
the tuition grant program. 'The purpose of 
the tuition grant was to give students a 
choice . It was designed to be an equali^auon 
grant to equalize private and public 
education," she said. 

Gillespie indicates that some students 
may find that their grant could be reduced by 
SHXX) or more. In addition, students and 
parents will not know the exact amount of 
their grant until September or (Xtober. 

"A lot of students will lose money and 
some are going to have to go to public 
st htx)ls because they can no longer afford 
private education." added Gillespie. 

"My biggest fear is that the stale will 
reven to giving a grant to every student in 
South Can)lina. whether they attend private 
or public sch(X>ls." said Gillespie 



Disturbance at 
MSU party leads 
to 5 arrests 

by Tobin Turner 

STAF"F WRITER 

A Minority Student Union party, 
held on November 7 at Douglas House, 
turned out to be anything but a time of 
social fellowship, as Public Safely and 
the Clinton Police Department were 
forced to make five arrests within an 
hour. None ofthose arrested, however, 
were PC students. 

The trouble began at approximately 
10:00 pm when Willie Payne of Clinton 
and three juveniles were refused 
admittance to the party. TT^y were 
subsequenUy asked by the secunty 
officer at the door to leave the party. 
Ten minutes later the officer reported 
being hassled by the males and called 
for assistance. 

Two additional Public Safety 
officers arrived at Douglas House, again 
asking the four individuals to leave the 
premises and informing them that failure 
to comply would result in their arrests 
for trespassing. 

After leaving for several minutes, 
the officers returned to the party and 
found the group loitering around Bailey 
Dorm. The four individuals were 
apprehended by Clinton Police and 
transported to jail. 

An hour later Public Safety was 
again called to the party. The officer 
working the door of the party was 
notificdofadisturbance inside Douglas 
House. Christopher Peakc, also of 
Clinton, was seen breaking out a 
window. As the parly cleared, several 
small altercations involving shouts and 
abusive language occurred outside the 
building. 

Emmett Stroud of Benton, 
Louisiana, then proceeded to break a 
second window. Peake was charged 
with disorderly conduct and malicious 
injury to personal property. A warrant 
has been issued for Sidney Speaks of 
Cross Hill, SC, for hispart in the episode. 
The judge hearing the cases came 
down sternly on both Payne, who 
received the maximum fine of $248. 
and Peake. who also received the 
maximum fine along with a $100 
restitution fee for the baikcn windows. 
The three juveniles will ai:^ar in Family 
Court at a later date. 

Chief Circy Mayson was in full 
support of the court's stiff penalties, 
stating. "MSU itself wasn't guilty of 
anything but trying to ha\^ a nice party." 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



Professor proposes a 'freshman to senior care' grading policy 



by Jody Lipford 

GUEST WRITER 

At long last the election is over 
and Bill Clinton is our new presi- 
dent. His presidency marks the end 
of Republican dominance of the 
White House, adominance that lasted 
twenty-four years. (Pardon me for 
overlooking the Watergate-induced 
fluke of 1976.) Will Mr. Clinton be 
a "typical" Democrat in the tradition 
of Roosevelt, Kennedy, and Johnson? 
I don't know. But in keeping with 
the spirit of the new Democratic re- 
gime, I propose the following policy 
for Presbyterian College: a points 
tax and redistribution scheme. 

As all of us know, teachers and 
students alike, there is a wide dispar- 
ity of abihty and performance among 
students, this inequity is most un- 
fair and unfortunate, doubtless cre- 
ating class strife between poor stu- 
dents and "curve-blowers." My 
proposal would carry us some dis- 
tance in rectifying these problems by 
providing a more egalitarian grade 
distribution. By taxmg passing stu- 
dents and redistributing these points 
to faihng students, we could provide 
a "safety net" and "freshman to senior 
care" for all students. 

Consider my two Econ 201 
classes. Although 1 have been im- 



pressed with the quality of these stu- revise all students' grades to at least 

dents, especially as evidenced by their a 60. 

questions, comments, and effort, the With a little work on a sprcad- 

(combined) class average was only sheet, I found that this scheme would 

68.2 with a number of F"'s. In an yield 61. 6 taxable points to rcdisirib- 

effort to aid the less fonunate stu- ute. I immediately subtracted 1 .6 



"All 'A's, equality, and harmony among stu- 
dents and faculty alike. Wouldn't PC he a 
happy place?" 



dents, 1 propose adjusting the grades 
in the following way. A progressive 
tax schedule that taxes points be- 
tween 60 and 70 at a 10 percent rate, 
points between 70 and 80 at a 20 
oercent rate, points between 80 and 
90 at a 30 percent rate, and points in 
excess of 90 at a 40 percent rate 
would be used to raise points for 
redistribution. Failing students 
would, of course, not be taxed. Then, 
these taxed points could be used to 



points from this total to cover the 
adminisiraliveco.sts of redistribution. 
1 then began alkx'ating points to fail 
ing students, giving each failing stu- 
dent enough points to reach a grade 
of 60. This tax and redistribution 
program eliminated all "A'"s and 
reduced the standard deviation in the 
class from 13.9 to 9.7, a marked 
movement towards equality! 

Nevertheless, because of a few 
very low grades, 1 was not able to 



rai.se every student to a grade of 60. 
While lamenting this situation to a 
colleague, I was reminded of the 
Republican legacy: deficit finance. 
But why borrow the few points 
needed to raise my weakest students' 
scores to a mere 60? By borrow- 
ing 763 points from future stu- 
dents yet to enroll at PC, I could 
eive everyone an "A." What could 
r>e better! Oh yes, I know that one 
day I'd have to stand before my 
students and tell them that they 
must all pay, say, a 20 point sur- 
charge to finance the "A'"s of 
previous graduates. But maybe 
that day can be deferred. Who 
knows, maybe with a little luck we 
could deter this day indefinitely 
by borrowing points from 
Wot'ford, Newberrv, or some other 
neighboring schcK)f. 

Who could object to this pro- 
posal'.' Poor students would gradu- 
ate with highCiPA's. "Curve-blow- 
ers" need not fear the envv or disdain 
of pcx)rer students. Faculty need not 
face the lobbying efforts of students 
arguing forextranointson discussion 
questions. All A"'s. equality, and 
hannony among students and faculty 
alike. Wouldn't PC be a happy place? 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



NEWS 




The final edition of the Blue Stocking this semes- 
ter will be published on December 4, 1992. Any- 
one wishing to write a letter to the editor must do 
so by Monday, November 30, 1992. Letters to the 
editor must be signed by the author. The editor 
reserves the right to edit for grammatical pur- 
poses and space limitations. The staff encourages 
students to express their opinions. 




The Blue Slocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVII, Number 4 
November 20, 1992 



Editor in-Chief. Jason West 

Managing Editor LxJeanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichacl 

Sports Editor Evcrette Catls 

Entertainment Editor Camisha Clarke 

Feature Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather MoncTief 

Photography EdiUw Kim Ciibson 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



Advertising Editor Ann Mayficld 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Muon 

Artist Michael Christenscn 

Photography Staff 
Kimberlee Gibson TocW Love 

Staff Writers 

Eli/iibcthCunard Amanda Bowers 

Leigh Heamburg Kalhcrine Bonner 

Kristma Pruitl Cher Fulbright 

Paula Warren Michelle Cantey 

Brian Sacco Shelly Phipps 

Kim Rabon Jamcy Pate 

Tobin Turner Tonya Snead 



I he Blue Stocking is a in wcikly Mudcnl publi 

cation of PrcsbyicnanCollege, The pa|x.-r serves 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional arKJ 
national concern. For advertising, contact I he 
Blue St(M lung. Presbyterian College, Box 1()6] 
Clinton, SC 293 2.V The Blue Stmking wel- 
comes letters to the editor from all mc-mhers of 
the PC communily. Signaiiues are required 
Utters are printed on a space available basis. 
The Blue Stinking reserves the right u. edit all 
letters for projicr grammar and |iunaua!ion 
The final deadlmc for submitting letters is Fri 
day at 12;(K)pm()n the week before publication 




Faculty and staff express opinions concerning religion requirement 



bv Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 



In a previous issue of the Blue Stocking, 
an article appeared on the history of 
church-related colleges and the 
reasoning behind PC's faculty religion 
requirement. Presbyterian College has 
long followed a policy of only hiring 
faculty members who profess to be a 
member of a Christian church. 

In this issue, current faculty and 
staff members offer their opinions on 
the matter of a faculty religion 
requirement. 

In support of the requirement for 
professors to be members of a Christian 
church. President Kenneth B. Orr said, 
"It is in harmony with the mission of the 
school" and with "the foundation set up 
by members ofthePresbytenan Church, 
who dedicated their entire lives to the 
college." 

Senior Vice-President of Academic 
Affairs Bill Moncricf agreed with Orr. 
*' I don't feel that it is a destructive 
rcquircmeni, and it is necessary to still 
maintain the same identity (of PC)," he 
said. 'There are arguments for both 
sides, but we have a strong faculty fn)m 
various situations and experiences who 
are liberal in the best sense of the word. 



who know what they believe and are 
knowledgeable." 

Peter Hobbie, professor of religion 
and philosophy, also supports the 
requirement, believing that it stresses "a 
community sense of Christianity by a 
desire to do things for students and others 
in a sense of kindness." 

"The college docs not limit or 
restrict my teaching. I am allowed to 
give a liberal, unbiased view tomy class. 
I am nol limiting my students in any 
way," added Hobbie. 

Though professors are not restricted 
in their teaching at all, Orr, the Board of 
Trustees, and a selcctgroupof professors 
do not agree with having a Mormon, 
Jew, or any otlier non-Christian on the 
faculty. 

"With SOOliberal arts colleges, there 
is a wealth of choice; this is what is great 
about America. This iasti tution is unique 
because of its liberal education within a 
Christian context. It is not all things to 
all people. If this is offensive to you. 
then you ought to go elsewhere," said 
Ort. 

Moncricf expressed his belief that 
PC is set apart from ordinary liberal arts 
colleges by its main goal. "PC is in both 



worids and understands the realities of 
the real world yet maintains positive 
Christian ideas. This is what bridges the 
gap," he said. 

In opposition to the Christian 
requirement, many professors cite the 
need to be more tolerant of other 
religions. 

Booker Ingram, professor of 
political science, says, "This separation 
is somewhat problematic and loo narrow 
of a definition of Christianity." 

Tom Weaver, professor of pwlitical 
science and the first Catholic p)ermitted 
to teach at PC, agrees and stresses that 
the requirement could be much better 
written. He suggests revising it to require 
"an appreciation of Christian values" 
but not necessarily mandating one to be 
a Christian. 

He continues, "This would rule out, 
for example, an atheist who could 
possibly come in arxl do harm to the 
students and college," he said. 

Terry Barr, English professor, also 
expressed his reservation about the 
requirement. "I find it hard to believe 
that my father, who is hardworking, 
open-minded, and has a wonderful heart, 
and whom 1 respect very much, would 



not be able to get a job (teaching) at PC 
because he is Jewish." 

"PC is much more tolerant than a 
Bob Jones," added Ban". "We should 
still continue to become more and more 
tolerant to better understand other 
viewpoints. One atheist in our midst 
could in no way undermine such a strong 
foundation." 

The individuals who are in favor of 
the requirement believe it is in line with 
the history of Presbyterian College and 
that the removal or revision of the 
requirement could demise the 
uniqueness of PC's goal to provide a 
liberal education within a Christian 
environmnent. 

Those who oppose the requirement 
believe that changing the policy would 
be a step forward for Christianity, in that 
Christians need to continue being more 
open-minded and tolerant of all people. 
In the process, it would improve PC by 
allowing more diverse professors who 
were experts in their fields and who 
would help students leamto accept views 
and visions of all people, as we move 
into aless restrictive, more tolerant world 
community. 



lEED A HERD OF 
PAIMY ANIMALS, 




Building From Strength Campaign 

Board celebrates $38 million success 



Make your bash a smash with a Subway Party Sub or Party Platter 

You tell us how long you want your Party Sub — and we'll make it 

And we'll stuff your Party Platter with your favorite subs — 

sliced in tasty 4" portions. Call Subway and make plans for 

your party Big plans. 

988 E. Carolina Ave., Clinton, SC 29325 

833-2582 




Press Release 

OFHCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The ambitious "Building From 
Strength" fund-raising campaign at 
Presbyterian College, begun in March of 
1988. came to an official close Thursday 
night with the announcement that the $30 
million goal had been exceeded by nearly 30 
percent. 

PC trustee Wilson Weam. chairman 
emeritus of Multimedia Inc. in Greenville, 
SC, who served as chairman of the five-year 
fund drive, revealed toacelebraiion banquet 
audience that the campaign had raised $38, 
495, 697. 

"While the impact of this fund-raising 
drive has been much more dramatic than 
dollars alone, we certainly don't want to 
minimi/c the extraordinary importance of 
these new funds for Presbytcnan College," 
Weam said. "Someone once said. 'A team 
that dtx'sn'i ke^p score is only practicing.' 
Well, hclicvc mc, this camj^ign team has 
not just been practicing, and we've kept 
score all along the way. This final score 
indicates that Prcsbytenan College is indwd 
a winner " 

The Building From Strength Campaign 
touched every constituent group of PC, 
including the Boanlof Tnislccs. which raised 
$6million fmm wiihin iLs40- member board; 
the Board of Visitors, which raised $1 
million; faculty and staff, the Presbyterian 



Church (USA) congregations in South 
Carolina and Georgia; the 6,000-plus alumm; 
and fnends in the local Laurens County 
community. 

By the time the campaign had 
concluded. 722 volunteers had received gifts 
from 6,8 18 different donors. Inclu(kdinthe 
conuibutions were 74 gifts over $100,000. 
21 gifts over $500,000, and 1 1 gifts over $1 
million. Dunng the past five years of the 
campaign, PC has constructed six new 
buildings, has added nearly $14 millicm to 
the scholarship fund, has doubled the overall 
endowment of the college to more than $36 
million, has increased the facuhy by 2S 
percent, and has increased enrollment by 23 
percent, including this year's record student 
body of 1,167. 

"We have much to cetebraic and be 
thankful for today at Prcsbytenan College," 
President Kenneth B Or said dunng the 
ce Ic bra tuw banquet, which Nought together 
members ol the Board of Trustees, the Board 
of Visitors, the Alumni Beard of Dirattws. 
and campaign volunleers."Thcse have been 
extraordinary years by any measure " 

Keynote speaker for the landmark 
meeting of the college's boirds was CD. 
Sprangler, president of the University of 

North Carolina system 



NEWS 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



POLITICS 



Food Lion's problems could spell trouble for SAC-8 sponsorship 



by Kim Rabon 

STAFF WRITER 

Food Lion, Inc., America's fastest 
growing supermarket chain and the 
corporate sponsor for the South Atlantic 
Conference, has been trying to recover from 
allegations of unsanitary conditions in their 
stores and allegations of child labor law 
violations. 



Last week, ABC's Prime Time Live 
ran a story in which one of the show's 
producers gained employment at a Fcxxl 
Lion store in Salisbury, North Carolma 
and obiamed footage bringing a total of 14 
charges against the corporation. Charges 
included uncleanliness in the meat and deli 
departments, improper procedures handlmg 
meat.and ineffective schcdulingof workers. 

Fo(xl Lion President Tom E. Smith 
responded, "Food Lion stores are clean. We 



meet all food cleanliness and handling laws 
inall 14.siiitcswhcrc wedo business. Pnnw 
Time Live hascrc;ilcd phony charges without 
facts in an effort to embarrass us, scare our 
customers, and drive us to a wall. It is not 
fair to a g(xxl company which provides 
60,0(K) Amcncan jobs, and wc resent ii." 
F(xxl Lion is al.so being charged by the 
United States Deparmieni of Labor with 
child labor law violations. The charges are 
related to 16and 17 year-old workers placing 




ortunities Come 
mall Colleges. 




PROUD SPONSOR FOR ALL 

FOOD LION/SOUTH ATLANTIC CONFERENCE 

TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIPS! 



cardboard m non-operating bailers, which 
IS illegal. The company claims that these 
charges are false because no one under 1 8 is 
allowed U) place cardboard in the machines 
and younger employees are made aware of 
this policy before starting work. 

"We have always been concerned with 
the safety of our young workers. We have 
considered not hiring workers under 1 8, but 
we believe teenagers should have the 
opportunity tt) ga)w and learn while on the 
job," said Smith. 

Smith indicates that Food Lion has 
prepared a list of charges made by ABC and 
a list ot responses to each charge. 
( onsumers are being urged to call or wntc 
tor a copy. 

Since F(Mxi Lion is the corporate 
s[H)nsi)r for SACS athletic conference 
lournameni championships, and since 
i'lesbyterian College is a member of the 
SAC-8, the allegations of child labor 
Molations and unclcaniness have the 
[xik-iuia! U) allect the college. 

ItxKl Lion has definitely helped out 
l'< .IS well as the other teams in the 
cunlcrence," said ('ally Gaull, athletic 
director. "Fivoryonc should hear both suks 
ol the siory k'lorc making up their minds." 

I (Kxl Lion officials have assured SAC- 
■ members thai the allegations have not yet 
al lee tod iheir corporate sponsorship of 
louriuuncni championships. However, 
i )tficals warn thai i f consumers believe lhe.sc 
allegation, stcx-ks could drop and spending 
cuts by the company could result. 




Residence halls to shut down during break 



Thanksgiving Break officially begins 
at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, November 25, 
and classes will resume the following 
Monday, November 30. Greenville Dining 
Hall will serve the noon meal on November 
25 and will be closed until the dinner meal 
on Sunday, November 29. 

The residence halls will close at 7:00 
pm Thursday, November 26, and re -open at 
2:00 pm, Sunday, November 29. The 
women's residence halls and houses will be 
electronically locked on Wednesday. 
November 25 at 5:00 pm. If ytni would like 
to .stay in your room over the Thanksgiving 
holidays, you mu.st see Andy Alti/.eror Mrs. 
Burrissinihe Student Affairs Office, Women 
staying must ensure that their key card is 
added to the computer system; otherwi.se, 
their card will not let them enter their 
residence haJl. Men requesting to stay must 



pick up a front door key to their residence 
hall and sign a special contract regarding the 
u.sc of this key. 

Holidays are frequently times when 
items are stolen out of student rooms, .so 
make a conscious effort to kxk your room 
and tothnx)m if y(xj live in a suite. It is also 
a good idea, if you have not alre^Mly done so, 
to participate in Project ID, 

Project ID is a citizens' burglary 
prevention program. Students mark [)roperty 
with an identifying number and then list the 
make and senal number of those items. 
Marking property discourages theft becau.se 
easily- idenufied property is hard fora burglar 
to .sell. An inventory provides easy access to 
the make and serial number to a.ssist law 
enforcement in r(xovery. Contact PC's 
Public Safety Office for more mlormation. 

Have a sale Thanksgiving holiday! 



The Blue Stocking staff wishes everyone a 
Happy IhankSgiring! 



IS NOT A GAME 

DON'T 

turn it into 

a game 

of chance 



Broder address concludes Russell Pix«raiii's 'Election '92' series 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

The third and final installment of the 
"Election '92" series was given this week in 
Belk Auditorium. David Broder spoke to a 
crowd of PC students and faculty , as well as 
local residents, atl 1:00 on Tuesday. He 
gave what was described asa"post-mortem" 
on the national elections: his evaluation of 
them and some themes on the current 
political landscape. 

Brtxler spoke about a pair of articles to 
which heconuibuted which were published 
last year in the Washinffion Post. For these 
articles, six reporters went to vanous parts 
of the country in order to interview people 
about the election. Brcxler said that there 
were two prevailing themes in the people's 
responses. One was that "the voters took 
the '92 election very seriously." The voters 
knew by that point, according to Broder, 
that the Cold War was over. He explained, 
"The American people finally said. This 
enormous confrontation ... is finally over. 
We won. Our values prevailed, and now we 
finally move on to another period." In this 
new era, the voters also understood that 
"something more basic and more frightening 
was taking place" m the economy, Broder 
.said. 

The second mapr theme expressed by 
the people interviewed was that there is a 
"deep dismay and disuust of political 
institutions." Therefore, he concluded that 
"the voters are the ones who really . . . were 
in control of the dynamics of this election." 
As an example of this fact, Broder mentioned 
the candidacy of Sen. Paul Tsongas. 
Tsongas had written a book about his plans 
- "something substantive" about the 
economy - and "the pa)ple, to our surprise, 
snatched them up," 

Brogan said that the voters "wanted U) 
hear it straight." and that it "was not an 
accident that this was the year of the talk 
show." He also said that the "Perot 
Phenomenon" was an indicauon of "the 
voters leading the elation." 

BriKler said there were four important 
facets of this year's election. 'The first and 
most important thing is that the voters 
showed up in rixord numbers," he said, 
reversing the "dt)wnward la-nd" in recent 
years. He added that this reversal shows 
that the people believe "there is still some 
importance and credibility in the political 
process." 

Broder pointed out that, since President 
Eisenhower, "only Ronald Reagan has 
served out two full tcnns," He also said that 
every president since Eisenhower served in 
World War Two. "Now we have enu-usted 
the leadership of this country in two men - 
Bill Clinton and Al Gore - who were not 
shaped by World War Two and the post-war 

IKTiod," 

The third important result of this election 
is the "changed Congress. 1 iK-re arc 110 
new members of the House ol 
Repre.senuUives. the largest freshman class 
since before the war. he said. He went on 
to point out that "now 5^ women are m the 



House," as are a much larger number of but finally predicted Govemor Clinton, 

minority representatives and the first Native- "Bill Clinton quickly became a leader of 

Amencan. The voters, Broder said, have the National Governors' Conference, which 

"ended the deadlock in Washington" by meets twice annually." Broder said. "He 




Washington Post columnist David Broder speaks at Tuesday's convocatioii. Broder 
offered his perspective on the recent presidential eintion. potato by Km Gibson 



electing a Demcxrauc president akxig with a 
Democratic congress. 

The fourth major result ot this election, 
according to Brixk-r, is how the voters icx)k 
control of the election prcxcss. He said, 
"Fourteen states voted on term limits, and 
they passed in all 14 And one out of five 
voters said no to both piiriies " This election, 
he said, had ihe sUiMigest showing for a third 
party candidate since 1912, "The voters are 
saying. 'You are there on probation; we are 
keeping an eye on you,"' 

On I'resKlent elect Bill CImton. Brcxler 
said that he first met him in 1978. when 
Clinton was 32 and the newly-elected 
Govemor of Arkansas Bnxler did a story on 
the "New Generation" of elected officials. 
Uter, when Parade Ma^iazine inUrrviewed 
Brotler, they asked him wh») would be the 
first Pn^sident of the US out of this new 
generation He tried to avoid the question 



was never in his seal for more than a minute 
at a ume. ClinU)n was working that group 
of politicians harder than I've ever seen a 
poliucian work. He became a real player in 
changing not only state policy but national 
policy as well." Broder added that Clinton 
IS "wonderfully skilled at building 
coalitions." As an example, he cited the 
Demtxrauc National Convention, during 
which Clinton successfully "brought 
togetlier the different factions of the 
DcnuKratic ?arty" 

Brixler said that he would "venture two 
principles" for which he believes Clinton 
will work the hardest. The first deals with 
race relauons, "The idea of racial equality 
iuiddesegregauon is very important to him." 
Bnxler said The second is "something that 
I have heard him talk about with passion ; 
that IS, education itself," Brtxler added, "I 
think that jClmion | beliovesediK alion is the 



key to making this nation strong." Broder 
also said that he thought the Clinton 
Administration "is going lobe an iniCTesling 
administration and - with fingers crossed - a 
hopeful one." 

Broder then opened the floor for a few 
questiOTs. The first one was from a student 
who asked what problems, and what benefits, 
can result from a Democratic Congress and 
President. Broder replied that "the biggest 
benefit is knowing that one set of politicians 
can be held accountable ... for the problems 
of the next admimsu^ation." Anything they 
did would be tempered by the fact that they 
have the responsibility, he said. "The federal 
budget deficit is one thing that no one took 
responsibility for," he added. "Now all of 
them come to Washington with the 
knowledge that they are there on probaiiwi. 
They have to improve upon the work of the 
people who came before tl^m," or they will 
not be able to return. 

Another person asked about the role of 
the "Religious Right" in the GOP. Broder 
said that was "something we have to do 
more reporting on," before a good answer 
can be given. However, he did say. "1 think 
over the next four years we will see an 
intense - and I think a pretty healthy - debate 
on the direction of the Republican Party." 
He said that the definition of conservatism 
will be reformed to accommcxlate the various 
factions within the i»rty. 

When next asked if he thought that 
Bush'snegativecampaignmgbroughtabout 
his defeat, Broder replied, "My own sense is 
that President Bush ' s cause was lost over the 
last two years rather than over the campaign. 
George Bush." he said. "was. in my 
vie w, a very effective leader in the ckwing of 
the CoM War, up to. and including, the Gulf 
War." He then said that Bush did not use his 
"commanding poliucal position" with the 
Congress, "and opportunities were tost." 
Broder added. "The inability to change from 
the Cold War to (tomesuc polky cost George 
Bush the election." 

When asked about the effects of term 
limits for Congressmen. Broder said that 
they "could change the whole .senioniy 
system" of Congress. He also said, "I have 
very senous doubts about term limits as the 
solution to the problems [in WashmgttMi)." 
He finished by saying that perhj^)s it would 
be better to change the camf«ign financing 
laws or to m.siall "a system of public 
financing that would give incumbents and 
challengers roughly equal amounts of 
morwy." 

Broder is an associate ethtor and national 
poliucal corrcspt)ndent for The Washinpon 
^05/. and his bi-weekly column IS picked up 
by over 300 foreign and domestic 
newspapers. He has also worked for the 
Congressiontd Quarterly, The Washinpon 
5/^ir, and The New York Times, and in 1973 
he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize f« 
Distinguished Commentary. Broder came 
to PC as a result ol the work of Dr. Jim 
Skinner and the support of the Russell 
Program, in cooperation with the Cultural 
Ennchnoent Program, 



. 



FEATURES 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



FEATURES 



Blue Hose fans bid farewell to Thanksgiving tradition 




Blue Hose Head Football Coach John Perry shows off the coveted Bronze Derby. 
The final Bronze Derby Thanksgiving game will be next Thursday. 

^ photo by Kim Gibson 



Good News 

in a hundred 

words or 




by Jenny Douglas 

When I signed myself up to tuU)r in a 
lower-lever, special education class at 
Martha Dendy Middle Sch{X)l, 1 was not 
exactly thrilled with the idea. Some people 
are gifted enough to work in a special 
education department; however, I did not 
Ihmk that 1 was one of those people. Yet, 
even from my first day in class, 1 knew that 
I was in the right place. 

Timmy, Roger, Raichell, Kim, and 
Scott - they have really touched my life. 
Working with them, 1 know that I'm 
making a difference. Whether I am calling 
out spelling words or explaining a math 
problem, they appreciate my taking the 
lime to come from PC to help them. Too 
many people forgetaboulmiddle .schoolers 
because they are no longer cute and little. 
But they, too, need and want your help. 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

MANAGING EDITOR 

For the past 47 years, PC Athletic 
Director Cally Gaull has scheduled his 
Thanksgiving Day festivities around a 
different kind of u-adition. And although it is 
often painful to watch a u-adition drift into 
the recesses of memory, he'll have to do so 
this Thanksgiving Day, as PC faces 
Newberry in the final Thanksgiving Turkey 
Day Bronze Derby Classic. 

The Thanksgiving Day rivalry began m 
1943, and since that lime three generations 
of upstate SC football fans have placed 
football at the top of their holiday agendas. 
Last year, the PC-Newberry match-up was 
one of only four games to be played in the 
entire nation on Thanksgiving Day. 

The end of the tradiuon comes in the 
wake of PC's transition from NAl A athletic 
.standing to NCAA Division II status. ITie 
NCAA regular season ends the second week 
in November. A Thank.sgiving Day game 
could, therefore, interfere with NCAA 
playoff games and would, in any case, make 
the sea.son kx) long. 

"Most of us don't want to move the 
game," explained Gault, "but we reali/e the 
necessity. You just don't limit any team's 
playoff chances." 

The PC-Newbcrry rivalry will always 
be unique, however. Erase "Thanksgiving 
Turkey Day" from the title, and you are still 
left with "Bron/e Derby Classic." What, 
after all, is a bron/c derby, and why do we 
name a football game after it? 

The term onginated as a result of an 
incident dunng a PC-Newberry basketball 
game in January of the 1946-47 season. A 
numberof PC .students travelled to Newberry 
for the game, carrying with them a banner 
bearing the message, "Beat the Hell Out of 
Newberry." 

"They put the banner across the back of 
the gym over the student cheering secuon," 
explained Gault, who was a student at K' at 
the lime. During the game, however, a 
group of Newberry students obtained a 
ladder, climbed up the outside wall o\ the 
gym, rci^hed lhn)ugh the window, and pulled 
the banner out. Once the game ended and 
the K' students reali/ed whai had happened. 



they were determined not to return to Clinton 
without their stolen banner. 

Scuffles and earnest searching ensued. 
In the midst ofthechaos, a Newberry student 
reached through a car window and snatched 
a derby - a type of hat- from the head of a PC 
student. Everyone then forgot about the 
banner and concenyated all efforts on 
ralaiming the beloved derby. 

"The derby had been worn at .some time 
or another by every resident of Sm y th Dorm. 
We took turns wearing it to class," explained 
Gaull, who was sitting in the car from which 
the derby was stolen. 

All searches proved futile, and the Blue 
Hose fans returned to Clinton without their 
banner or iheir derby. Incidentally, Ihey did 
rcium with a 51-47 victory in the game, if 
thai was any consolation. 

Although some of the names and events 
of the ensuing two weeks remain 
undisclosed, we do know that PC's athletic 
publicity director and assistant profcssw of 
English, Charles MacIX)nald, scnialctterto 
Frank Kinard, the editor of the Newberry 
(\)llcge newspaper. Mac Donald pr(^)sed 
thai ihc derby be instituted as a symbt)l of the 
athletic rivalry between the two schools. 
Kinard presented the idea to the Newberry 
student b(xly, who enthusiastically lent their 
suppon of ihe idea. 

" I"he derby was relumed and bron/ed," 
added Gault, "and has since served as a 
symbol ot spons supremacy." 

For several years, the trophy was up for 
grabsatevory athletic conlrontalion between 
the sch(K)ls. Then it was decided U) award it 
only once each year to the winner of the 
annual Ilianksgiving Day contest. 

So w hile the Thanksgiving Turkey Day 
Bron/e iX-rby Classic will bid farewell next 
week, the Bron/e Derby Classic will live on. 
In the future, the game will likely be played 
neiu^lhebeginningof the season. Thesch(x>ls 
will coniinuc to bailie lor possession of the 
irophy 

This year's game will begin at 2;(X) pm 
on Thanksgiving Day here at Bailey Stadium, 
nie coveted Bron/e iX-rby will be delivered 
U) die licld by the (iolden Knighis. a US 
Army Parachute Team. 



The Episcopal Church Especially Welcomes Students 

+ ALL SAINTS' EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

One lilock North of Greenville thnuyg Unll 
Sunday S Lh(p^i^|^ 



8.30 am 

9 45 UT) 
10 30 vn 

11.00 am 
6.00 pm 



Holy Eucharist 
Oviuian l',(iycaiion 
Coffee (mP«fiih Hill) 

Holy Eucharist 

♦ CANTERBURY - lor Coiisga Students 



• Ne9d $omaon0 to ttik 10? 

lite Rev NaiuyJ Alliion, /frcior (U3J 1388) 

The Rev \ m\u\?t»i%on, Prttsi on-Campui (833 S295) 



PC accepts challenge to help world hunger 



by Cynthia Seeliger 

Guest Wntcr 

Lately, the PC community has been 
nouceably concerned about world hunger. 
During the month of Novermber, the Crop 
Walk/JRun for Hunger, the Oxfam Fast, the 
wDrld hunger poetry contest, and Church 
World Service representative Francis 
Daniel's sermon at chapel have all been 
aiiompts to raise campus awareness about 
world hunger. 

On November 6, PC students, faculty. 



and staff gathered to walk around the intra- 
mural complex track, raising money for 
Church World Service'seffoas against world 
hunger. SUB's Reggae Fest band enter- 
tained the walkers and runners. Crop Walk 
organizers rated the walk as a success, with 
38 walkers and over $600 raised. The Crop 
Walk committee consisted of coordinator 
Cynthia Seeliger, Kelley Murphy, Jason 
Greer, Liz Foster, Chns Wmgard, and Tonya 
Snead, who raised $250 in pledges. 

The topic of world hunger came to light 
at PC again when PC's Oxfam Fast kept 
nearly 400 students from their GDH suppers 




PC students walk in the 1992 Crop Walk for hunger a^ the PC Intramural fields. 

pholo by Lauren Owens 

PC students speak Bluehosian 



by Dannie Lynn Hill 

Stall ColumnLst 

I was recently talking with my brother 
about what was going on at schtwl, when 1 
rc»iii/ed thai 1 s|X)ke a foreign language. No. 
I didn'i sudik-nly start speaking in tongues 
and anyone in my Spanish class could tell 
you It definitely wasn't Spanish, or the en 
lire conversation would have been, "hola, 

adios hola.adios " You get the uica The 

liuiguage which 1 speak is what 1 have fondly 
named Bluehosian But, don't think U) your- 
self , this girl has lost it, because most of you 
speiik It ux). If ytxj don't believe me, let me 
give you a sample of a PC convcrsauon. 

"Hey man, wassup'.' " 

" nuttin'" * 

"jeic?" 

"yeah. GDH, pu.'" 

"No. man. Think we'll hit WaHo lo 
night," 

"Cettin U)st in the Suptrmarkei at the 
house lontiiht " 

"Oh, awesome I'll run to Earl's and 
pick up stimc beast." 
Next morning 

"/ swear I am never f(inn^ to ffet tkii 
uhnoki-rtui and do the Pondo-Shuffle 
again 

" Did you shack?" 

" No,)u.st a hook" 
For the few of you that did not understand 
this convcrsauon, let me interpret it for you. 



on NovemberlS. Dining Hall Director 
Vemon Powell agreed to give half of the 
cost of each faster' s would-be supper, which 
amounts to $2.25 per person, to Oxfam. 
Kim Gibson, coordinator of the fast, was 
pleased with the number of participants who 
refrained from eating for the sake of the 
starving. 

Both Oxfam and Church World Service 
are organizations which seek not only to 
feed the hungry but also to prevent the 
causes of world hunger. They work in 
counuies around the world to build eco- 
nomic self-rehance, to meet human needs 
through pr(^rams of social arxl economic 
development, and to help people organize 
and change the condiions that keep people 
poor. 

A poetry contest at PC also raised aware- 
ness of the world's impoverished situation. 
Two faculty members and two students 
judged Richard Harris' "Pigecxi Claws" as 
the best submission. Harris read his poem 
aloud from the bandstand during the reggae 
concert. Several students remarked that the 
reading challenged them and alfected them 
profoundly. 

The last event in PC's hunger aware- 
nesseffort will be the visitof Francis Daniels, 
Church World Service's regional du^ector. 
He will deliver the sermon at PC's chapel 
service at 1 1 :00 am on Tuesday. November 
24. Dunng the service, the money raised 
during Crop Walk will be dedicated to 
Church World Service. All Crop Walk 
participants are heartily invited to come. 



"hello, my fnend, what all is happemng in 

yoiu" life?" 

"Nothing to ^neakof" 

"Did you eat*^" 

"yes. I dined at the Greenville Dining Halt. 

and you?" 

"No. fnend. We will be eating at the kxal 

Waffle House later this evening." 

"The fraternity house will feature the band 

that originated at Washington and Lee, lx>st 

in the Supermarket, tonight around 9:00" 

"Golly, that sounds super. 1 think that I will 

go to the small market by the railmad u-acks, 

Farl'sE-Z Man, and buy some Milwaukee's 

Best beer." 
Next Morning 

" / declare that I will never consume as 
many alcoholic beverages as I did last night 
andwalk througha dew Slung soccer fieldin 
the dead of night, stumble over dirt mounds, 
and run into stone cold bleachers ever 

again" 

"By the way, my young collegiate fnend. 
did you coherce any of your fellow class- 
mates of the opp*)site sex to spend the night 
in your donn rix)m against the college's 
cixle of conduct that is clearly stated in your 
knapsiK;k.'" 

" No. I decided to adhere to all college rules 
and just kiss the co-ed at the fraternity 
houses where all could see (i.e. sihe said 
no.) 

So. do you speak Bluchmian? 




HARVEST 



Working 

tojigk hunger 

in partnership 

mth poiw people 

arowid the world. 



.OxfamI 
Amencai 



Litt[e 9Qiozim J acts... 



The Blue Hose were originally named the Blue 
Stockings. Coach Walter Johnson compared the 
nickname with the Chicago White Sox or Boston 
Red Sox, But others say the name comes from the 
term a "blue-Stocking Presbyterian" or "blue- 
Stocking Parhameni ' to mean someone with 
Strong puritan learnings. 



Source - The Spirit of PC 
Hammeu, 1982 




SPORTS 



8 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 




The PC defense surrounds a Gardner-Webb ball carrier 



photo by Kim Gibson 



Hose football taken down by Gardner- Webb, Carson-Newman 



by Everett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

On a warm Halloween day, in front of 
3500 students, parents, and friends of PC, 
the Blue Hose football team crushed 
Wingate, 34- 1 3. The PC offense, which has 
been inconsistent at times, exploded for 5 14 
total yards, with 354 of them in rushing 
yards. Mason Gordon's six-yard run with 
6:07 remaining in the first quarter made the 
score 6-0. Alex Horion's extra point made 
it 7-0. 

In the second quarter, the scoring 
continued. Withl0:591eftinthehalf.Chris 
Yonce ran the ball 1 1 yards for a touchdown. 
Horton's PAT made the score 14-0. With 
only 2:28 remaining in the half, Horton 
kicked a 40-yard field goal to give the Blue 
Hose a 17-0 lead. Wingate sewed with 46 
seconds to make the score 17-6. PC came 
back before halftime, with Horton's second 
field goal of the game— a 25-yard kick with 
one second remaining before halftime. The 
halftime score was 20-6. 

After a scoreless third quarter by both 
teams, PC's Steve Gome scored on a three 
yard run with 1 3:50 remaining in the game. 
Horton's extra point made the score 26-6. 
Wingate scored with 10:58 left in the game, 
narrowing the Blue Hose lead to 26- 13, but 
Wingate would be shut down for the rest of 
the game. PC increascdiLs lead when Chris 



Yonce ran for 57 yards to score with 6:38 
remaining. Instead of kicking an extra 
point, the Blue Hose squad allempted a two- 
point conversion. Tun Davis' pass to Steve 
Gorrie made the score 34- 1 3, which was the 
final. 

Leading the way for PC was Mason 
Gordon, who had 19 carries for 151 yards 
rushing. Another tnple-digit ru.sher was 
Chris Yonce, who had 1 1 yards on only 1 2 
carries. Eric Byrd ran the ball 1 3 times for 
69 yards. Brad Jones turned in a fine effon 
with four catches for 76 yards receiving. 

The PC defense, which held Wmgate to 
two touchdowns, was not overlooked in the 
game. Linebacker Tony Robertson, who 
had seven tackles, an interception, and a 
quarterback sack, was named both PC and 
State Defensive Player of the Week. 

Two other awards were announced for 
the Wingate game. For his blocking, which 
opened holes for the Blue Hose mshing 
attack, center Tim Williams was named 
Offensive PlayerOf the Week, Kicker Alex 
Horton, who had two field goals and extra 
points, was named Special Teams Player of 
the Week. 

On November 7 PC lost to SAC nval 
Gardner- Webb, 46-13. Gardner- Webb, 
ranked third in the nation. t(X)k advantage ol 
six Blue Hose turnovers. Tyrone Phillips. 



who returned an interception for a 
touchdown, and Todd Shearer, who also 
intercepted a pass, were the Defensive 
POWs. Steve Gonie was Offensive POW. 

Last weekend the Blue Hose travelled 
toCarson-Newman. another conference foe. 
but lost .34-17. Carson-Newman, ranked 
fifth in the nation, kept PC in p(X)r field 
position throughout most of the game. The 
Blue Hosedidhavea 10-0 lead butcouldnot 
hold off the Eagles. Jon Dow and Trent 
Smilh were Defensive POWs, while the 
Offensive K)W was John Edwards. Quincy 
Eigner, who bUxkcd a punt for a touchdown, 
was announced Special Teams POW. 

Head Coach John Perry commented on 
the team's level of play, saying. "We've 
made progress in a lot of areas. Our defense 
is much better, and our offense, even though 
sporadic, has improved. Wc'vcgottcnbetier 
with every game." 

When asked about the im|x)riancc of 
winning the final game of the season, which 
is the final Thank.sgiv ing Turkey I>dy BrtMi/c 
Derby Classic. Perry said, "Always winning 
the last giune is important to the olf-sea.st)n 
and rcc ruiling. The uadilion is a big nvalry 
and a big game for our team and has usually 
the biggest crowd of the year." 



Basketball team 
prepares for 
'92-'93 season 



by Everett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

The PC men's and women's 1992-93 
basketball scasonsarc just around ihecomcr, 
and both programs are excited. The men's 
team, last year's SAC tournament runner-up 
and ranked first in the preseason conference 
poll, hosted the Kentucky Sports Crusaders 
in an exhibition game last night. Their first 
regular season home game is at 7:30 on 
Tuesday . November 24 against Lees- McRae. 
The Blue Hose men's team, which had a 
record of 18-13 last year, have all five of 
their starters bjKk from last year. Junior 
cenierJohn Lloyd, senior forward Bret Jones, 
junior forward Derrick Lovelace, junior 
guard Andrew Wcllman, and sophomore 
guard Mike Camacho will be starling lor the 
Blue Hose. 

When asked about the kinds of goals 
the team has set for the season, Head Coach 
Gregg Nibcrt said. 'The only goals we've 
set are U) go out there and play the absolute 
best we can. We did finish second last year 
and are not satisfied with being second." 

After being asked how far the team can 
go, Nibert replied, "I think the key to this 
basketball team is how hungry, inu'nse, and 
focused they are. It doesn't come down to 
the team that has the most talent but to the 
team that wants it the most and plays hardest. 
If they play well, they can conuol their 
desuny." 

Finally, Nibert commented on the 
student support, saying, 'The fans are the 
most im|X)rtani grcxip of pe4>ple. They are 
our sixth man on the team. I want the 
students to have a gcKxl lime and enjoy the 
game. The more we have, the better" 

Thewomen'ssquad.witha 16-11 record 
in the 1991-92 season, is ranked fourth in the 
pre -season conference poll, llic Lady Blue 
Hose play at Converse on November 24 and 
host the Little Four Tournamenl on 
[:)ecember 2-3. On IX-cember 2 Newben^ 
plays Wolford at 6:()() and K^ will play 
Erskine at K:(X). TTie winners of the 6:(K)and 
8:(X) games will play each other in the 
championship game on ihi' following day. 

After losing four seniors, the women's 
team has three reiurning starters: junior 
center Shannon Trammel, sophomore 
forward Mclanie Johnson, and junior guard 
Jennifer Hilliard. 



Miller remembered as one who never ceased to 'flash that smile' 



by (ireg Desto 

GUEST WRITER 

When Marcus Miller passed away on 
October 20, the Presbyterian College 
community and the world lost more than a 
great athlete and more than a well -liked 
student U)st was a quality person who was 
true to him.self and U) everyone who knew 
him, and lost was a rare human being who 
was never too busy to smile. 



Though a .3(X) hitter and the steadiest 
fielder in the Blue Hose inlicld. Mi^cus's 
value went well beyond the physical. Marcus 
was a likely captain for the upcoming season, 
the player U) whom others turned when a big 
hit or a big defensive play was needed, and 
a person who was l(X)ked to for instrucuon 
and advice. 

His baseball ability, a.s well as his 
straightforward ap|)roach U) the game, earned 
him the confidence and respect of every 



single one of his teammates. And he smiled 
all the while. 

Off the field as well as on, Marcus was 
very much a "stand up guy." Iliat is. he ux)k 
responsibilities upon his own shoulders and 
never had an excuse for anything He never 
needed one. He was a person whodid things 
his own way. never seeking the approval of 
anyone and never ce*ising U) Hash that smile. 

Man us was one of the lew people that 
I have ever met whose ix>sitive attributes I 



wish I could k'ller imitate and whose loss I 
could grieve as the loss ol one of the best and 
tniesi friends that I have ever had. But since 
the (xlds were not in my favor that my life 
would bring me one thousand miles from 
my hiMiie in Mass^ichuseitsioClinton, where 
I would meet a Black [XTson Irom lH)iuilds, 
South Carolina, who would become the iMily 
person within my age gniup thai I have ever 
kx)ked up to, 1 have reason to do as Marcus 
would (k), ami smile. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



SPORTS 



Men's soccer falls short in SAC-8 finals 



bv Brian Sacco 

STAFT WRITER 

After captunng the regular season SAC 
title, the Blue Hose soccer team rolled into 
the tournament with another title in mind. 
K' defeated Wingate in the first round and 
Elon in the semi-finals but was defeated for 
the Ulle in a double overtime game against 
Lcnior-Rhyne. 

Coach Ralph Poison stated, "We 
accomplished more ih is season than anyone 
could have expected." 

In the opening round of the SAC 
tournamenl. the Blue Hose defeated 
Wmgate 4-0. Shannon Brown, Todd 
Chandler, Dan Walbolt, and John Mairs 
scored for PC. while Chri.st Napior, Will 
l.indsu-om, Richard Wright, and Chns 
Bruno added assists. The Blue Hose 
controlled the game with 38 shots, allowing 
the regular starters to sit out the second half. 
With the vicU)ry. PC set a new school 
record with nine shutouts. 

The Blue Hose tackled Elon College in 
the semi-finals and came out victorious 4- 
^ in double overume. Mark Albertus saved 
one PK tor the Blue Hose m a thnlling 
game. In the finals, PC Kxik on Ixnior- 
khyne. who shut down the Blue Hose and 
scored with six minuU-s left in the second 
1 overtime to defeat PC 



Women's soccer completes season 



By virtue of their SAC regular season 
title. PC advanced to the Disuict 26 semi- 
finals and confronted Belmont Abbey 
College. PC fell to Belmont Abbey 3-0, 
finishing the season with a 15-4-3 record. 

"Belmont Abbey was possibly the best 
team we have played all season," 
commented Poison. 

The Blue Hose have accomplished 
many noteworthy achievements this season. 
Akxig with being named first team All- 
SAC and All Tournament team members. 
Lindsuom and Napior were also named to 
the first team All- Disuict. Lindsu-om was 
named SAC Player of the Year and 
Tournament MVP. 

Jason Woodall. Michael Martin. 
Norman de Waart, and Albertus were named 
to the Second Team All-SAC. and Brown 
and Jason Beuchlcr were named to the AU- 
Toumameni Team. 

Poison was plea.sed with the 
outstanding play of the seniors and their 
comnnuncni to the success of the program. 
He cited that the seniors were responsible 
tor fifiy-four of his victories at PC. The 
Blue Hose finished theseason ranked 21 m 
the nauon and3 in Area 8. 



by Amanda Bowers 

STAFF WRITER 

The Presbyterian women ' s soccer team 
ended its 1992 season with a winning record 
of 14-7. After winning their last regular 
season game against Queens College, they 
went on to play four post-season games. 
Winning the first round of the conference 
playoffs against Wmgate by a score of 6-0, 
the Lady Blue Hose defeated Catawba in the 
conference semi-finals, 5-1. 

The team then suffered a 3-0 loss to 
Elon College in the conference tournament 
finals. Advancing to the Districts because 
they were conference co-champions, the 
squad played its last game of post-season on 
November 3 at Coker College. The Blue 
Hose were defeated, 1-0. 

Nevertheless, Head Coach Brian Purcell 
was pleased with his team's perfomiance. 
He commented, "We outplayed Coker 
throuhgout the game, but we had a difficult 
time sconng. ' 

Several players received awards this 
season . and Coach Purcell was named both 
Conference and District Coach of the Year. 
Chnsti Flack. Charity Brazeal, and Missy 
BuUcr were named to the first-team All- 
Conference, and Nicole Dnisc and Kathleen 



Dowd were second team All-Conference 
selections. The SAC Freshman of the Year 
award went to Charity Brazeal, while the 
Conference Player of the Year award went 
to Missy Butler. PC players that were named 
to the All-District Team include Flack, 
Brazeal, Butler, and Dowd. Butler was also 
named District Player of the Year. 

Refiec ting on the season.Coach Purcell 
said, "1 am a liule disappointed about the 
way it ended, but I'm excited about the 
program." He went on to say that all twenty 
players will be returning next sea.son and the 
team shoud be equally as good as it was this 
year, if not better. 

Purcell also commented on the final 
record of 14-7 by saying, "Of the seven 
games we lost, only two of the teams we 
played were significantly better than us: 
Mercer and Lynn University, the number 
one team in the counu^." 

Co-captain Nicki Soderberg also 
commented on the season by saying, "Even 
though the season ended sooner than 
expected, overall it was a ptKitive season 
baause of how far we came." 



Intramural Lady Blue Hose spike opponents for SAC-8 title 



News 



The Intramural Department would like 
tocongratulaie this year's inuamural soccer 
champions: Men's A-League - KA; Men's 
B U-ague ITieta Chi 1; Men's C-League - 
Chicos Malos; Women's League - Beaty 

House. 

The Sport-s Trophy standings are as 

follows: I 

Men's A-Uague - Pi Kappa Phi (180) | 

TheiaChi(l4()) I 

Men'sBLeague-TheiaChi(l2()) Org. j 

Jack (80) ! 

Women's league Theta Chi Rush ' 
Girls (140) ADh(l(K)) ZTA 
(UX)) Beaty Hou.se (UX)) 

The First Annual Intramural Sports 
In via 1 ouniamentiix)k place Monday night 
m Sjvings Campus Cenu.-r. Over seventy 
participants took part m the contest that 
consisted of one hundred ijuesuons from all 
f;K.eis of the s|x>rts world 

Ilie champions were the "7th Inning 
Stretch Marks:'a U'am which consisted of 
Grant Vosburgh, Jim Morton, and Steve 
Owens. Some disgmntlcd students voiced 
the opinion that the "older" champions 
should he ineligible because they were alive 
when the in via tcx)k place 

In any case, the conU'si «,i> .i miwCss 
and the Intramural IX-piirtmeni thanks all 
who participylcd. 



bv Brian Sacco 

STAFF WRITER 

Playing on their home court, the Lady 
Blue Hose volleyball team captured iheSAC 

tournament title alter finishing second, with 
a 6-1 record, in the regular seascxi SAC 
rankings. 

Led by tournamenl MVP Dionne 
Williams and All Tournament teammate 
Lisa Kimbrell, the team moved thmugh the 
tournament unscathed and finished with a 
32-6 post- tournament rcxixd. 

Head Coach Beth Couture staled, "Key 
defensive plays cartied us through the 
tournament, mainly by Senior Chnsti Wynn 
and Freshman Kristy Tarallo" 

The following weekend, the Udy Blue 
Hose travclledU)the District 26 Tournament 
The Lady Hose defeated St. AndrewsCollege 
(15-7, 15-7, 15 9) but fell short against Elon 
College m the finals (5-15, 9-15, 1517). 
The loss ended the Blue Hose season, but 
Kimbrell and Williams were named to the 
All- Distnci team. 

The tcaiTi ended the season with a 33-7 
record, and Couture was extfemely pleased 
with the players' efforts "We weren't really 
sure about how successful we would be this 
season, but as our confidence grew we 
achieved our usual level of success." 

Couture cited the great leadership and 
tradition that was displayed ihrouglxHil the 
seascMi She also indicated that the consistent 
play ol Jennifer Smith on setups and Kelly 
Brown and Lon Suit in the back was a 
strength. 

Kimbrell and Williams were named to 
the first team All-SAC. while Ashley Jenkins [ 
was scleclcd to the second team All-SAC 




K' Senior Chrisli Wynn prepares for in opponenfs serve. photo by Km Gibson 



ENVIRONMENT 



10 



FRIDAY, NOYHMBFiR 20, 1992 



Vegetarianism expresses care for the environment 



by Heather Moncrief 

ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 

Evidence of humans eating other 
animals can be found for all periods of 
humankind. While a majority of Americans 
are raised believing that healthy eating is 
attained only by including animal product<« 
in the diet, such misconceptions have been 
frequently disproved. Millions of human 
beings lead long, healthy, and productive 
lives without eating animal flesh. 

Not only is such a vegetarian diet 
healthy for an individual, it is also healthy 
for the Earth. Meat causes our entire envi- 
ronment to suffer; it suffers from such 
things as overgrazing, water pollution and 
waste, topsoil erosion, and rainforest defor- 
estation. The production of animals for 
human consumption wastes energy as well 
as plant food resources. 

The leading cause of water pollu- 
tion in the U.S. is agriculture. A majority of 
these impuribes are from hvestock manure. 
The extensive system of feedloLs in the 
United States is the main cause of this prob- 
lem. A feedlot is a small space contammg 
hundreds to thousands of domesticated live- 
stock. While large amounts of energy arc 
put into these feedlots, great quantities of 
animal wastes come out. Portions of these 
wastes are washed into surface water, con- 
taminating it with excess niu-ates and other 
plant nutrients as well as with disease -caus- 
ing bacteria 

Water is also wasted in the produc- 



tion process. More than half of all water 
used in our country is used in livestock 
production. Two thousand five hundred 
gallons of water are required in the produc- 
tion of one pourjd of beef, and the amount of 
water needed to feed 
an animal -eater for 
one month could feed 
a total vegetarian for 
over a year. It should 
alsobenoted that fifty 
times more fossil fu- 
els are required to 
produce an animal- 
centered diet than a 
vegetarian diet. 

As Ameri- 
can -based compan ics 
and companies from 
other developed 
countries seek cheap 
beef, forests around 
the globe are de- 
stroyed. Forty per- 
cent of all Central 
American rainforcsis 
were converted into pasture land for beef 
catUe between 196() and 1985. The beef 
from these once-fertile rainforesLs is .sold to 
our counU7 lor use in such items as ham- 
burgers, pel f(xxl, baby foods, frozen din- 
ners, and luncheon meals. Five cents whole - 
.sale on a hamburger is saved by fa.st-food 
chains using imported beef rather than do- 
mestic beef, and fifty-five square feel of 
rainforest are desuoyed for each of these 



burgers made from Central American cattle. 
While companies claim not to purchase this 
imported beef, it is impossible to track ihe 
imported beef's course once it enters the 
domestic market. Claims can be neither 

proven nor 

disproven. 

Many conserva- 
tionists believe 
that a labeling sys- 
A lem for the im- 
ported beef needs 
to be mandated. 
Five cents' sav- 
ings and the loss 
of fifty-five 
.square feet for a 
single burger 
seem monstrous 
when compared lo 
a sparing of an 
acre of trees each 
year for each indi- 
vidual who con- 
verts to a bccflcss, 
animal-less dicl. 
While famine exists in lesser de- 
veloped counu^ics, iivesiak in the more 
developed countries are feed very well us- 
ing high percentages of the world's fcxxl 
resources. Approximately half of ihe world's 
yearly production of grain and a third of the 
world's yearly fish catches arC used by the 
more developed countries lo feed livestock . 
The grains and fish which could feed human 
beings arc rerouted to fatten livesKKk. Put 




Vegetarianism: What is it all about? 



by Heather Moncrief 

ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 

Vegetarianism can stem from concern 
for the environment, for animal rights, and 
for one's health as well as from religious 
beliefs. As a fourth-year vegetarian, my 
reasons are both environmentally based and 
animal-rights centered. After reading many 
bodes, articles, and magazines which f(x:u.sed 
on the waste of energy and the dcsuuction of 
the environment caused by livestock pro- 
duction as well as on the cruel u^catmeni of 
animals and the intnxluction of foreign hor- 
mones into their systems, I was able to easily 
alter my diet to exclude animal prcxlucts. I 
now exclude such items as meat, eggs, and 
gelatin, which is derived from horse hooves. 

I havedonc much resc^ia h tocnsure my 
own g(Kxl health. Professional studies have 
revealed that healthier, longer lives are at- 
tained by a varied diet, adequate but not in 
excess of calories, high in complex carbo- 
hydrates and vegetables, iind low in fat (es- 
pecially animal fat) and salt. The traditional 
four f(X)d groups are being replaced by re- 
searchers with new nutritional guidelines 
that arc understandable and easy to fiillow 
and which exclude cinimal [M'(xlucts. 

The guidelines which I tend to follow 
are from Laurel's Kitchen, a vegetarian 
c<x)kb<x)k and guidebook. The fcxxl fami- 
lies defined in this txxik arc .i fiillows: 



whole grains, super-vegetables, high-car- 
bohydrate vegetables, low-caloric veg- 
etables, legumes, dairy foods (optional), nuts 
and seeds, fruit, and eggs (optional). To 
obtain adequate protein and other nutrients, 
a vegetarian's daily consumption .should 
KKludc four servings of whole-grain fixxLs 
and three servings of vegetables, including 
one of the super- vegetables such as dark 
leafy greens, pea pods, brussels sprouts, 
briKcoli, or okra. A serving of a super- 
vegetable, legumes (cooked dry beans, len- 
fils, or split peas), or dairy foods .should also 
be consumed daily. 

Many do not realize that there are dif- 
ferent degrees of vegetarianism. The.sc are 
as follows: 

♦Semi-vegclarian- Diet consists of fruits, 
grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, vcgciablcs, 
dairy pr(Klucts,eggs, chicken, and fish. 

•Pcsco-vcgclarian- Diet consists of fruits, 
grams, legumes, nuts, seed, vegetables, dairy 
prcxlucts, eggs, and fish. 

* I .aclo-ovo- vegetarian Diet consists of 
Iruits, grams, legumes, nuts, seeds, veg- 
etables, dairy prtxlucts, and eggs. 

•Lacto- vegetarian- Diet consists of fruits, 
grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, vegetables, and 
dairy prcxlucts. 

♦Ovo-vegelarian- Dicl includes fruits, 
grains, legumes, nuts,. seeds, vegetables, and 
eggs. 

•Vegan- Dicl includes fruib, giains, lo 



gumcs, nuts, seeds, and vegetables. 

A vegetarian dicl allows me to express 
my environmental convictions and my com- 
passion for our neighboring inhabitants. I 
donoicxpectall oi'ihc Blue Stocking readers 
to throw down ihcir papers and baome die- 
hard vcgcuinans on the spot, but 1 do hope 
thai more thought will go inU)an individual's 
eating habits. 

The lollowing list of restaurants in the 
Greenville area which offer vcgeiarian meals 
was received from ihc Grcenvilk Vcgeiar- 
ian Society. 

Annie's Natural Cafe downtown 

Cirwnvillc 

Pita House Pleasaniburg Drive, rcsiau- 

rani and market 

Sophisticated Palate duwniown 

Spaght'lli Warehouse hasl Broad .St. 

Taho South downtown Greenville 

Continental Cafe 

HI<H'k ll(>u*te 

Cafe St. John 

Mc(;uffey's 

Olive (iarden 

Boston Vii/M 

Pla/a Diner 

Ruby luesdays 

Applebees 

()'(hariie«i 

Subway 



into simpler temis, if Americans were to 
lower their consumption of meat by ju.si ten 
percent, twelve million more tons of grain 
would be available to feed each of the sixty 
million humans who starve to death e«;h 
year. 

Large amounts of energy are used 
in the production of food. Seventeen per- 
cent of the annual commercial energy in the 
United States is expended on the counuy's 
vast agriculture system. A majority of the 
plant crops yield a greater amount of fixxl 
energy than the amount of energy (mainly 
from fossil fuels) used to grow them. How- 
ever, the process of raising animals for fcxxl 
requires much grcau-ramounis of fossil fuel 
energy than is supplied by the animals as 
fcKxl energy. Despite this waste of energy, 
liveslcxk graze on a third of the land in this 
counuy and more than half of the ct)unU'y's 
croplands are planted with feed lor this 
livcsUKk. Rather than fcxusmg on less 
wasteful, high yield fixxl sources such as 
vegetables, the country fix uses on wasteful, 
low-yield, and expensive animal st)uaes 
such as cattle. 

While land is disrupted, animals 
arc domesticated and slaughtered for human 
consumption. The environmental care is 
there, but for most people the conviction is 
not. Until individuals learn to make sacri- 
fices for the preservation of the environment 
and to l(X)k beyond national borders, the 
condiuons around the globe will continue to 
worsen. 



Vegetarian Potluck 

The Greenville Vegetarian 
Society's next meeting is 
Tuesday, December 1 . Tliis 
meeting will be a potluck 
dinner. FC students, fac- 
ulty, and staff members 
who are vegetarians or are 
interested in travelling to 
this meeting should contact 
Heather Moncrief at 833- 
9515 or Lauren Owings at 

ext. X914. 
Depending on the number 

of people interested, a 

carpool may be organized. 

it shoulti be a fun evening 

and a good meal, too! 



i 



I RIDAY. NOVEMBER 20. 1992 



11 



ENTERTAINMENT 



SUB's Reggae Fest stirs up interest among PC students 



by Camishii Clarke 

ENTLRTAINMENT EDITOR 



A week of haunting rain preceding an 
u[\;oming ould(x)r event would 
make any organi/auon cringe, 
including the Student Union 
Hoard (SUB). On Friday, 
November 6th, SUB sponsored 
iLs 3rd annual Fall Fling with an 
added twist to attract even the 
least active members of the 
^Ilu^cnt body: a reggae band. 

'I"he days passed slowly as 
members of SUB began to 
wonder alx)ui the outcome and 
ihanges brought about from a 
damp Friday. Tuesday and 
Wednesday were not 
encouraging, considering the 
ujnsiant showers and chilling 
lenijK'raturcs. Thurstlay was the 
last hope! Unfortunately. 
ITiursday, too, was filled with 
disup|H)inting rain and muddy 

shlK'S. 

With the welcomed sunshine 
on Friilay morning came dry land 
and the rebirth of hope. Fall 
I ling: Reggae Fesi ia)k place as 
scheduled on the Intramural 
Complex later that afternoon. 

J. Warren Sloanc, co-chair 
of the SUB Dance and Big 



"One Drop Plus," the popular reggae 
band out of AUanta, Georgia, gave an 
outstanding performance. Freshman Heidi 
Gram ling spoke highly of the performance. 



even belter. 

Inaddilion to using the traditional media 
for advertising, SUB took a few extra steps 
towards a successful event. Since the 



A group of PC students groove to Ihe beat of One 

"1 thought the band did a really gcxxl 



Weekends Committee, which 

lunded and organized the event, 

expressed his enthusiasm for 

using a reggae band. Sloane believes that 

reggae music "revived Fall Fling because job." said Gramlmg. "One Drop Plus" 

It's boon a failure for the past two years." pertormcd stime popular songs such as hits 

Atuacting approximately 2{X)U) 250 people by the great Bob Marley and the Melody 

on the inuainural complex, this event could Makers and Ziggy Marley. Many song 

easily be cal led a success. requests were made, which made the concert 



Campus Center office. Freshman Meg 
Whiten said, "The t-shirts were terrific. I 
think the bright colors caught everyone's 
attention and brought interest to them." 
There was also a good response 
financially lo the selling of 
Dominos Pizza and novelty 
items at Reggae Fest. 
Also, spoons advertising 
Reggae Fesi and the ever- 
popular Bob Marley song 
"Stir It Up" were placed in 
mailboxes. Sophomore 
Rebecca Babcock thought 
that the spoons were an 
effective and memorable 
means of advertisement. 
"It was an onginal idea that 
really got people's attention. 
It made people remember the 
purpose of the message better, 
instead of a flier which people 
throw away without even 
reading," says Babcock. 
In the future, Sloane feels 
that "lots of advertisement 
[and] a positive attitude" will 
improve the students' 
responses to future SUB 
events, which will likely 
consist of a variety of bands 
performing either reggae, 
jazz, dance, blues, or rock 
music. 
Like all SUB events. Reggae 

Drop Plus at the recent Raggae Fest. , ^ f«l"[U)ok]alotof hard work 

^ photo by Lauren O^utgs and plannmg. accordmg to 

Sloane. He is looking forward to Winter 




majoniy of the student body is "poster blind." 
SUB used eye-catching red, green, and gold 
posters which quickly disappeared from 
boards and walls all over campus. The t- 
shirts, which are similar m appearance to the 
posters, are being sold for S8 in the Springs 



Formal, the next event sponsored by the 
Dance and Big Weekends Committee. 
Winter Formal, scheduled for Saturday. 
February 6. 1993. will incluifc; a well-known 
daiKe band and a DJ. 







L 



15% discount on yourncxt 
meal at Terry's. 

Offer not good with other specials or coupons. 

Musi present coupon at the time of purchase 

Expires 12-3- 92 



J 




ENTERTAINMENT 



12 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1992 



Madrigal Dinner-Concert marks 27 years of Christmas tradition 



by Maxwell Vallotton 

STAFF WRITER 

If you are looking for a different way to 
celebrate the holiday season this year, you 
might want to experience the strolling 
minstrels, brass fanfares, jester's pranks, 
Morris dancers, instrumentalists, and the 
magic of the traditional style of "Merrie 
Olde England." 

The 27th annual Madrigal Dinner- 
Concert will be held on Dacmbcr 4 and 5 at 
7:30 pm in Greenville Dining Hall. The 
event will feature PC's Madrigal Singers as 
well as a dinner that will include roasted 
beef, native English cheeses, Yorkshire 
pudding, and plum pudding. 

Tickets are available for both 
performances at a price of $1.5 per person. 
Tickets may be obtained by sending a check 
made payable to Madrigal Singers to 
Madrigal Singers, Presbyterian College, 
Clinton, SC 29325. A self-addressed, 
stamped envelope should be included so 
that tickets may be mailed back. 

Reservations will only be acknowledged 
at the door. All reservations for both 
performances must be made by Friday, 
November 27. Table assignments for groups 
and parties wishing to sii together will be 
arranged provided reservations are made at 
the same time. No refunds after November 
24 and no reservations will be made by 
telephone. 




The Madrigal Dinner-Concert has become an annual Christmas tradition for the PC community. This year' 
are set for December 4 and 5 at 7:30 pm in (ireenville Dining Hall. phoio courtesy 



s performances 
of Public Relations 



Upcoming CEP Events 



Student Directed One- Act Play Series - November 20/21 at 7:30 pm 

Douglas House Theater 

PC Choir Fall Concen - November 22 at 8: 1 5 pm 
Edmunds Hall 

PC Wind Ensemble Fall Concert - November 24 at 8: 1 5 pm 

Belk Auditorium 

Convocation with Dr. James Leavell - December 1 at 1 1 :()0 am 

(Dr. Leavell will speak on Japanese traditional values and their 

contemporary influence.) 

Bclk Auditorium 

Madrigal Dinner-Concert - December 4/5 at 7:30 pm 
Greenville Dining Hall 

Convocation on International Studies - December 8 at 1 1 :00 am 

(Presentation by PC students who have studied abroad.) 

Belk Auditorium 



PC Choir to present fall concert 



by FJi/.abeth Cunard 

STAFF WRITER 

The forty-one voice PresbyiTiun 
College Choir will present a fall concert on 
Sunday, November 22, at 8:15 pm in 
tidmunds Hall. The performance is a CEP 
event. 

The mixed choir will sing a wide vancty 
o( selections from the early Bar(X|ue Penixl 
to the present day. Featured composers will 
be John Amncr, Johann W Frank, Thomas 
Hasungs, Charles Vilhers Sianlord, Pavel 
Tchesnokov, Las/lo Halmos, and Kenneth 
Jennings. Folk arrangements and spirituals 
will round out the mostly sacred program. 

Soloists will include Senior Eli/iibcth 
Bryan, Junior David E. Lt)ng, Sophomore 
Catherine Hcxlges, and Freshman Brad 
Drake. Dr. Karen Eshelman, assistant 
professor of music, will accompany the 
Sunlord "(iloria in Excelsis," and Chrisiv 
Smiihcrman, a senior from Marietta, 

INTERVffiW SUITS 

STARTING AT $200 



Georgia, Will provide Other acu)iiipaiiimcnts. 
Dr. Charles T. Games, Charles A, Dana 
Professor of Mu.sic,isconductor of thechoir. 
(iaines has taught at F^esbytenan College 
since 1%.^. He is also Director of Music at 
First Presbyterian Church in Grcenwcxxl 
and IS the lounckrand director ol the Laurens 
County Chorale. Gaines is a member of the 
American Choral Directors Assoc lalion and 
recently was chair of the third annual South 
Carolina Intercollegiate Choir, (iains is 
also Vice-Presick'nt for Membership of the 
South Can)lina Music Teachers Assck lalion. 
I'he PC Choir is not solely composed of 
music majors but also incorporates students 
from several fields of study. The choir has 
performed in churches throughout the 
Southeast and has pexlormed in Europe on 
several tours 




PUBLIC SQUARE IJ\URENS 



Need Papers Typed? 




$1.50 per page. 
Contact Neely at 8641 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVII Number 5 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. South Carolina 29325 



Friday, December 4. 1992 




PC Registrar resigns to take NC job 

Search begins for Gash's replacement 



bv Jason West 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

As of December 23, 1992, Presbyterian 
College will be without a Registrar and 
Assistant Dean. 

Dr. Bill Gash, who presently holds those 
two titles, has announced his resignation in 
order to take the position of Assistant Vice 
Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs at 
Pembroke State 
University in 

Pembroke, North 
Carolina. 

Gash's 
resignation was 
announced in a 
prepared memo by 
PC's Vice President 
for Academic Affairs 
Dr. Bill Moncnef. 
"Although I am sure 
all of us hate to see 
him (Gash) leave, I 
hope you will join me 
in wishing him well 
in his new position," 



admissions material, and registration. In 
addition, the registrar is responsible for 
certification of transfer and transient work 
and conducts the foreign study program. 
The registar's office is also responsible for 
conducting senior audits. 

"We intend to move as quickly as 
possible in order to find a replacement for 
I>. Gash. However, we 
will move with deliberate 
speed. We want to make 
sure we get the right person 
for the job," added 
Moncnef. 

Until a replacement can be 
found. Assistant Registrar 
Flo Dowdle will take the 
primary responsibility for 
the office. Moncnef states 
the he is ultimately 
responsible for all action 
in the registrar' s office and 
that he and Dowdle might 
have to "double up" with 
the work load. 




Dr. BU G«k 



PC students prepare for the holidays in difTerenl ways, kathrvn Klliot gets into the 
spirit by helping with Westminster Fellowship's ( hrLstmas Kifl-making workshop, 
which was held at First Presbyterian this past Wednesday. phtHo by Km Cnbson 



said Moncnef in the memo. 

According to Moncnef, a (kcision about 
how the search for a new registrar will be 
conducted has not been determined as of 
yet. "When an officer of the college leaves, 
we usually redefine the job description 
M>mcwhat. As PC changes, the positions 
and responsibilities of the college's officers 
change," said Moncnef. 

Presently, the registrar is responsible 
fwkeeping all official recordsof the college, 
including each student's records on courses. 



fdtphoto 
Even 



though PC may have to function 
without a registrar for a while, Moncnef 
does not expect students to be 
inconvenienced. "I don't really see where 
there will be a problem. Regisirauonwillgo 
smoothly, and most students will probi^ly 
not notice, " he said. 

"However, students may have to be 
more understanding and patient since wc 
might be having an extra work load m the 
registrar's office," added Moncnef. 



Arnold Symposium to focus on 'Sports and the Media' 



On The Inside 



Page 3 . . . 

Blue Stocking Features Editor 
Martha Lvnn Smith travels to 
Laurens, South Carolina, to visit 
with the "Doll Lady." 

Page 3 . . . 

PC students share their favorite 
Christmas traditions. 



Press Release 

OFFICH OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

When ancient Greeks gathered every 
lour years lor the Olympic Games, they vied 
for the thnll of compcuiion in sports, music, 
and literature. The winner was awarded a 
crown made of wild olive branches. 

When the world'sbestaihletcscom pete 
in the modem Olympic Games, they arc 
vying for much more than gold, silver, or 
bron/e medals To those vicKks go spoils 
such as lucrauvc endorsements, television 
offers, and fat prolessional contacts. 

Rcnosvncd spt>rts aulhws and media 
commenlaiors like Frank Dclord, John 
Fcinsicm, and Dr Harry Edwards will 
attempt lo Iwidgc the gap between Mount 
Olympusand Atlanta dunng the I 'W3AnH>kl 
Symposium ol the Russell Program on 
"Sports and iho Media," scheduled for 
February \S 17. 1993. at Presbyterian 
College, 



The symposium will open at 7:30 pm 
on Monday, February 15, when a faculty 
panel discusses "The Traditional Role of 
Sports: The Onginal Idea Before It Became 
a Media Obsession," in Edmunds Hall 
Chainng the paiwl will be Assastanl PnrfcssiH 
of Psychology Dr. Diane Finley. a former 
college athlete and ccach who has performed 
rescaah in sports psychology. 

Feinstcin. author of the best-selling 
spt)rts btx)ks A Season on the Bnnk and A 
§ca>on Inside , will ofx*n events on Tuesday, 
FcN"uar> 16, when he addresses "What the 
Meuia Have Done to Sports," at 1 1 :tX)am in 
Bclk Audiionum. Feinstein has appeared 
regularly on ESPN's acclaimed program 
"llic Sports Reptmcrs." 

Topics ranging frwn how television 
coiuraL ts affect professional sports leagues 
to the relationship betwa'n athletes and the 
media will be fair game dunng a roundtable 
discussion fcatunng athletes and nKmbers 



of the media. Serving as moderator will be 
Dcford, former editor of the now defunct 
all-sports newspaper rV A/o/wna/, wntcr fw 
Sports Illustrated, author, and commentator 
on National Public Radio The discussion 
will begin at 2:00 pm in Edmunds Hall. 

Dr. Margaret Duncan will present a 
slide lecture at 4:00 pm in Edmunds Hall on 
"Wwnen, Sports, and the Me<lia." Duncan 
is the author of Sports Images and Sexual 
Differences: Images of Women and Men in 

UK 1984 and 1988 Qlmva Games. wn»en 

about how the media have depicted women 
Olympians 

Beginning at 7 : 30 pen in Edmunds Hall. 
Dr. Edwards will focus ot 'The Media's 
Effect on Racial Issues in Sports." Dr. 
F^wards serves as a consultant for Major 
League Baseball on mimmty issues and is 
the leading authority on minonty related 
issues of pro sports manage meniand college 
ac^Kkmic-aihletK reforms. 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1992 



Spring Break trip offers chance for PC to make a positive difference 

by Lejeanna Maddox exactly whaiagroupofPC students, faculty, purpose. proximately half ol the disianceihat day. 

MANAGING EDITOR arnl staff will be doing this March during "The trin is one special way to exercise the weather c(X)perates, they will spend S 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1992 



FEATURES 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

MANAGING EDITOR 

Last Wednesday marked the official 
end of hurricane season for the Atlantic 
Seaboard and the Gulf Coast But that end 
came only after a number of hurricanes 
wreaked havoc in several areas of the 
United States. Approximately 100,900 
families were displaced from their homes as 
a result of Hurricane Andrew, and many of 
those peqjle will spend the holidays in tent 
villages without the luxuries of indoor 
plumbing or electricity. By some estimates, 
it will take $22 billion and at least ten years 
to rebuild the devastated areas. 

Such natural disasters leave us disillu- 
sioned, craving for some reassurance of a 
prevailing order. Perhaps the best way to 
respond to such a trauma is to attempt to find 
- or to create- some positive aspect That's 



exactly what a group of PC students, faculty, 
and staff will be doing this March during 
Spring Break, as they travel to South Miami 
to participate in clean-up efforts organized 
by the Presbyterian Church. 

Aside from having a number of students 
who were directly affected by the storm, PC 
has another coincidental connection with 
the Dade County area. Rev. Sally Campbell- 
Evans, who is a 1983 graduate of PC, has 
been hired by the Presbytery of Tropical 
Florida as the Project Coordinator for hur- 
ricane relief efforts. 

On a recent visit to the area, PC's Dr. 
Bob Smith met with Campbell -Evans and 
discussed the possibility of PC's sending a 
group to aid in the clean-up efforts. He 
returned to campus and immediately formed 
a committee to organize the effort. Laura 
Smith, a student member of the planning 
committee, sees the U^ip as serving a dual 



purpose. 

"The trip is one special way to exerci.se 
our motto of Dum Vivimus Servimus, espe- 
cially since PC has various interests in the 
area," she said. "It will also be a g(xxi 
opportunity for students, faculty, and staff 
to interact in a different environment than 
their campus roles demand. What an oppor- 
tunity! Where else can you get diriy with 
your fellow students and professors?" 

The U"ip is open to anyone who is in 
terestcd, and people from every aspect of 
campus life arc encouraged to participate. 
The esiimalcd cost is only SKK), as the 
Presbyterian Church USA will provide a 
large percentage of the u-ansponaiion and 
housing needs. Members ol ihe PC group 
will be housed in a Presbyterian church in 
South Miami, 

The group will leave PC on the first 
Friday of Spring Break and will uavcl ap- 



proximately half of the distance that day. If 
the weather c(X)perates, they will spend Sat- 
urday on the beaches near Daytona and will 
make the remainder of the trip to Miami on 
Sunday. They will return lo campus on the 
last Friday of the break. 

One of the greatest advantages of at- 
tending a small, liberal arts college is un- 
doubtedly the opportunity to interact in small 
group siiuauons: lo communicate intcllec- 
iually;lodevek)pasociala)nsciousness;to 
grow through shared, though sometimes 
painful, experiences; ami to learn from oth- 
ers who have diverse talents to offer. Are 
you intea'sted in taking part in this unique 
opportunity lo tap into PC's immense re- 
sources and to crcale something positive 
from apparent disaster? Contact Dr. Bob 
Smith, Ljura Smith, LeJeanna Maddox, or 
Dr. Ron Bumside befi)re you go home for 
Christmas, 



Historic symbols often cause unnecessary racial misunderstandings 



by Neely Loring 

GUEST WRITER 

There has been much controversy sur- 
rounding the Confederate Battle Flag as 
well as the "X" symbol many people are 
wearing today. It seems these issues have 
swirled Uieir way into becoming a hot social 
and racial issue in the South. Opposing 
groups declare "Heritage, Not Hate," verses 
a single "X," which honors Malcolm X and 
his moves toward racial equality. Bodi of 
these symbols are tainted with racial history. 
What are our social responsibilities, and 
how are we lo be leaders in these issues of 
growing racial tension? I use the words 
"racial tension" carefully because I Uiink 
that before a problem can be solved, one 
must first recogni/e what he or she is deal- 
ing with. The Confederate Battle Rag flew 
over a nation that held human beings forc- 
ibly in bondage, based only on their skin 
color. The "X" symbol commemorates a 



man who supported racial equality enforced 
"by any means necessary." In both symbols, 
we find that violence abounds. 

What is really the point of these symbols? 
I see the Confederate Battle Flag as the flag 
that my forefathers fought under lo protect 
d^eirhome. This Hag has a symbolic, hon- 
orable meaning-in fighting for home, in 
fighting for what it meant to be a Soulhem 
Gentleman, and in fighting for other lofiy 
ideals. However, this view is not shared by 
all. Many people consider the Confederate 
BatUe Flag not as a symbol of honor but as 
a symbol of barbarism ; not commemorating 
attributes of a gentleman, but commemorat- 
ing attributes of a tyrant; not beholding lofty 
ideals, but beholding shallow, self-satisfy- 
ing, immoral positions against humankind. 
The cases are the same for the "X," except 
one mu.st note that Caucasians were never 
slaves in this land, as some of our fellow 



Americans' forefadiers were. 

It is in die sialcmcnt "not shared by all" 
dial our social responsibility resides. Our 
First Amendment rights gram us the righi to 
express ourselves, but is thai expression 
socially responsible if it dirtxUy alienates 
segments of our great nalKxi? 1 say no! We 
should find other symbols dial embody die 
g(X)d as-pects of whaiihcConlcdcratc Baltic 
Flag and die "X" stand fi)r without using 
symbols dial have die laini of racism. Even 
the honorable Robert E, Lee said dial he was 
opposed lo slavery; he l(X)k acommission in 
die CSA army because he could not fight 
against his home state of Virginia, Malcolm 
X did n(H believe wholcheanedly m violence, 
for dierc was no violent revolution. 1 make 
no argument dial die Conledorau- Battle 
Flag d(X's not suggest some gtxKl ideals. 
The "X" symbol, loo, has some gcxxl conno- 
tations of a just s(x leiy of equality between 



the races. We do need symbols dial stand for 
these ideas and which arc symbols of our 
heritage. Maybe wo cinild try the Hag of die 
United States of America ll is lime we 
uncloak die dark side of our past and present: 
slavery, violence, segregalion. racism, dis- 
cnmination.etc. ll is our social responsibil- 
ity lo make moves to honor our fellow men 
and women, to dissolve issues ol alienauon 
lo others, and to become people who are 
leaders of our generation in the fight against 
the ills imposed upon others, 1 have chosen 
not U) Hy my Confederate Battle I'lag, If you 
ch(X)se to Hy ycxir Hag or wear your "X" hat 
or shin, think first of how it mighi make 
someone else fe<l. Maybe exercising these 
rights would be best if done m private. 



The Blue Stocking of f^resbytcrian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVII. Number 5 
December 4, 1992 



Editor-in Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

News Editor ...Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

Sports Edilw Everette Calls 

Entertainment Editor Camisha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha l.ynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather Moncricf 

Photography Editor Kim Gibson 

Ijiyout Editor,. ., Angela Richardstm 



Advertising Editor Ann Mayficld 

Subscnptiuns Editor Ron Mixon 

Artist Michael Christensen 

Phatoj^raphy Staff 
Kimberlee Gibson Tcxkl Love 



Staff Writers 
Eli/abelh Cunard 
Ixigh Heamburg 
Kristina Pruitt 
Paula Warren 
Brian Sacco 
Kim Rabon 
r«)bm TiirruT 



Amanda Bowers 
Kalhenne Bonner 
Cher Fulbright 
MiihclleCanley 
Shelly Phipps 
Jainey Pale 
Tonya Snoa*! 



The Blue StfxIunK is a in weekly stmlent publi 
tationof PreslTylcnan College The pajKT serves 
as a forum of news and opmion of regional and 
national concern. For advertising, contact The 
Blue SKKking, Presbyterian ( "ollege, Box H)61 . 
Clinlon, SC 29^25 The Blue Sunlunff wd 
comes leUers lo the editor Irom all memlxTs of 
the PC community Signatures arc required. 
Letters are printetl on a spate available basis. 
The Blue Strnking reserves ihe right to edit all 
letters for [woper grammar and |)un( tuation 
The final deadline for submitting K-tiers is fri 
day at 12:(M)pmon the week before publication. 




Laurens resident 'dolls' up her house to celebrate Christmas season 



by Martha Lynn Smith 
FEATURES EDFTOR 

"It's beginning to look a lot like Clauses, and reindeer. Somewhere in there 
Christmas." she has a small box for donations. She also 

The sights and die sounds of the merriest permeates the night air with Christmas music, 
time of the year are 
abounding. "People 
laughing, children 
clapping," and die most 
famous house in Laurens 
"is dressed in holiday 
style." 

Those PC students 
who aren't familiar with 
Marie Snow's house in 
Laurens just haven 't been 
very observant when 
driving lo see a dollar 
movie or lo buy boxers at 
Bargain Bucks, 

Not dial one would 
have to be very observant. 
When Mane Snow 
daoraies her house for 
Chnsunas, she creates a 
.spectacle of music, lights, 
toys, and DOLLS dial is 
as festive as the season 
can possibly be, 

"I set all diis up at 
Thanksgiving," she told 
Ron Mixon and me when 
we interviewed her on 
Tuesday. It someumes 
takes two days for her to 
put diis ensemble logedier. 
"This year 1 had my 
nephew ccxne and help me 
widi die wmng," she laughs, thankfully 
nodding her blond head with a hairdo that 
matches dial of her dolls, 

Ms. Snow s dolls stand proudly among 
a menagerie of lights, tinsel, toy cats, Santa 




Laurens resident Marie Snow enjoys decorating her house for Christmas with a wide collection of dolls. Snow's 
decorative syle has been featured on several local television stations and on the "Real People" show. 



This year's selauon is the Andy Williams 
Chnstmas Album. 

"Boy," she said. "I'd love lo play Elvis, 
though." 

Ms. Snow has been collecung diese 



dolls all of her 47 years. The most prized angel on somebody's front lawn. I jusl look 
dolls of her collection are the ones dial she the icfca from dial," she said, 
received from her famdy when she was a 

There are just as many 
decorations inside the 
house as diere are outside. 
Christmas decorations 
abound, and on t\ery wall 
she has pictures of cats, 
Jesus, and Elvis. Ms. 
Snow's practice of decking 
die halls widi a little more 
than boi^hs of holly has 
made her a PC landmark 
and has earned her 
appearances on news 
shows throughout die stale 
and on die old TV show 
"Real Pcopte" 

Bui, unfortunately, the 
decoraticMis go down after 
Chnsunas. "Then 1 have to 
wash all die dolls' hair," 
she said. She said diat she 
fixes their hairstyles in the 
beehive to honor Pncilla 
Presley. 



And it'sall wordi iito Marie 
Snow. "1 enjoy die lights 
and decorations, but I really 
do all of this for the 
children." she said. "It 
makes them and me feel 
good." 

It really is beginning to look a kx like 
Christmas. 



child. Her inspiration for her yearly creauon 
came from die times she would ride around 
Greenvilk; widi her family and look at the 
Chnstmas decorauorLs, 

"I saw a doll that looked just like an 



PC students share their favorite Christmas traditions and customs 



by kim Kabon 

STAFF WRITI-R 

Amidst die unbearable su-ess of final 
exams, the writing of term papers, and end- 
of year organizational Chnsunas panics, 
which always seem toc(XTie ai one ume, K" 
students are sustained by thoughts of spec lal 
holiday events and u^iUons which give die 
season meaning, 

Traccy Piemi admits dial her favorite 
fiart of the holukiy season is die preparation, 
"1 enjoy baking CTinstmas ctxikies widi my 
mom," she says 

John Threadgill also likes the "getting 
ready" part of Chnstmas "Decorating die 
Ut'e IS my favonte aciiviiy of the season. 
Everyone gets ornaments dial have been 
collected for years and puts them on the lice 
llie uee is beauliful when Us finished," he 
says, 

A number ol students intlKated that 



being back 
home with 
family is 
I h e 1 r 
favorite part 
t 

Christmas, 
"Christmas 
IS when our 
whole 
family gels 
logcdierand 
It Lsn't a sad 
lime," said 
Jonathan 
Robmstin 

"1 love 
being with 
my fami 
and seeing 
friends thill 1 
have rH>t seen in a while 



'^ Elliot. 

Todd Johnson 
also enjoys 
being with 
family. "Tlw 
best part of die 
holidays is 
exchanging 
gifts on 

Chrisimas 
morning with 
my family," he 
says. 

According lo 
Kekcy Lucas, 
Grandma's 
house is the 
best place to 
have 
says Kadiym Chnsim.i*. "My favorite part of the holiday 




is having the whole family over at my 
Grandmother's house," he says. 

"We always exchange gifts and see 
relatives dial we haven't seen m a while," 
says Launc Fkming. 

Several stuiknts oijoy those traditions 
which occur on Chnstmas Eve. "The best 
part of Chnsunas for me is havmg my 
neighbor's family and my family togcdier 
on Chnstmas Eve," says Im TwomWy 

"My favorite pan of Chnstmas is die 
candlelight service at my church on 
Chnstmas Eve," said Chans.sa ClecklCT, 

Helen Moore adds that her family 
attends a Chnsunas service and then goes in 
search of lights. "After die service, my 
family and 1 nde around my neighborhood 
and look ai the Chnsimas lights," she says. 

No matter what y<Tu do diis Chnsunas, 
whether you arc with your family or friends, 
make sure that you enjoy your own ^locial 
holiday ir:»ditions 



ENTERTAINMENT 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1992 



SUB plans candlelight trip to Biltmore Estate 



by Canisha Clarke 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

Nearly a hundred years ago, George 
Vanderbilt welcomed guests into his home 
on Christmas Eve to share the warmih and 
spectacular wonder of his grand Victorian 
vacation home known as Biltmore Estate. 

Located in Asheville, North Carolina, 
the Biltmore Estate, with its tHMlitional sights 
and sounds of the season.coniinucs to extend 
the cordiality of a traditional Victorian 
Christmas. 

Continuing the tradition of the past three 
years, the Student Union Board (S U B) Travel 
Committee is sponsormg an evening 
candlelight visit to the Biltmore Estate this 
Sunday. With a maximum of 15 spaces 
available for PC students, SUB will be 



accepting names in the Sfwings office at the 
special group rate of S12 on a firsl-come- 
firsl-serve basis. Those who are going will 
leave from the Springs farking lot at 1:(X) 
pm and will return around 1 1 :00 pm Sunday 
night. 

Preceeding the candlelight tour, the 
students will indulge in a Victorian holiday 
feast at the Deerpark Restaurant. This full- 
course holiday meal rarcates the elegance 
of fine dining in Victorian fashion. 

Lee McAbee, SUB Travel Committe 
Chairperson, is expecting an enriching 
"cultural experience" with all the ameniues 
of the season: the warm glow of candles, 
rich velvet nbbon, and evergreen garnish 
banisters. 



Returning to Biltmore will be 
reminiscent of sweet childhood days for 
those who have already experienced its 
warmth. Senior Angela Mills, who visited 
the estate every year with her family as a 
child, said, "It was like a fau7tale. I half 
expected to find a prince." 

Although Senior Erica Durham has 
never visited the estate during Christmas, 
she docs recall the "majeclic" appearance of 
the estate and looks forward to reluming. 

Don't miss the dozens of flickenng 
luminaries, the delicate, hand-made 
omamenLs, and the aromas of fresh spices 
and flowers at the Bilunorc Estate. Today 
may be your last chance! 



ss^^^^^iB^^is^tmfmimms^'^-s^iRiRiEf^^e'a'fl'^w^^S'^^s^^iR^^ 



Christmas 
service to be 
held 

The annual Presbyterian College 
Chnstmas Candlelight Service will be held 
on Wedesday, December 9, at 7:30 pm in 
Belk Auditorium. 

According to KThaplain Greg Henley, 
the addition of a live, outdoor nativity scene 
will make the service even more special. 
"This year, following the auditon um service, 
students will make their way to the plaza and 
form a conccnuic circle around the outdoor 
nativity scene and sing carols. This w ill also 
be the time wc have our candlelight service," 
said Henley. 

Following the candlelight service, a 
reception will be hosted by PC F*residentand 
Mrs. Ken B. Or. Everyone is invited to 
partake of Christmas cookies and cider. 

"We always look forward to the annual 
Christmas Candlelight Service because it 
signals the end of the academic year, but 
more importantly it signals the beginning of 
Advent and the celebration of the buih of 
Christ," said Henley. 



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1993 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVII Numba6 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton. South Carolina 29325 



Fnday, January 29, 1993 



1993 commencement set for outdoors 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

MANAGING EDITOR 

After months of student exhortation 
and committee consideration, the officers of 
the college have approved plans for an 
outdoor graduation this May. The ceremony 
will take place on the west plaza between 
Neville Hall and South Broad Street. 

Following a mc<;ung of the Board of 
Tru.stecs last semester, President Ken Orr 
establishcdaia.sk fcxce to study the feasibility 
of the long-debated idea of outdoor 
graduation. 

For years, complamLs have been heard 
about the uncomfortable scaling 
arrangements and heat which make 
graduation in the gymnasium an unpleasant 
affair. The committee, composed of three 
stutknLs and seven members of the faculty 
and adminisuation, voted ummimously on 
January 1 1 to recommended that 
commencement be held outd(H)rs. The 
following day, the officers of the college 
accepted the propo.sal, putting the wheels 
into mouon. 

"We deliberately selected committee 
members who represented various facets of 
ihe college community," said Margaret 
Willliamson, vice-president for enrollment 
and dean of admissions, who served as the 
committee chair. "1 think everybody was 
open and that we had honest discussions. 
Although the committee realizes that there 
are some details that need to be worked out, 
the overall concensus was that this is a good 
lime to try ouldcx)r graduation." 

According to the provisions of the 
committee recommendation, the weekend 
fesuvities will begin on Friday aftemcxin at 
5:30 with the senior barbeque m the dining 
hall. The uadilional senior program will 
take place at l.M) pm that evening in Belk 
Auditorium. 

The ROTC Commissioning Ceremony 
at 9:(X) am on Saturday morning will be 
followed by thell:(X) am Baccalaureate 
Service. Lunch will be served in GDM fmm 



12 to 2:00 pm, followed by an honor 
ceremony in Edmunds Hall at 2:30 pm, 
during which cords will be distributed to 
those seniors graduating with honors. 
Graduation will begin at 4:00 pm, and a 
reception will be held after the ceremony in 
front of Edmunds Hall. 

In an attempt to ensure that parents and 
close family members will have access to 
prime seating, each senior will be issued 
four tJC kets for a reserved seating area. There 
is no limit, however, on the number of 
people who may attend. 

In the event of rain, commencement 
will be moved to its traditional location in 
Templcion Gymnasium. The four-ticket 
policy would still apply, and the remaining 
.seats would be open on a lirsi-come, fust- 
serve basis 

Presbyterian College has not held a 
graduation ceremony outdoors since 1960, 
until which time two decades of graduates 
had received their diplomas at the former 
campus landmiu^k, J(Kk Rock. 

Members of the Class of 1993, pleased 
about being the first class to revive the 
tradition, have applauded the decision of the 
officers. 

"It's great that we're finally utilizing a 
campus we spend so much money 
beautifying," said Senior Christy Hermann. 

Kathy Creech added, "I think it's great 
because more people can attend, and they 
won't be so cramfx^d and hot." 

Student members of the task force were 
pleased wiih the o|Km-minded atmosphere 
of the di.scussions. "After being involved 
with these efforts for three years, I'm happy 
to sec that the students' views are finally 
being heard by the administration," said 
SGA President Michael M.»run. Hecrcdited 
Senior Class President Wendy Hubbard for 
the success of the proptisal. 

There will be a meeting of the Senior 
Cla.ss on Tuesday , February 2, at 4: 30 on the 
second flcx)rofSpnngstodiscuss graduation 
details. 




PC jNnior Ain> Latiff prov« her strength by lining Avery Cheves. 
Latiff and Cheves joined In tbe fun on Bid Day '93. 

photo by Lauren Owir^s 



Suspicious individual causes concern on campus 



On The Inside 



Page 5 . . . 

Ground Hog Day - What are you 
doing to celebrate? 



bv l>ejeanna Maddox 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Several students have expressed 
concerns ab<Hit encounters they have had 
with an unfamiliar, suspicious individual on 
campus in the past week. 

The individual, described as a white 
male with dark hair, approximately .SO yearx 
old, 5' 10", and weighing about 20() ptninds, 
was first seen sitting in his car outside of 
Templcion Gymiwsium last week Because 
the car was illegally parked, a PC I*ublic 
Safely officer approahed the man, who 
then left the scene. The officer was, however. 



able to ascertain the vehicle uig number. 

Later that week, a female student 
reported seeing a man fitting thatdescnption 
outside of the women's dormitory comple.x, 
asking questions about the dorms. 

He was spotted again by a female student 
this past Mimday night at approximately 
10:30 pm and has also been seen near the 
administration building,CiDH, and the d(wm 
parking lots. He reportedly has asked a 
number of female students abi>ul where they 
live and in w hat activiues they partic ipate on 
campus. 

"We are aware of who this man is," said 
Public Safety Chief Grey Mayson "My 



office sent a letter to the individual, informing 
him not to come on this campus again. He 
was warned that if he dixjs. he will be arresKxl 
on sight." 

Mayson rep(^rts that the suspected 
individual came to his office Wednesday to 
speak with him in response to the letter he 
had raeived. "The individual injected to 
our telling him not to come on campus any 
more. I made il ctear to him that if he were 
to come on campus again, he would be 
arrested," Mayst)n said. 

Although Mayson does not expect any 
additional problems from him. Public Saf^y 
has taken measures to heighten security. 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume LXXXVII Nunibei6 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE Clinton, South Carolina 29325 



Friday, January 29, 1993 



1993 commencement set for outdoors 



by Lejeanna Maddox 

MANAGING EDITOR 

After monlhs of student exhortation 
and committee consideration, the officers of 
the college have approved plans for an 
outdoor graduation this May. The ceremony 
will take place on the west pla/a between 
Neville Hall and South Broad Street. 

Following a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees last semester. President Ken Orr 
esiabi ished a task force to study the feasibil ity 
of the long-debated idea of outdoor 
graduation. 

For years, complaints have been heard 
about the uncomfortable seating 
arrangements and heal which make 
graduation in the gymnasium an unpleasiint 
affair. The commiiiee, c(>mfx)scd of three 
students and seven members of the faculty 
and admimsuation, voted unanimously on 
January 1 1 to recommended that 
commencement be held ouid(H)rs. The 
following day, the officers of the college 
accepted the proptisal, pulling the wheels 
into motion. 

"We deliberately selected committee 
members who represented various facets of 
the college community, " said Margaret 
Willliamson, vice-president for enrollment 
and dean of admissions, who served as the 
commitiee chair. "I think everybody was 
open and thai wc had honest discussions. 
Although the committee reali/es that there 
are some details that need lo be worked out, 
the overall concensus was ihat this is a g(Kxl 
time lo \ry ould(X)r graduation." 

According lo the provisions of the 
commitiee recommendauon, the weekend 
fcsuviiies will begin on Friday aliemtx>n at 
5:30 wiih the senior bark'que in the dining 
hall. The traditional senior program will 
take place at 7:. 10 pm that evening in Belk 
Auditorium. 

ITie ROTC Commissioning Ceremony 
at 9:(X) am on Saturday morning will be 
followed by ihcll:(X) am Baccalaureate 
Service. Lunch will be served in GDH from 



12 to 2:00 pm, followed by an honor 
ceremony in Edmunds Hall at 2:30 pm, 
during which cords will be disuibuted to 
those seniors graduating with honors. 
Graduation will begin at 4:(X) pm, and a 
raeption will be held after the ceremony in 
front of Edmunds Hall. 

In an attempt to ensure that parents and 
close family members will have access to 
prime sealing, each senior will be issued 
four uckcts for a reserved seating area. There 
is no limit, however, on the number of 
people who may attend. 

In the event of rain, commencement 
Will be moved to its traditional location in 
Tcmplclon Gymnasium. The four-ticket 
pt)licy would slill apply, and the remaining 
scats would be open on a first-comc, fu'st- 
scrve basis 

Presbyterian College has not held a 
graduation ceremony ouldix)rs since 1^)60, 
until which lime two decades ot graduates 
had received their diplomas at the former 
campus landmark, J(Kk Rcxk. 

Members of ihc Class of 1 W3, pleased 
about being the first class to revive the 
tradition, have applauded the decision of the 
officers. 

"It's great that we're finally utilizing a 
campus wc spend so much money 
beautilying," said Senior Christy Hermann. 

Kaihy Creech added, "1 think it's great 
because more people can attend, and they 
won't be so cramjvd and hoi." 

Student members of the task force were 
pleased wiih the open-minded atmosphere 
of the di.scussions. "After being involved 
with these efforts for three years, I'm happy 
to sec ihal the students' views are finally 
being heard by ilie administration," said 
SGA President Michael Marun. He credited 
Senior Class President Wendy Hubbard for 
the success of the proposal. 

There will be a meeting of the Senior 
Class on Tuesday , February 2 , at 4 : 30 on the 
second fl(X)rof Springs lo discuss graduation 
details. 



■iM^PPIStl'W^BW^IiWBBBPBBWHP 







PC Jttnbr Amy Latiff prov^ her sfrtn^ ky lifting Avery Chcvfs. 
LatifT and Cheves joined in the fun on Bid Day '93. 

phoio ky Lawtn Owings 



Suspicious individual causes concern on campus 



On The Inside 



Page 5 . . . 

Ground Hog Day - What are you 
doing to celebrate? 



bv Lejeanna Maddox 

MANAGING EDITOR 

Several students have expressed 
concerns about encounters they have had 
with an unfamiliar, suspicious individual on 
campus in ihe past week. 

The individual, destribed as a white 
male with dark hair, approxiitiaiely 50 years 
old, .*)' 10 ", and weighing about 2(K) pounds, 
was first seen silling in his car outside of 
Templelon Gymnasium last week. Because 
ihc car was illegally piirked, a K" Public 
Safely officer approiiched the man, who 
ihen left the scene. The officer w as, however. 



able to ascertain the vehicle tag number. 

Later ihai week, a female student 
rcjxincd seeing a man fitting that descnption 
outside of the womcn'sdormiiory complex, 
asking questions about the dorms. 

He was spotted again by a female student 
this past Monday night at approximately 
10:30 pm and has also been .seen near the 
adminisiralionbuilding,CiDH, and the dorm 
parking lots. He reportedly has asked a 
number of female students abcnii where they 
live and in what activiues they participate on 
campus. 

"We are aware of who this man is," said 
Public Safely Chief Grey Mayson "My 



office sent a letter to the individual, informing 
him not to come on this campus again. He 
was wanvd that if he does,he will be arrested 
on sight" 

Mayson reports that the suspected 
individual came to his office Wednesday to 
speak with him in response lo the letter he 
had racived. "The individual ob^lcd to 
our telling him not to come on camjxis any 
more. 1 made it clear to him that if he were 
to cone on camjHis again, he would be 
arrested, " Mayson said. 

Although Mayson does not expect any 
additional problems from him. PuWk Safety 
has taken measures to heighten security. 



EDITORIAL 



I-RIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



Outdoor graduation became a reality because the administration 'list^ened' 



by Jason West 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

The other day I was breezing through 
Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictio- 
nary, and I came across an interesting word 
- listen. Listen is defined as hearing some- 
thing with thoughtful attention and consid- 
eration. 

There are times when I have been guilty 
of not listening to others. Often, I limit my 
focus and scope and just concentrate on the 
issues and concerns that are in front of me, 
never considering the views from the sides 
or the rear. I am sure that I'm not the only 
person in the world whodoesn'tlisten. If the 
truth were told, I am positive that 100 per- 
cent of the world's population would find 
themselves in the same predicament. 

As a student and a young person, I have 
frequently observed that not very many 
people over the age of 30 listen to my ideas 
or concerns. I find that I sometimes hold a 
certain contempt for idministrators, teach- 
ers, and parents who tell me what to do, 
when to do it, and how high I must jump 
when I am instructed. However, there are 
those rare moments when adults do listen 



and pay close attention. outdoor graduation to the officers of the 

Recently, the administration of Presby- college. On Monday o( this week, the offit- 

terian College agreed to the concept of an ers of the college approved the concept. 
outdoor 



"Eternal agreement, rubber stamping, 
and failure to ask questions are not a part 
of the listening process." 



graduation. 
Students have 
been unsuc- 
cessful 1 y 
pushing for 
outdoor 
graduation for 
years, only to 

be disap- ^"-^ — — 

pointed that no 

one was wilUng to listen. This year, the 
administration decided to sit down with 
students and talk. 

Under the direction of Margaret 
Williamson, PC's vice president for enroll- 
ment, acommiitee consisting of administra 



Thcadinmisira- 
tion is to be 
commended for 
Its willingness 
to have dia- 
logue with stu- 
dents. .Sitting 
down and lalk- 

-^ mg IS al ways the 

best soluuon it) 
any problem. The students successfully 
argued their case for ouid(X)r graduation, 
presented well-re.scarched facts and sugges- 
tions, and listened to the conccms and ob- 
jections of some members of tk faculty. In 
return, the adminisuation and faculty prc- 



tors. faculty, and students was formed to scnted their argumenLs, listened, made sue 



discuss the possibilities of outdoor gradua 
tion. The group met, pondered all the 
possibilites and the potential problems, lis- 
tened to each other's ideas, and made a 
decision. The decision was to recommend 



gestions of compromise, and were appar- 
ently swayed by the students. 

My beliefs about certain topics do not 
necessarily make my opinion the only one 
that IS correct Of course, in moments of 



heated debate. I doubt that I would make that 
claim. The fact that someone listens to you 
d(x^s not mean that you will always be cor- 
rat. A person could listen intently and 
without prejudice to another's arguments 
for days and days and sull come to the 
conclusion that the argument is wrong. 

As students, we should not expext that 
every time there is a conuoversy or prob- 
lem, the administration must agree with us. 
Ktcmal agreement, rubber stamping, and 
failure to ask questions are not a part of the 
listening pnxess. However, it should be 
noted that the adult leaders of this campus 
should always listen objectively and fairly 
to student concerns. 

Again, I congratulate the administra- 
tion tor listening and agreeing to outdoor 
graduation. 

I also remind VQ students that the next 
time we don't get our way, we should prcMn- 
isc to refrain from poutjng and throwing 
temper tantrums. They are al.so not a part of 
the listening prwess. 



Letter to the Rditor 



Dear Editor 



I find something at this school very 
frightening. 

In the first issue of last semester, the 
Blue Stocking reported the official crime 
statistics from last year according to the 
Administration and Public Safety. Accord- 
ing U) these statistics, a total of one, or if not 
one, some other ridiculously low number of 
robbenes occurred last year. This of course 
had the desired effect of making us all feel 
warm and safe in our college environment 

Last semester I received a notice in my 
box reminding me to lock my door and 
windows before leaving for Thanksgiving 
break, or any break, for that matter. This 
nouce also .stated that around $ 1 5 ,000 worth 
of property was stolen from those who for- 
got to lock their rooms last year before 
leaving for break. 

Then a revelation hit me. What one 



object, worth $ 1 5 ,000. mind you, could have 
been stolen from a dorm room in our one 
reported robbery? 

I struggled long and hard with this 
question and finally came up with a few 
possible explanations: 

A) Someone parked theu^car in their room in 
an effort to protect it, forgot to lock an 
enu-ance, and it was stolen. 

B) Someone lefi their door unlocked and 
their daddy's Gold Card on the desk (Need 
I say more?). 

C) Someone reported 3 or 4 kilos of cocaine 
stolen. 

D) Someone lied to us. 

I welcome and hope for an explanation. 

Sincerely, 
Jason Bundrick 



The following poem, which appeared in the November '92 issue of Commumiy Con- 
nections, was submitted by Camisha Clarke to be placed on the editorial page 

Rich, White. Straight Male America Responds to AIDS 

First, it went after the queers, and 1 said nothing, because 1 was no queer, 
men It went after the druggies, and I said nothing, because 1 was no 
druugie. ^ 

Then it went after the coloreds, and 1 said nothing, becau.se I was no 
colored. 

Then it went after women, and 1 s;ud nothing, baause I was a man. 

And when it finally got me, there was no one left 

Period. 



The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVII. Number 6 
January 29, 1993 



Editor in-Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

Sporu Editor Everette Calls 

Enlertainmeni Editor Camisha Clarke 

Featiffes Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather Moncrief 

Photography Editor Kim Gibson 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



Advertising Editor Ann Mayfield 

SulKcriptions Editor Ron Mixon 

Arust Michael Chnstensen 

Photography Staff 
Kimberlee Gibson Todd Love 



Staff Writers 
Elizabeth Cunard 
Leigh Heamburg 
Kristina PruiU 
Paula Wanen 
Bnan Sacco 
Kim Rabon 
Tobin Turner 



Amanda Bowers 
Katherine Bonner 
Cher Fulbrighl 
Michelle Canley 
Shelly Phipps 
Jamey Pale 
Tonya Sneml 



The Blue StcKking is a in weekly student publi 

cationofPresbytenanCollegc. The pa|)cr serves 
as a forum of news and opmion of regK)nal and 
national concern. For advertising, coniact The 
Blue Skm: lung. Presbyterian College. Box 1061 
Chnton. SC 29325, The Blue Sim lung wel' 
comes leuers to the editor from all members of 
the PC community. .Signaluies arc required. 
Letters are prmlal on a spa^e available basis. 
The Blue Stoiking reserves the righl to edii all 
letters for proper grammar and punctuation 
The final deadline for subiniliing Iclleis is Fri 
dayal I2:(K)pmon the week before publicalion 




FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



NEWS 




Ice storm creates overtime for maintenance 
Weakened branches pose threat to students 

by Tobin Turner 
STAFF WRITER 



Fallen tree limbs 
of Clinton. 



and branches from recent ice storm can still be seen on the streets 

photo by Kim Gibson 



Two weeks before PC students relumed 
to campus from Christmas vacation, freezing 
temperatures and heavy precipitation 
resulted in an ice storm that enveloped the 
campus and the town of Clinton. Fallen tree 
limbs and other damages from the storm can 
still be seen around the campus and on the 
streets of town. 

"In all my 79 years, I have never seen a 
storm like that one," said Clintonian and 
GDH receptionist Zona Dutton. 

Power lines and cable lines were 
snapped by the weight of the sleet and 
freezingrain. The most obvious effect of the 
storm was the avalanche of fallen uees and 
limbs. OnPC'sfrontplaza, 12truckloadsof 
fu^ewood and three truckloads of limbs were 
gathered as a result of the storm. 

PC's maintenance crew has already put 



in nearly 700 hours of work in cleaning up 
after the storm. The maintenance department 
is also concerned about weakened branches 
that still remain in trees. These branches 
pose a threat to pedestrians, power lines, and 
buildings. 

According to Mac Stewart, director of 
grounds, crews have been removing as many 
branches as possible with a "bucket" truck, 
but eventually a tree company will have to 
be called in to remove the limbs that are the 
highest and most difficult to rtdch. 

"PC was certainly lucky that no major 
damage was sustained by any buildings on 
campus," said Stewart. 

Stewart repwis that the clean-up effort 
will certainly not be cheap. "It is too early 
to figure how much money will be spent on 
clean-up, but it will be really expensive, " he 
added. 



Fraternity rush numbers down from last year 



by Rickv Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 

The 1993 fraternity rush for freshmen 
is close to completion. This year 89 
freshmen signed up for rush; however, ten 
of these rushecs were unable to pledge a 
fraternity since they did not maintain a 2.0 
GPA last semester. The total number of 
rushers was 79, which is down from 88 
last year. 

Allen Jacobs, president of the 
Interfratemity Council (IFC) believes that 
deferred rush is responsible for the decline 
in rush participation. "The numbers are 
down due to deferred rush, because many 
freshmen are not making the grades. 
Others are becoming more involved with 
other sch(xM activities and organi/.ations," 
said Jacobs. 

Jacobs also credits deferred rush for 
IPC's adoption of new rules and its 
strengthening of others. 

One new rule enforced by IFC this 
year was the banning of band parties at 



individual fraternity houses. Jacobs said 
that the council felt freshmen were given the 
opportunity to see the types of band parlies 
each fratemiiy uses during the fall semester. 

"There was really no point in spending 
the money for bands just to try and win 
freshmen over." said Jacobs. "This rule was 
needed to make rush more fau- for all the 
fratemiues on campus." 

Shortening rush to three days was 
another rule change invoked by IFC. 
According to J^Kobs, the council felt that 
many freshmen had had the opportunity to 
meet fraternity members during the fall, and 
a long rush would become monotwious. 

One major change in rush this year was 
the enforcement of "dry" rush, which in the 
p-dsi has not been taken seriously. However, 
IFC chose to enforce the policies on alcohol 
violations this ye^. Jacobs reports that only 
one violation by a fraternity occurred during 
'93 nish. 



"When rush is deferred and freshmen 
have already had a semester to see the 
party side of fraternities, it is necessary 
for them to see the service and brotherhood 
side. That is why the IFC pushed for a 100 
percent dry rush," said Jacobs. 

"Improvements can be made, but I 
was very happy with how rush went, and 
I believe most freshmen were too," added 
Jacobs. 

Will Holmes, president of Sigma Nu, 
agreed with Jacobs that spring msh had 
been successful, but he did see problems. 
"I was disappointed with the turnout of 
freshmen, but I realize dial this is due to 
deferred rush and the failure of freshmen 
to make the necessary grades. I do believe 
the new rules worked effectively for the 
benefit of all fralemilies who followed 
the guidelines," he said. 




r 



MR A f'lihtM SwvH » ot (h» IISOA fowsl S»fviir 



Hickory Hills 
Bar-B-Que 

Old Laurens Rd. 
Clinton, SC 29325 
833-2690 




"Carolina s Finest" 



Attention All PC Students! 
Take A Bar-B-Que Break! 

All PC students receive a 10% 

discount on our dining buffet every 

Thursday night with valid ID. 

"All You Care To Eat!" 



Women's doors to 
be locked from 
dusk to dawn 

by Jason West 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Starting next week, PC's women's 
residence halls will be locked from dusk to 
dawn. That annoucemeni comes after 
months of discussion and debate concerning 
the safety of women's dorms on the 
Presbyterian College campus. 

CurrenUy, all women's residence halls 
have an electronic security system which 
locks the doors at midnight ami unkxks 
them at 6.00 am. Under ihe new system, the 
dorms will lock automatically at 7:00 pm 
and will unlock at 7:00 am. Theonlywayto 
gain entrance into die female dorms during 
the hours diey are locked will be with a dorm 
card. Each female student's dorm card will 
work in all of the women's residence halls. 

"The decision to lock die doors earlier 
was primarily made with the safely and 
health of PC women in mind," said Joe 
Nixon, dean of students. "Every day across 
the nation a female student is assualted in a 
residence hall. Wedon'twanldiis to happen 
to our students." 

Nixon cues that the pnmary reason for 
the dusk to dawn secunty system is for ilw 
safety of students; however, he admits that 
the liability of the college was another factor 
in the decision. 

"We do have to consider liability issues. 
After all, what happens if the colkgc ls sued 
for millions of dollars over an issue that 
could have been prevented? Tuition wtxild 
go up and admissions would have a more 
difficult lime recruiting students," said 
NixOT. 

Nixon slates dial it is important for 
female students to report if ihcu- dorm card 
is lost or is ever lost. "The loss of a dorm 
card should be immediately reported to the 
Residence Life Office or Public Safety." he 
added. 

"I apologize for any inconvenience, but 
a slight inconvenience may someday save i 
student's life, ' said Nixon. 



NEWS 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



PC 



Tidbiis 



Group plans trip to Russia 

A trip is being planned to the former 
Soviet Union for May 24 through June 8, 
1993. Students from Presbyterian College 
and Samford University in Birmingham, 
Alabama are being invited to participate. 
The trip will include stops in Tallin, 
Estonia, St. Petersburg, and Moscow. 

The cost of the Dip is set at S2338 and 
will cover the following: air transportation 
from New York to Europe, three meals 
per day in Russian and Estonian cities, 
accommodations in tourist-class hotels, 
transportation between cities in Europe, 
group sight-seeing, transfers fromAo hotels 
and porterage of one suitcase per person, 
and all required taxes and tips. Cost does 
not include u-ansportaiion to and from 
New York, passport, Russian visa, or the 
$21 US (teparture tax. 

PC students may earn three semester 
hours by participating in the trip. The 
deadline for posting a $250 deposit is 
March 15. The balance will be due by 
April 1. Both schools are limited in the 
number of people they may include. PC's 
quota will likely be no larger than lOio 1 1 
students. For more information, see Dr. 
David Gillespie. 

SCSL taking applications 

The South Carolina Student 
Legislature (SCSL) is receiving 
applications for membership fcM- nextyear. 
SCSL is a bi-partisan group which 
discusses and debates political topics and 
also spends time at the South Carolina 
StateCapitolinihefall. Interested students 
should contact Leslie Chambers at 8769. 

Peer Connectors open office 

College is a time for exploration and 
change. It can also be a time of confusion 
and conflict of values. Sometimes, it 
helps to talk to another student about the 
problems that you f^e. Peer Connectors 
are uained and mistwonhy students who 
are there to help. Peer Connectors can be 
reached in the bascmeniof Douglas House 
(fomierly the CIA room) from 8;(K) pm to 
10:00 pm, Sunday through Wednesday. 
Call 8424 or drop by for a visit. 

HFH worktrips scheduled 

Habitat for Humanity spon.sors 
worktrips every Saturday in Laurens. 
Contact Ron Hull (8110) if you'd like to 
help. The first campus chapter meeting 
this semester will be Wednesday . February 
3, at 7:00 pm in Crossroads. 

Study seminar offered 

The Office of Career Planning and 
Pliccment will be sponsoring a seminar 
offering tips on time management, study 
ski lis, and note-taking ski lis. TIk seminar 
will be held on Sunday, February 7 at 7:(X) 
pm in Room 23 1 of Douglas House, For 
more information, call Extention 8379. 



Presbyterian College begins search for new registrar 



by Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 

The first semester of 1993 has 
been fairly hectic for the Registrar's 
office, due to the absence of Bill 
Gash. Gash, who was in his fourth 
year as the Assistant Academic Dean 
and Director of Student Records, 
resigned last month to take a job in 
his home state of North Carolina. 

The vacancy left by Gash has 
not been filled. According to Bill 
Moncrief, vice president for 
academic affairs, PC has begun to 
advertise the job opening in such 
publications as the Chronicle of 
Higher Education, a national 
newspaper which lists virtually 




Dr. Bill Moncrief filepk 



oto 



every job have been filled by now. "It would 

position be nice to have a new registrar, but 

available it is extremely important to choose 

ai colleges the right person with the credentials 

and necessary to fulfill the position," he 

universities said. 

throughout [3ue to PC's decision to upgrade 

the United ilie college's computer system for 

^I'li'^"^ student records, applicants for 
registrar will be interviewed by 

Moncrief Moncrief and a professor from the 

stated he computer science department. The 

would have reviewing process for applicants 

liked tor will begin on February 1. 

Gash's Applications will continue to be 

position to accepted until the position is filled. 



Semester of study in China offered to PC students 



by Ron Rurnside 

GUEST WRI'ItR 

Presbyterian College students will have 
the opportunity to study in China in the fall 
semester of 1 993 in a program offered by the 
South Atlantic States Association for Asian 
and African Studies. The program will be 
administered by Wake Forest UnivcRity 
and will be based at Beijing Foreign 
Languages Normal College. 

A student will earn 16 hours of credit, 
10 of which will be in Chinese language. In 
addition to the language course, the students 
will take two other courses, which will bo 
taught in English. China in Perspective is a 
survey course taught by Chinese scholars 
and is designed to increase the student's 
understanding of various aspects of Chinese 
culture. Problems in Contemporary Chinese 
Politics will be taught by a member of the 
faculty of Wake Forest University who will 
also serve as rcsidcntdirector of the program. 

In addition to course work, there will be 
a variety of activities and excursions in and 
around Beijing. Students will have the 
opportunity to attend theatrical 
performances, films, and opera as well as to 
visit factories, museums, ncighb()rh(X)d 
communitees, temples, the Great Wall, tlic 
Ming Tombs, and festival celebrations. 

The cost of the program is approximately 
$6420 andincludesorientati()n,r(H)m, board, 
tuition, organized cultural excursions, 
textb(X)ks and other educational materials, 
visa fees, and roiind-tnp airf;ire . The program 
will be competitive, and students must submit 
applications by February 8. Students should 
have a minimum GPA of 2.8, demonsu-ated 
ability in foreign language study, and serious 
interest in the study of Chinese culture. 

Students should contact Dr. Burnside at 
extention 8.158 or 83.1-0184 for more 
information or for application forms 
Students may also contact the following 
students who have participated in the 
program: Sally Brady, Michael Martin. Ted 
Carmichael, Chris Adair, PnceTimmerman, 
Josh Elrod and Jason Whitener. 




study in the People's Republic. 



visit if they 

photo hy Ron 



choose to 

Burnside 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



FEATURES 



Students get first 
'bitter prejudices' 



-hand look at the 
of Middle East life 



by Martha Lynn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Taking their education from the front 
seats of a poliucal science classrcwm to the 
front lines of the divided West Bank, K? 
students Catherine Ray and Kathyrn 
Spearman spent an cye-opening summer in 
the Middle East. 

While taking classes at an International 
Summer Program at Bir/eit University, Ray, 
ajunior from Bamwell, South Carolina, and 
Speannan.aseniorfromSummcrvillc, South 
Carolina, .saw first-hand the stringent 
divisions between Palestinians and l.sraelis. 

S ince I %7 Palestinians have been u^ing 
to regain their homeland on the West Bank 
of the Jordan River from Israeli occupation. 

Ray and Spearman were observant 
witnesses to the political strife. "The 
prejudices were bitter, " Spearman said. "11 
there wasa blank wall, it wasn't long before 
it was covered with grafilii." 

Inanyiemiory under IsraelicKCupaUon, 
it is illegal to have the Palestinian (lag, or to 
even display its colors together on a shirt or 
oiherarticleof clothing. Anyone found with 
any kind of PLC) material nsks imprisonment 
for 180 days without anyone being notified. 

"The United Slates has a tendency to 
sympathize with the Israelis, but 1 ihink 
things are starting to shiti," noted Ray. 



Bir/eit University is an independent 
Palestinian institution thai has been under 
military occupation since 1%7. According 
to some stiurces, the Israelis periodically 
close down the university to punish 
Palestinian student dcmonsu^ators, to hinder 
their education, and lo desuoy their morale. 
It was just reopened last summer after being 
closed lor four years. 

During their study, the K' students 
witnessed many demonstrations ai the 
university; and m the University Campus 
Center, they saw pictures memorializing 
martyred Palestinian protestors. 

The .students t(X)k twoclasscs: a poliucal 
.science course entitled "The Palestinia 
Problem," and a .sociology course entitled 
"Palestine Under Occupation." Two Arabic 
language courses were also available. 

Dr. Tom Weaver, a.s.sociaie professor 
of political scienceaiPC, did hisdissertaiion 
research at Birzeit University. He is now 
negoiiaung for a possible student exchange 
program. 

"You have to understand that this is not 
a typical study abroad opportunity ." Weaver 
said. "It's a big step for iwo students to go 
to a ITiird World environment. Adding 
military occu|wtion to the equation makes it 
anevcngreaierchallenge. 1 have the greatest 
admiraiion for them." 




Kathryn Spearman tieft), Irish student JoAnn Murphy, and Catherine Ray take in 
the sights at Qumran, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered. photo by Ray 



Congratulations ! 



'Beth 'Blair 
trin (Dains 
Cobi Sfuife 
%e[(y Tope 
Sallij "Moore 
Clare Tojahl 
tmiiy (Meyers 
Lifnne Turman 
'Bcstif 'BrumBif 
'J(iiren 'Jrierson 
%athr^n Massey 
Laura Severinsen 
Xee IXhiiuespack, 




Ike Wirt 
Liz 'Duf^ 
J^mi Titts 
Shanna '.Holt 
Lauren'Jonts 
Liz. iVfiitfield 
Allison Steen 
Jennifer 9{saU 
%athryn lones 
Suzanne lowers 
J^lyssa 'Pinl^erton 
Christine Massey 
Idzabetfi Ciriffith 



'Kara 9{emen-niay 



Zeta ^au ^[-pha 



Fate of new season depends on groundhog 

by Kim Rabon 

STAFF WRITER 

In a world of scientific technology, no Candlemas in England and Germany, 
one seems to place much credence in the However, the star of the show is a badger or 
ground hog's predicuons these days. But bear instead of a groundhog. Ifthcskiesare 
after weeks of endlessly dreary weather, he fair and bright, winter storms will certainly 
may be our last hope. come. But if the weather is rainy and wet, 

The tradition of groundhog day was winter weather has come and gone, 
introduced lo America by immigrants from The first observance of Groundhog Day 

took place on 
February 2, 1908. 
Each year since 
then, hundreds of 
dedicated 
groundhog 
watchers have 
gone in search of 
the groundhog's 
burrow in 

Quarry villc. 



Germany and 
Great Britain. 
They believed 
that It was a 
means of 

forecasting the 
weather for the 
subsequent six 
weeks. 

According 
to legend, the 

groundhog awakens from its long winter Pennsylvania to watch its reaction to the 
sleep on F-ebmary 2, at which time it comes weather. After watching the groundhog, the 
out of Its hole and kx)ks around. If the sun observers return to town and report their 
is shining and the groundhog can see its observations to the chauroanofthc Board of 
shatk)w. It is frightened and goes back into HibcmatingGovcmors.whoihenannounces 
Its hole, signifying six more weeksof winter to the world that the groundhog has or has 




IIASY 



weather. 

If the day is cloudy and the groundhog 
cannot see its shatk)w, it stays out of its hole, 
indicaung that s{Tring weather will arrive 
s(X)n. Although the uadition has grown in 
popularity, scientific evidence has not 
confimicd the groundhog talc. 

Groundhog Day is also celebrated as 



not seen its shadow. 

Different groups of grt>undhog kivers 
celebrate the holiday in different ways. Some 
start With groundhog banquets and breakfa.sl 
and end w iih a ce Icbraiion ot the gnxindhog ' s 
reaction. So the question is, how will you 
celebrate? 



NEWS 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 29, 1993 



PC 



Tidbits 



Group plans trip to Russia 

A trip is being planned to the former 
Soviet Union for May 24 through June 8, 
1993. Students from Presbyterian College 
and Samford University in Birmingham, 
Alabama are being invited to participate. 
The trip will include stops in Tallin, 
Estonia, St. Petersburg, and Moscow. 

The cost of the trip is set at $2338 and 
will coverthe following: air transportation 
from New York to Europe, three meals 
per day in Russian and Estonian cities, 
accommodations in tourist-class hotels, 
transportation between cities in Europe, 
group sight-seeing, transfers frwn/to hotels 
and porterage of one suitcase per person, 
and all required taxes and tips. Cost does 
not include transportation to and from 
New York, passport, Russian visa, or the 
$21 US departure tax. 

PC students may earn three semester 
hours by participating in the trip. The 
deadline for posting a $250 deposit is 
March 15. The balance will be due by 
April 1. Both schools are limited in the 
number of people they may include. PC's 
quota will likely be no larger than 10 to 1 1 
stucfcnts. For more information, see Dr. 
David Gillespie. 

SCSL taking applications 

The South Carolina Student 
Legislature (SCSL) is receiving 
applications for membership for next year. 
SCSL is a bi-partisan group which 
discusses and debates political topics and 
also spends time at the South Carolina 
StateCapiiol in thefall. Intere.sted students 
should contact Leslie Chambers at 8769. 

Peer Connectors open office 

College IS a time fur exploration and 
change. It can also be a time of confusion 
and conflict of values. Sometimes, it 
helps to talk to another student about the 
problems that you face. Peer Connectors 
are trained and trustworthy students who 
arc there lo help. Peer Connectors can be 
reached in the basementof Douglas House 
(formerly the CIA room) from 8:00 pm to 
10:00 pm. Sunday through Wednesday. 
Call 8424 or drop by for a visit. 

HFH worktrips scheduled 

Habitat for Humanity sponsors 
worktrips every Saturday in Laurens. 
Contact Ron Hull (8110) if you'd like to 
help. The first campus chapter meeting 
this semester will be Wednesday. February 
3, at 7:00 pm in CrossroiKls. 

Study seminar offered 

The Office of Career Planning and 
Placement will be sponsoring a seminar 
offering tips on umc management, study 
skills, and note-taking skills. The seminar 
will be held on Sunday, February 7 at 7:00 
pm in Room 23 1 of Douglas House. For 
more information, call Extention 8379. 



Presbyterian College begins search for new registrar 



by Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 

The first semester of 1993 has 
been fairly hectic for the Registrar's 
office, due to the absence of Bill 
Gash. Gash, who was in his fourth 
year as the Assistant Academic Dean 
and Director of Student Records, 
resigned last month to take a job in 
his home state of North Carolina. 

The vacancy left by Gash has 
not been filled. According to Bill 
Moncrief, vice president for 
academic affairs, PC has begun to 
advertise the job opening in such 
publications as the Chronicle of 
Higher Education, a national 
newspaper which lists virtually 




Dr. Bill Moncrief file photo 



every job 
position 
available 
at colleges 
a ri d 
universities 
throughout 
the United 
Slates. 

Moncrief 
stated he 
would have 
liked (Or 
{) a s ti ■ s 
position lo 



have been filled by now. "It would 
be nice to have a new registrar, but 
it is extremely important to choose 
the right person with the credentials 
necessary to fulfill the position," he 
said. 

Due to PC's decision to upgrade 
the college's computer system for 
student records, applicants for 
registrar will be interviewed by 
Moncrief and a professor from the 
computer science department. The 
reviewing process for applicants 
will begin on February 1. 
Applications will continue to be 
accepted until the position is filled. 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 29, 1993 



FEATURES 



Semester of study in China offered to PC students 



by Ron Burnside 
GUEST WRITER 

Presbyterian College students will have 
the opportunity to study in China in the fall 
semester of 1 993 in a program offered by the 
South Atlantic States Association for Asian 
and African Studies. The program will be 
administered by Wake Forest University 
and will be based at Beijing Foreign 
Languages Normal College. 

A student will cam 16 hours of credit, 
I Oof which will be in Chinese language. In 
addition to the language course, the studenis 
will take two other courses, which will be 
taught in English. China in Perspective is a 
survey course taught by Chinese scholars 
and is designed to increase die student's 
understanding of various a.spects of Chinese 
culture. Problems in Contemporary Chinese 
Politics will be taught by a member of the 
faculty of Wake Forest University who will 
al.so serve as resident director of the program. 

In addition to course work, there will be 
a variety of activities and excursions in and 
around Beijing. Students will have the 
opportunity to attend theatrical 
performances, films, and ojx'ra as well as to 
visit factories, museums, neighborh(X)d 
communiiees. temples, the Great Wall, the 
Ming Tombs, and festival celebrations. 

Thecostof the program isapproximately 
S64 20 and includes orientation, r(H)m, board, 
tuilion, organized cultural excursions. 
textb(X)ks and other educational materials, 
vi.sa fees, and round-u-ipairlare. The program 
will be competitive, and students must subm II 
applications by February 8. Students should 
have a minimum GPA of 2.8, demonsu-aied 
ability in foreign language study , and serious 
interest in the study of Chinese culture. 

Students should contact Dr. Burnside at 
extention 8358 or 833-0184 for more 
information or for application forms. 

Students may also contact the following , 

students who have participated m the 'l he (ireat Wall of China is onT^ihT^i^hlTp?^ 
program: .Sa ly Brady. Michael Martin, Ted study in the IVopk-'s Repuh c ' ' 

CarmichacI, Chris Adair, Pncelimmerman, *^ 

Josh EInxl and Ja.son Whiiener. 




tnts mil visit if they eh(M»se lo 

f'hntd h\ Run HurtiMtie 



Students get first 
'bitter prejudices' 



-hand look at the 
of Middle East life 



by Martha Lvnn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Taking their education from the front 
seats of a poliucal science classroom to ihe 
front lines of the divided West Bank, PC 
students Catherine Ray and Kathyrn 
Spearman s[x;ni an eye-opening summer in 
the Middle Fast. 

While taking classes at an Inicmational 
Summer Program at Bir/eil University, Ray. 
a junior from Barnwel I, Souih Carolina, and 
Speannan.aseniorfrom Summcrville, South 
Carolina, saw first-hand the stringent 
divisions between Palestinians and Israelis. 

Since l%7 Palesunians have been u^ing 
to regain their homeland on the West Bank 
of the Jordan River from Israeli occupation. 

Ray and Spearman were observant 
witnesses lo the political suilc. "The 
prejudices were bitter, " Spearman said. "If 
there was a blank wall, it wasn't long before 
it was covered with grafitu." 

In any icmiory under Israclux cupauon, 
il IS illegal 10 have the Palestinian Hag, or to 
even display its colors together on a shirt or 
olhcrarticlc of clothing. Anyone found with 
any kindof PLOmaterial nsks imprisonmeni 
for 180 days wiihouumyone being nolilied. 

'The Uniied States has a tendency to 
sympathize with the Israelis, but 1 think 
things are siiimng to shilt," noicd Ray. 




Bir/eit Universiiy is an independent 
Palestinian insiiluuon that has been under 
military (Kcupation since 1967. According 
to some sources, the Israelis periodically 
close down the university to punish 
Palesliniansiudenidemonsu-aiors.lo hinder 
their education, and to desuoy their morale. 
It was just reopened last summer after being 
closed for four years. 

During their study, die PC students 
witnessed many demonstrations at the 
university; and in the University Campus 
Center, ihey saw pictures memorializing 
martyred Palestinian protestors. 

The students tix)k twoclas.ses: a pol lUcal 
science course enutled "The Palestinia 
Problem," and a sociology course entitled 
"Palestine UnderOccupation." Two Arabic 
language courses were alst) available. 

Dr. Tom Weaver, associate professor 
of political science at PC, did hisdisseriaiion 
research at Bir/cit Universiiy. He is now 
ncgotiaung for a possible student exchange 
program. 

"You have to understand that ihis is not 
atypical study abroad opportunity," Weaver 
said. "It's a big step for two students lo go 
to a Third World environment Adding 
military occupauon to the equation makes it 
anevengreaiorchallenge. Ihavcthcgreatesi Kathryn Spearman (left), Irish student JoAnn Murphy, and Catherine Ray take in 
admirauon tor ihcm ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ Qumran. where the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered. photo by Ray 



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Fate of new season depends on groundhog 

by Kim Rabon 

STAFF WRITER 

In a world of scientific technology, no Candlemas in England and Germany, 
one seems to place much credence in the However, the star of the show is a badger or 
ground hog's prcdicuons these days. But bear instead of a groundhog. If the skies are 
after weeks of endlessly dreary weather, he fair and bnght, winter storms will certainly 
may bt our last hope. come. But if the weather is rainy and wet. 

The tradition of groundhog day was winter weather has come and gone, 
intrixluced lo America by immigrants from The ftrsl observance of Groundhog Day 

Germany and 

Great Britain. ^ 

They believed 
that It was a 
means of 

foreca.sting the 
weather for the 
subsequent six 
weeks. 

According 
to legend, the 

groundhog awakens from its long winter 
sleep on February 2. at which lime it comes 
out of Its hole and looks around. If the sun 
IS shining and the groundhog can sec its 



V. 




look place on 
February 2, 1908. 
Each year since 
then, hundreds of 
dedicated 
groundhog 
watchers have 
gone in search of 
the groundhog's 

^ burrow in 

Quarry ville, 
Pennsylvania to watch its reacuon to the 
weather. After watching the groundtog, llw 
observers return to town and report their 
observations to the chairman of the Board of 



mSAJH 



shadow, it is frightened and g(x;s back into Hibemaung Governors, who then announces 

Its hole, signilying six more weeksof winter to the world that the groundhog has or has 

weather not seen its shadow. 

If the day is cloudy and the groundhog Different groups of groundhog bvers 

cannotsee ilsshactow, it slays out of its hole, celebrate the holiday in different ways. Some 

indicaung that spring weather will arrive start with groundhog banquets and breakfast 

s(xin. Although die tradition has grown in andend with acclebrauonof the gnxindhog's 

pt)pularity, scientific evidence has not reactKxi. So the question is, how will you 

confimied the grtxindhog tale. celebrate^ 

Groumlhog Day is also celebrated as 



FEATURES 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 29, 1993 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



POLITICS 



Rhudene Brooks: Neville Halls's best-kept secret 



by Martha Lynn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Rhudene Brooks knows Neville Hall 
like noone else knows it. As custodian of 
thatbuilding, she travels from room to room, 
preserving the dignity of the place which 
serves as home to several of the school's 
social science and humanities disciplines. 
But Brooks herself is an example of dignity 
and discipline. 

Brooks has a disease. "Reading is a 
disease, it really is," she reasoned. "It is just 
like an addiction." 

Habits are hard to break. 

She learns because she wants to. She 
has always loved to read. As a child she 
loved story hour at school. In her own 
childhood home, her grandmother was 
illiterate. Then and there Brooks vowed to 
make reading a part of her life. Now she is 
making a collection of her favorite books so 
that one day she can pass the tfadition on to 
her six-year-old grandson. "He can already 
read books by himself," she said proudly. 
"Now, I'll buy himjusta few toys, but books 
are the most important." 

Brooksisreadingtwobooksnow: Maya 
Angelou's Gather Together in My Name 
and a biography of John C. Calhoun. She 
never has to look hard for a new book. She 
spends many nights in the PC library while 
her husband George cooks for the canteen, 
and professorsare constantly throwing books 
her way. 

Brooks' self-education does not focus 
exclusively on English. She is also a student 
of psychology and religion — she often sits 
in on classes just so she can learn new things 
that she has always wanted to know about. 

"If we could somehow infuse, graft, or 



knead in o the PC student body Rhudene's 
joy of reading, commitment to writing, and 
awareness of literature's importance for 
living, I think that soon U.S. News would 
want to devote an entire issue to us," exuded 
English professor Dr. James Skinner. 

"I think that English is very hard," she 
said. Brooks graduated from segregated 
Bell Street High School in Clinton where, in 
1960, the books they used were very out of 
date. When she found reading difficult or 
felt like she was speaking incorrectly, she 
was concerned. 

"But Dr. Skinner explained it all to me 
when he told me that standard English was 
not my language." she said. Brooks now 
realizes just how different Black English is 
from other spoken and written English 
dialects. Now she has taught herself to go 
back and forth with ease between the two 
dialects and bcwecn her two favorite authors , 
Zora Neale Hurston {Their Eyes Were 
Watching God) and Charles Dickens. 

This semester Brooks is taking the 
African American Religious Experience 
class under Dr. Peter Hobbie. "I wanted to 
learn more about Africa," she says. In a 
poem that she wrote last month, "Six o'ClcKk 
Train" she makes use of African names, 
another topic that interests her. 

The 6 a.m. Train 

Nalori's scarred hands gripped 

the chipped coffee cup. 

Her bright eyes were transfixed 

on the damp outline his body had left 

on the bed. 






y 



ii 



^ 



Five years have passed. 
The morning he said good-bye 
was the beginning of cool breezes 
and .sad melodies. 

Envision a remote ice-covered road 
where nia.ssive oaks 
loom on each .side. 

The staccato .sound of her footsteps are 
heard long before a dark silhouette 
is seen in the pale moonlight. 

Nalori's .sensual body moves 

as if by rhythnuc compulsion 

Her voice cuts through the cold night air 

singing the work.songs her Malawi 



phtilo by I odd Love 

grundnunhcr taught her 

They brought comfort and chased 

the night shadows away. 

She could hear the am train whi.stle 

blowing in the distance. 

The .sound no longer tormented her. 

Words can lake Brcwks to places that 
she has never kvn, Dickens can show her 
iho soul ul hufnanily, and Hurston and 
other Black wntcrs can connect her with 
her history. But fortunately lor us. learning 
IS a two way slroct, and Br(.K)kscan inspire 
us to use our minds to make the most out 

of our lives. 



Little Known Facts 



Winter Conference addresses relationships 




Student Activities Director Randy Randall coached the first PC women's basketball 

team in 1977. Randy was also a star basketball player during his own illustrious college 

career. 

A iM"ofessor named Mr. Shakespeare used to [C'e£\\ in K'h English IX-jiarunent. 



by Cynthia See liger 
STAFF^' WRITER 

Last weekend students and faculty 
gathered at Camp BethclwcKHls near Rwk 
Hill. SC, for l*C's unique WintcrConlerence. 

The conference, founded in 1970 to 
establish peace among leuding religious 
groups, provides the K' community with a 
chance each year to hear a distinguished 
Christian scholar and wrestle with new or 
challenging ideas. 

This year Dr. Bill Amold, professor of 
pasU)ral counseling at Union Theological 
Seminary in Richmond. Virginia spoke on 
"Relationship Issues in an Alicruitcd Worid " 

"We as human k-ings are linitc, gillcd, 
sinful, relational , developmental, and 
redeemed, " chanted Dr. Amold lliroughout 
the weekend. He encouraged smaller groups 
to consider individually how each ix*rson's 
characteristics help or hinder personal 
relationships. The idea was that one's 
relations will improve after one has 
acknowledged one's personal limitations, 
gifts, sins, changing charattcristics, and 
redeemed qualities 

Dr. Arnold grazed the topic of 
psychological gender dillerences, which 
often cause misunderstandings between 
couples, He emphasized that in order to 



have a gotxl relationship, both parties 
must realize that each is to be a u-easure, 
each IS innately always dilfercnt 
(conlormity ought not be forced), and that 
both have the ability and duty to 
communicate. 

ITie rest ot the coiiterence was full of 
the usualanucs Dr. Bumside.Dr. Hunter, 
Dr Ramsey, and Mr. Stallworthperfbmicd 
their annual quartet hannonies with such 
lav()ritesas"SwingU)w"and"G(XKlnighi 
Irene." 

Every male was forbidden to 
wallllower during the square dance, so 
that even Dean Moncnef was jiving to 
"Elvira." 

Alter plentiful dosy-does, many 
braved the cold night ti) take part in a 
tractor pulled hayride. "In spite of the 
lone deal renditions of camp song, the 
stars shone hnt'hlly," eoiiiiiu-iiu-d one 
indiilger 

llie ice cream orgy on Saturday night 
spieed up the tune preceding John Paul 
Wallers' concert, which consisted ol his 
own county and folk songs. 

In retros|X'ct, students attending the 
conlerenee noted their pleasure in talking 
to laculiy niemhers without sensing 
academic stigmas 



Clinton Cabinet selections easily approved by Senate 



By Ted Carmichael 
POLITICS EDITOR 

By Christmas Day, President Bill 
Clinton had announced the members of his 
new Cabinet, meeting his self-imposed 
deadline. All of the appointees except for 
Zoe Baird (sec related story) were approved 
by the Senate within two days of his 
inauguration. 

The following is a short biography of 
the new secretaries of state, defense, 
uxiasury, education, and labor. 

Secretary of the Treasury 

Lloyd Bentson has been named as the 
treasury .secretary. He is a former senator 
from Texas and was the chairman of the 
senate finance committee. He was also the 
DemcKratic nominee for vice-president m 
1 988, running with Michael Dukakis. 

Bentson, 71, has been described as a 
"business-friendly millionaire" who has 
very su^ong contacts with the business 
community as well as the Senate. He, along 
with some other of Clinton's lop people, 
was chosen not as much for his ideas on the 
economy as for his ability to get Clinton's 
economic plan through the Congress. 

Secretary of State 

Warren Christopher, 67. is the new 
secretary of state. He has been the head of 
Clinton's transition team and was 
insu^umental in selating Senator Al Gore 
as the vice -presidential nominee. He hiKl 
previously scrvedas Jimmy Carter's dc[)uty 
secretary of state and also as the deputy 
attorney general under Lyndon Johnson. 

Christopher believes that the day-to-day 
conduct of foreign policy belongs to the 
president and the Stale Deparunent, not the 
Congress. He is an experienced diplomat 
and is known as a patient and persistent 
negotiator. 

Secretary of Df ff nse 

The IX'lensc Secretary is Les A.spin, .*>4, 
a lormer House Armed Services Chairman 
who also has expcnence working in the 




Warren Christopher 



Dick Riley 



photos by Newsweek and Congressional Quarterly Review 




Les Aspin 

Pentagon. His knowledge of the military is 
said u> be extensive, and while in the Hou.se 
he was often instrumental m steering the 
debate on military matters. 

Aspm plans to work to make the military 
"smaller, smarter, and faster" in the future. 
But according to some of the top people in the 
FVntagon, including Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Gen. Colin Powell, the cuts he wants would 
go tixi far. A.spin will also quickly have to 
get a handle on the situations in the Middle 
East. Somalia. Bosnia, and the former Soviet 



Llovd Bentson 



Union. 

Secretary uf Edutatiun 

Former govemor of South Carolina Dick 
Riley, 60, has been named as Secretary of 
Education. He, like Clinton, is considered 
to be in the forefront of educational reform 
and has received much recognition for his 
work in improving SC schools. A one-cent 
increase in the state sales tax paid for 
initiatives to raise academic standards. 



increase the amount of teacher training, and 
improve testing. He also gave more funding 
to state colleges and worked to improve 
working conditions in the school systems. 
Although the federal government has 
limited power over the state school systems, 
Clinton has outlined what he expects from 
the Education Department, including setting 
national standards and helping to pull 
together resources in order to design schools 
that will "meet tomorrow's needs." Given 
Clinton's emphasis on education and the 
governor's record in SC, Riley will 
undoubtedly be instrumental in the 
president's major education reform 
initiatives over the next four years. 

Secretary of Labor 

Clinton's new Labor Secretary is the 
pol itical econom ist Robert Reich. The 4 ' 1 0" 
arihorand lecturer from Harvard's Kennedy 
School of Government has known the 
president since tJieir days at Oxford. His 
discussions with Clintcxi on the economy 
have been going off and on for over 20 years. 
The economic solutions on which Clinton 
ran his campaign were largely based on 
Reich's latest novel The Work of Nations. 
One of the main tenets of this book is that the 
new global economy requires a different 
role for the federal government. He maintains 
that it essentially does not matter whether a 
company is based in Tokyo or LA, since an 
Oldsmobile may have less "domestic 
content" than a Honda built in Ohio. 
Therefore, says Reich, the government 
should not aid particular industries or give 
tax breaks to investors. Instead, we should 
invest in the two assets that will not leave 
the country: "human capital" with educaticm 
and pb training and infrastructure, such as 
re)ads, bridges, high-speed railways.and fiber 
optic communications networks. These 
types of investments, he concludes, would 
encourage both US and foreign companies 
to create jobs in America. 



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Baird nomination withdrawn 



bv Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS LDITOR 

When Zoe Baird was selected for the 
position of attomey general, it was hailed as 
a landmark decision. Baird was considered 
exceptionally qualified and would have been 
the first woman to hold that office. But 
instead, she turned out to be the only snag in 
Clinton's otherwise unanimously approved 
cabinet. 

Baird withdrew her name from 
consideration Saturday after coming under 
increasingly harsh cnticism from members 
of Congress and their ccmstitucnts The 
conuoversy came about because Baird had 
htfed two illegal aliens - a husband and wife 
to work in her household. The couple had 



worked for her about two years, starung in 
J ul y of 1 990. but did not have proper working 
papers Baird had also failed to pay any 
s(x:ial secunty taxes for them 

When she was U)ld about the position of 
attorney general, she informed Ginton's 
team about the two workers and also paid 
about SLS.CXK) m fines, back taxes, and 
penalties. Nevertheless, members of the 
Senate's Judiciary Committee felt that the 
incident called into question her credibility 
for highest US law enforcement job. 

Baird will return to her former $507,000- 
a-year job as an attomey at the Aetna Life 
and Casualty Co. , from which she had taken 
a leave of absence after her nomination 



POLITICS 



8 



FRIDAY JANUARY 29. 1993 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



ENVIRONMENT 



Possible SC gubernatorial candidate visits PC's College Republicans 





« ■■. j aiWi L i iBiii i itwi'l. iii KWf ii WftW i iu w rJBww ji w 




r« 




David Wilkins, a member of the SC (ieneral Assembl;^, speaks to a group of College 
Republicans. Wilkins Is considering a run for governor in '94. photo by Kim Gibson 



bv Jason West 

EblTOR-lN-CHIEF 

According lo the S[Kakor Pro Tempore 
of ihc Slate House of RcprcsenLatives,Souih 
Carolina is rapidly becoming a Republican- 
dominated stale. Representative David 
Wilkins (R) of Greenville made this 
siaiemcnt last week when he visited ihe K" 
chapter of the College Republicans. 

"Based on the 1992 elections, it is cle^ir 
that South Carolina is a Republican 
su-onghold. This slate was one of 18 that 
went for George Bush in the last presidential 
election and had the second highest 
percentage of support for Bush of all those 
18 states." said Wilkins. 

Wilkins also credits Republican gains 
in iheGcneral Assembly loSouthCarolina's 
lilt to the right. "This past cletlion, the 
Republican Party picked up 7 seats in the 
House of Representatives, bringing our total 
to 50 members, or 40 percent," said W ilkins. 

"In addition, the party picked up three 
scats in the Senate, creating the highest 
number of Republican senators in South 
Carolina since Reconsu-uction." he added. 

"When I came lo the House of 
Representatives in 1 98 1 , there were only 1 9 
Republican members. Wc have come a long 
way, and 1 believe that in four years wc will 
be able to take over the South Carolina 
House and elect a Republican Speaker," 
added Wilkins. 

Wilkins reminded ihe group that it is 
imperative thai the Republican Party hold 
on lo the Governor's Mansion in 1994 
Carroll Campbell has served as tfie state's 
Republican governor since 1986 and will 
stepaside inlwo years. Wilkins isconsidcred 
a possible contender for Campbell's 
replacement. 



Wilkins is a graduate of Clemson 
University and of the University of South 
Carolina Law School. He is a practicing 
lawyer in Greenville. Wilkins was firsl 
elected to the House of Rcpresenialives in 
1981 and has served as the chairman of ihc 
House Judiciary Committee, luirlier this 
month, Wilkins became the first Republican 
in the 20lh Century to Iv elected Spe;iker 
Pro Tempore in Soutli Carolina. 

Other Republicans considering a run 
for the Governor's Mansion include 
Congres.sman Arthur Ravenel. Secretary of 
StaieJim Miles, State SenaU)rJ()hnCourson, 
and former Congressman Tommy lUu'tnetl. 

Some DenuKraUc challengers who plan 
to run for governor include Attorney General 
Travis Medlock. Lt. Governor Nick 
Theodore, Charleston Mayor Jiv Riley, and 
former Congresswoman Li/ Patterson. 

Wilkins reported lo the College 
Republicans thai govemmeni reform will be 
the major item of discussion in the General 
Assembly this year. He stated that there will 
be proposals to create a cabinet system of 
government for South Carolina, to improve 
the efficiency of existing stale agencies, and 
to limit terms for state oflicials. In addition, 
Wilkins believes that sch(X)l choice, the 
creation of a state lottery, the regulation or 
outlawing of video poker machines, and the 
Confederate Flag's Hying over the Sl;iie 
Capitol Will be issues ihai will generate 
discu.ssion among members of the General 
Assembly. 

Wilkins stilted that he has not definitely 
made up his mind about whether he will run 
for governor. "I hope to make a decision 
witlun tlie ne.xt M) days It is time to do 
something," he said. 



Clinton administration faces a wide variety of challenges 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

William Jefferson Clinton look office as 
the President of the United Stales last 
Wednesday, January 20th. He is saond 
only lo John Kennedy as the youngest 
American to be elected to thai position. 

Clinton's administration will face many 
tough challenges in ihe next few years, not 
least of which are the gapping fi.scal deficii 
and the health care crisis. Exactly what he 
will do lo correct these problems and still 
"grow the economy" is a question on many 
people's minds. Also, as Clinton settles 
into the While House, a number of his 
campaign promises are evolving inlo"goals" 
or being scrapped allogether. For example, 
the pmjecicd deficil for fiscal 1993 has 
increased subslanlially, which makes it 
nearly impossible lo reduce ihe deficit by 
half in four years and still have money to 
invest in the infrastructure or make health 
care available to everyone. 

Nevertheless, Clinton is acting quickly. 
With the exception of the position of 
Attorney General, allofhiscabmelpositions 



have been filled. The Secretary of Stale, 
Secretary of Defense, and Secretary of ihe 
Treasury were approved less lhan45 minutes 
after Clinton look office, as one member put 
il,"loensureancffalivechainof command" 
due to ihe pressing international situation in 
Iraq. The other nominees-including the two 
positions that Clmttin plans to raise locabinel 
siaius. the ambassador to ihe UN and the 
director of the Environmental Protection 
Agency-were approver! the following day. 

Clinton has alreiidy issued an executive 
order lifting abortion resirictions that were 
imposed by Reagan and Bush. These 
overturned policies include the "gag rule," 
which prevented federally funded family 
planning clinics from discussing abortion as 
an opuon, and the 5 -year ban on fetal Ussue 
research, which could possibly benefit people 
with Parkinson's di.seasc, Al/heimer's 
disea.se, diabetes, spinal cord injuries, and 
other ailments. Clinton also plans to revt)ke 
prohibitions of RU 486, a French "aboruon 
pill," if it meets USFDA standards. 

Clinton is also expected lo sign a bill now 
working its way through ihe House which 



would strengthen Roe vs. Wade by giving 
women the right to abortion by federal law . 
Bulfirstontlie agenda will be a bill that will 
give pregnant women an unpaid leave of 
absence from businesses thai have more 
than 50 employees. A simihu- bill was 
vet(X.'d by Bush last year. 

Clinton will probably lift the ban on gays 
in the military next week, against the wishes 
of most membersof the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
who argue that such a move would 
demoralize the troops. Also high on his list 
arc his plans for ConsTi^ssKinal finance and 
lobbying reform > 

Clinton is al.so expected lo define what 
role Hillary will play in the new 
administration. She is selling up an office in 
the we.si wing of the White House, and, 
acct)rding lo a recent Wall Street Journal 
article, will probably serve as the head of the 
group that will drafi the plan for health care 
reform. 

When asked about his wife's role, 
Clinton replied that he would be "derelict in 
mv duly if I didn't . . . Like advantage of the 
most talented fK'ople lean find. Sheceriamly 



qualifies there." He also said that he plans to 
use her in some "major" way, but "within 
the confines of what is pro|K'r." 

Backing off from his pledge to submit a 
plan for the economy "the tlay after the 
inaugurauon," Clinion has said that his plan 
should be ready by mid February. He and 
his newly-created National Economic 
Council will be trying to decide w hat ly|V of 
shon-ierm stimulus is required in halance 
with a long-term investment plan. Any such 
plan will probably he lied together with 
spending cuts in other areas and with tax 
increases, including a possible levy on 
gasoline and a national sales tax. 

On the back burner for now, but sull a 
high priority, are his plans fi)r major 
education imiiativesand tora naiional service 
plan comparable to the Peace Corps, And, 
ofcourse, there's sull the international scene, 
with jK<ace talks in the Middle luist, |H)ssible 
aid to Russia, the NAFTA Ueaty and GAIT 
talks, and the US commitmenLs in Somalia. 
All told. It l{X)ks lo be a busy term for our 
42nd president. 



BOOK REVIEW Earth in the Balance 



by Katherine Spearman 

STAF-P WRITER 



Vice President Al Gore's book 
Earth in the Balance is a book for anybtxly 
even remotely interested in the future of our 
world. It IS written not merely from the 
environmenial standpoint but also from a 
business, technological, s(x;ial, and poliucal 
standpoint. The b(X)k begins with an alarm- 
ing account of Gore's trip to the Aral Sea in 
the former Soviet Union. Once the founh 
largest inland sea in the world, it has been 
reduced to a fraction of its original size due 
to overuse in imgalion. The overuse has 
literally left strips stranded in a desert. 

The book goes on U) explore the 
environmental cnses beyond the point of 
giving dry facts. In the excellent chapter 
Climate and Civilization: A short history, 
Gore gives an iniercsiing and very plausible 



theory that many of history's mapr events 
suchas the French Revolution and the Bl^k 
Death were caused in large part by environ- 
mental crises. 

He goes on to explore why we treat 
the planet the way we do. In the stunning 
chapter Environmenialism of the Spirit he 
explores the background of our current 
relationship with the planet. He discusses 
how philosophers such as Plaio and Aristotle 
and ihe church have shaped this view. 

In a break from most other 
environmental books, Gore provicks what 
he calls a Global Marshall Plan. This is a 
plan for ending our rapid desuiicuon of the 
environment In it he addresses such topics 
as technology and its role m saving the 
environment, the economic side, and the 
role of all counties, especially the United 
Stales, in this plan. 

Perhaps the most important goal of 
this book is ihe message that the change 
must begin with you and me. AH of the 



policies in the world can not make a differ- 
ence unless we open our eyes and see that 
the destruction is real, and approaching rap- 
idly is the critical point when nothing we do 
will slop our destruction. As Gore says at 
the close of the book, "For civilization as a 
whole, the faith that is so essential lo restore 
the balance now missing in our relationship 
10 the earth is the faith thai we do have a 
future. We can believe in that future and 
work to achieve it and preserve it or we can 
whirl blindly on, behaving as if one day 
there will be nochildren to inherit our legacy. 
The choice is ours, the earth is in the bal- 
ance." 

This book is a must-read for any- 
one interested in our planet which shcxild 
include everyone. It is a fascinaung and 
fresh look al this Iife-ihreaienmg problem. 
The facts about whai we have done and are 
doing to the environment will scare you. 
Hopefully, it will make you ask, "Why is 
this happening, and what can I do?" 



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that 1 993 will be even more 
successful. The items that 
can be recycled remain the 
same: aluminum, glass, 
plastics, cardboard, and 
newspaper. Questions 
should be directed to 
Heather Moncrief, box 
974. 



Recycle today for a better 
tomorrow! 



EPA report may lead to stricter smoking restrictions for many 



by Heahier Moncnef 
ENVIRONMENT EDITOR 



The Environmental Protection 
Agency has concluded that secondhand 
smoke IS a cancer-causmg agent that will 
kill approximately 3.(XK) nonsmokers each 
year The report issued this month also 
esumaies that secondhand smoke cau.ses 
hundreds of iht)usands of children to suffer 
from pneumonia, 
bronchitis, middle- 
ear infections, ;uid 
asthma attacks. 
While there are both 
critics and advo- 
cates of the report, 
all K'lieve that it 
could lead to su-icler 
laws defining 
where, when, and 
around whom one 
can smoke 

It is 

speculated that 
OSHA (the Occu- 
pational Safely and 
HoallhAdmimstra- 
iion) will ban 
smoking in the 
workplace Other 

organizations such as the American liearl 
As,s(Kiation, the American Lung A.s,stKia- 
lion. and the American Cancer StKiety have 
urged Conga'ss to increase the federal exc isc 
lax on cigarettes from 27 cents U) $2 a pack. 

Al present restrictions on smok 
mg in Ihe US are low. Smoking is not 




banned in ihree-fifihs of schooh or iwo- 
ihirds of businesses, and five states have no 
restrictions on smoking. Theseinstilulions 
may be forced to impose restrictions in the 
near future. 

Critics of the report are pointing to 
weaknesses which the EPA may have to 
defend. The Tobacco Institute has ques- 
tioned the lack of acknowledgment given to 
a 1 W2 study of the Nauonal Ciincer Institute 
which concluded that there was no statisti- 
cally significant in- 
crease in cancer 
among nonsmok- 
ers. However, the 
authorof that report, 
Dr.RossBrownson, 
commented that he 
did report a signifi- 
cant increase of 
cancer in women 
exposed to high 
levels of second- 
hand smoke. 

The debate is far 
from over Yel.itis 
predicted that the 55 
million Americans 
who smoke will feci 
the results of this 
rc[X)rt, both at work 
and at play 
Several Piesbyi'^rian College stu- 
dents were asked to respond to the follow mg 
question: "Aftei k'coming aware of the 
EPA reptirt released this month, do you feel 
that there is a need for suicter regulations.' 
Would you support such restricuons on the 
PC campus?" Their responses vary. 



'The fear of cancer is not in the forefront of 
my agreement with this proposal; however, 
in confined areas (i.e. anywhere indoors) 
secondhand smoke can tend to be very 
bothersome to nonsmokers and smokers 
alike. I don't care how long someone has 
been a smoker; there are going to be limes 
when he/she docs noi want to smell it. If 
there are to be no new restricuons, I would 
hope that people who do cha)se to smoke 
would not infringe on the rights of non- 
smokers by choice." 
Brad Sims 
PC Senior 

"I think smok- 
ing restrictions on 
campus are already 
strong enough. You 
really can't smoke 
anywhere on cam- 
pus now; there arc 
not many places to 
take away. Su-icter 
policies in some 
domis have already 
resulted from com- 
plaints by students. 
However if they ik) 
innx>se stricter re- 
suicuons, I would 
feel obligated to 

follow them because it would be a violauon 
of the Cixle of Conduct if 1 did not." 
Lauren Heard 
PC S(^)homore 

"I would be in favor of banning smok- 
ing in all public buildings- including build- 



ings on campus. Not only are there long- 
term health risks linked with second 
handsmoke, but there are also immediate 
affects of secondhand smoke we need to 
Pec^le with respiratory disorders, such as 
asthma, and contact lens wearers are only a 
few of the people who are adversely affected 
by secondhand smoke." 
Kelly Jernigan 
PC Junior 

"1 think that m public pl»;es, smoke 
will somehow 
reach us all. There- 
fore, out of just 
common courtesy 
smokers should asit 
those around them 
if their smoke 
would bother 
them." 

Stephanie Dowdy 
PC Junior 

I believe that a 
person should be 
sensitive to others 
by not smoking if it 
IS offensive. How- 
ever, that should be 
their decision to 
make, Strict regu- 
lations would infringe on an individual's 
personal freedom. As far as not being al- 
lowed to smoke in the workplace, that is the 
dec ision to be made by each business as they 
see fit." 

Ted Carmichael 
PC Senior 




SPORTS 



10 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



Men's Blue Hose basketball ranked 15th in national poll 



by Everett Catts 
SPORTS EDITOR 

With a 15-2 overall record (6-1 SAC), 
the 1992-93 Blue Hose Basketball Team has 
been recognized as one of the best squads in 
the nation. As of January 18, the PC team 
was ranked 15th in the NAI A poll, climbing 
six spaces from January 1 1 's ranking. The 
Blue Hose are also ranked highly in the 
South Atlantic Conference. With a 6-1 
record, PC is first in the conference, living 
up to their pre-season #1 ranking by the 
SAC coaches. 

While many PC students were relaxing 
over the Christmas break, the Blue Hose 
were facing conference opponents. On Jan. 
6 the team edged Catawba, 73-70. PC was 
led by Jdm Lloyd's 22 points. Bret Jones, 
Bryan Franklin, and Derrick Lovelace 
followed with 14, 11, and 10 points, 
respectively. Lovelace added a team high 6 
rebounds. Three days later, the Blue Hose 
crushed Elon, 68-52. Lloyd led the team 
with 20 points and 8 rebounds, and Jones 
added 1 1 points and hauled in 7 rebounds. 
Andrew Wellman had 14 points and Franklin 
chalked up 8. 

The squad next faced Wingate, ranked 
second in the SAC at that time, on January 
13. PC, led by Wellman's 22 points, 
demolished Wingate, winning 99-56 and 
playing all 1 5 players. The Blue Hose broke 
a school record by connecting on twelve 
three-pointers in the game, six of which 
were contributed by Wellman. Lloyd 
contributed 16 points, and Stephen West 
had 11. Guards West and Ernest Holiday 
hauled in S rebounds, while Bret Jones led 
the team effort with 8 rebounds. 

For his conuibutions to that week's 
games, 6-10 center John Lloyd was named 
the SAC Player of the Week. Lloyd, a junior 
from Hilton Head Island, transferred from 
B YU last year and has been a starter in most 
games since. 

Three days after the Wingate game, the 
Blue Hose drubbed Carson-Newman, 72- 
57. Jones led the team with 2 1 points and 7 
rebounds. Lloyd added 15. On January 20 
PC hosted Mars Hill, another team which 
had been second in the conference until 
playing the home team. In front of 1800 
screaming fans, the Blue Hose won, 76-71, 
despite leading by only one point with 1:07 




PC's Derrick Lovelace (44) goes up for a 

left in the game. PC shot 58.5% from the 
field and 83% from the frec-throw-line. 

Bret Jones led the Blue Hose team with 
27 points and 8 rebounds. Wellman added 
1 5, and Franklin, Lloyd, and Lovelace each 
had 8. Fan support played a crucial role in 
determining the outcome of the game. In 
both the Wingate and Mars Hill games, the 
fans were terrific, giving the players, as Co- 
Captain Stephen West said, "...more 
momentum and an exu-a boost." Co-Captain 
Bret Jones added, "The fans have been great. 
They're a sixth man for us, and it's a great 
aunosphere." 

After crowds of 1500 and 1800 at the 
Wingateand Mars Hill home victories, 1 7(X) 



basket in a recent game with Mars Hill. 

photo by Kim Gibson 
PC take on Lenoir-Rhyne, the third straight 
team ranked second in the SAC to visit the 
Blue Hose squad. PC slane<l quickly, leading 
10-2 ju.st 4:45 into the game. The Bears of 
L-R narrowed the gap, but the Blue Hose 
pulled out to a 1 5-point lead with 6; 1 3 left in 
the half. At halftime PC was up by .seven, 
32-25. 

In the saond half, the Bears came back 
and eventually tied the score at 40 iX)inLs 
apiece with 12:59 left. From thenon.Lxnoir- 
Rhync was ahead until Tony Grant's three- 
point play tied the score, 61-61, with 1:29 
remaining. After getting the ball back on a 
Lenoir-Rhync turnover, the Blue Hose had 
40 seconds to score for the win. 



Name: Will Lind.sU-om 
Sport: Men's Soccer 
Position: Midfielder 
Class: Senior 
Major: Psychology 
Minor: English 

Award!!: four-time All-SAC; three- 
time All-SAC Tournament Team; 
three-time All-District; 1992 NAIA 
first team Ail-American; two-time 
All-South; 1992 NAIA All- 
America Scholar Athlete; two-time 
NAIA Academic All-District; two- 
time SAC Academic Honor Roll; 
1992 SAC Player of the Year; 1992 
SAC Tournament MVP; 1993 
Umbro Senior Bowl. 



In The Spotlisht 




Unfortunately, Bret Jones' shot missed, 
and the game went to overtime. 

During almost all of the fivc-minulc 
overtime pcrial, the Bears had the lead, 
with PC lying the score at 65 and 69 points 
each. With the score lied, 69-69, the Bears' 
Tyrone McDanicl missed a three-pointer 
With only seven ticks remaining on ihc 
clock, the Blue Hose dribbled the ball past 
half court and called a time out. Only two 
seconds were left for ihc Blue Hose to win 
the game. John Lloyd pas.scd ihc ball to an 
airbom Bret Jones, who incd a short bank 
shot but missed, sending the game to a 
second overtime. The score sKxxl at 69-69. 
PC lied the score four times in the 
second overtime. With the Blue Hose down 
by three, 80-77, Andrew Wellman hit a 
three-pointer 10 tie the score. Unfortunately, 
the Bears followed with six unanswered 
pt)inls, partially due tolwocrucial offensive 
fouls by the Blue Hose. The game ended 
with the .score 86-80. 

When asked about the team's overall 
play and goal fulfilling. Coach Nibcrt .said, 
"We've been really pleased. Alter the loss 
to Belmont Abbey (m December], they've 
worked hard. Tony Grant and freshman 
Bryan Frank 1 in ha vc done a great job off the 
bench. Stephen West is sh(xning the ball 
well, and Jay Whitney and freshman 
Jonathan Bankhead have done well 
defensively and offensively." 

BretJones added, "The loss to L-R hurt, 
but we're still number one in the SAC. We 
hope to fini.sh 1 3- 1 or 14-2 in the conference." 
When discussing K"s five freshman 
players, Brcl Jones said, "Franklin is playing 
very well for a freshman, and JonaUian 
Bankhead has been surprisingly gcxxl. He's 
a gcxxl 3-point shooter. All of them have 
been great." 

West added, "They're giving us a lift 
off the bench, giving us crucial baskets and 
momentum." 

Coach Nibert also commented on the 
team's national ranking, which remained at 
15lh in the NAIA poll this week. He said, 
"It's a real compliment to our players and 
coaches to be raogni/.cd. We should use 
and will use it as a motivating fac tor, but we 
try not to think about it." 

The Blue Hose defeated Wolford on 
January 25, 82-70, and travel to Gardner- 
Webb tomorrow. 



Name: Lisa Kimbrell 
Sport: Women's Volleyball 
Position: Middle Hitter 
('lavs: Senior 
Major: Math lulucalion 

Awards: 198^, 1991 second team All- 
SAC; 1992 first team All-SAC; 1992 All- 
District; twoiime Wolford Invitational 
Tourniuiient MVP; IWj second team 
Alabama-lluntsville rournank'nt; two- 
time SAC Tournament Team 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



11 



SPORTS 



Women's basketball team led by the 1 - 2 punch of Hilliard and Johnson 



by Kverett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

Ixd by the one-two punch of Jennifer 
Milliard and Melanie Johnson, the Lady 
Blue Hose Women's Basketball Team is 1 1 - 
5 (4-4 SAC). Both Hilliard, a 5-9 Junior 
forward from Columbia, and Johnson, a 5-9 
Sophomore forward/guard from Snellville, 
GA, are averaging over 16 points per game 
and are among the SAC leaders in scoring. 
Both players are also leading PC in 
rebounding, with over 6 per game for each. 
Nt)t to be overlooked are Kaye Watts and 
Dionne Williams. At the guard position, 
Walts is averaging 1 1 points per game and is 
always an outside threat, making 28% of her 
three-pointers. Williams is a 5-9 forward 
who averages 6 points and rebounds per 
game. 

Like PC's men's team, the Lady Blue 
Hose have been playing since the first week 
of January. On January 4 the women's 
squad uavelled to Lenoir-Rhyne. Led by 
Hilliard's 24 points and 8 rebcxmds, PC 
crushed ihe Bears, 84-66. Two days later, 
the Lady Blue Hose visited Catawba. PC 
edged the Indians, 59-58, again led by 
Jennifer Hilliard, who chalked up 20 points 
and hauled in an incredible 14 rebounds. It 
was Hilliard's third double-double of the 
sea.st>n. 

In their third straight conference road 
game, PC took on Elon, losing by one point, 
62-61. Johnson and Walts lead the Lady 
Blue Hose with 14 points apiece. Williams 
hauled in 1 1 rebounds to lead K'sauack on 
the boards. Two days later, the Lady Blue 
Hose hosted Erskinc for their first home 
game of 1993. K" obliterated the Flying 
Meet, 81-55. Johnson led the Lady Blue 



Hose with 25 points. Williams and Hilliard 
each had 8 rebounds. 

With a win on January 13 against 
Wingate (then 6-0 in SAC), the Lady Blue 
Hose had a chance to move up in the SAC 
standings and knock off the #1 team in the 
conference. Despite getting 16 points from 
Melanie Johnson and 6 rebounds from 
Dionne Williams, PC lost by four, 76-72. 
Three days later, in a loss to SAC foe Carson- 
Newman, Jennifer Hilliard .scored 1 2 points 
and added 8 rebounds. 

Trying to snap their two-game slump, 
the Lady Blue Hose faced Mars Hill in a key 
home game. Wiih a win, the team could 
improve their SAC record to 34. PC did just 
that crushing ihe Lady Lions by 16 points, 
72-56. Hilliard and Johnson once again 
shined. Hilliard's 22 points led all scorers, 
and Johnson hauled in 7 rebounds. Wil- 
liams also had 7 boards. 

The Lady Blue Hose next faced SAC 
rival Lenou--Rhyne on January 23. The 
Lady Bears suffered a crushing defeat at the 
hands of PC, 80-63. The victory evened the 
Lady Blue Ho.se's conference record at 4-4 
and improved their overall record to 11-5. 
PC is now fourth in the conference. Lenoir- 
Rhyne fell to 0-8 in the SAC. Johnson led 
PC with 19 points and 6 rebounds. Williams 
followed with 10 points and 8 rebounds, and 
Hilliard had 8 rebounds and 7 boards. Even 
more unportant was Chns Mitchum's 13 
points. Mitchum, a 5-7 freshman guard, was 
ihree-for-eight at ihe three-point line and has 
hit 36% of her three-poiniers to lead the 
team. 

The Lenoir-Rhyne game was only one 
example of the dominant play by Johnson 





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Jennifer Hilliard (left) prepares to pass 

and Hilliard. Johnson had 40 points and 13 
rebounds combined in the games against 
Mars Hill and Lenoir-Rhyne. In all 16 
games, one or the other has led PC in scoring. 
Also, in 14 of the squad's 16 games, one of 
the two players has led the team in rebounds. 
Besides leading the Lady Blue Hose in 
sconng and rebounding, both players are 
among the team leadersin steals, as.sisis,and 
freethrow percentage. Head Coach Beth 
Couture commented on the players, saying, 
"I'm really pleased with Melanie and 
Jennifer, but they have to play well for us to 
go far in the playoffs." 

When asked about the team's playing. 
Couture said, "Being 10-5 (now 11-5) is 
good. We've had a lot of high points and a 
couple of lows, but I'm confident where we 
arc." 

Co-Captain Ashley Jenkins added, "I 
think we've done well to be so young, and 
when we can play really well, we're very 



the bail against a Mars Hili defender. 

hard to beat." photo by Kim Gibson 

Lavetle Douglas, the other Co-(2aptain, 
added, "If we focus on what we need to, we 
can do better. I don't think our team realizes 
how good we are." 

Coach Couture also commented on the 
three freshmen — Chris Mitchum, Krisiy 
Taraik). and Jennifer Mims. Couture said, 
"(Thris is a good offensive threat, Kristy is 
good on defense, and Jotntfer Mims has 
staned and played well.." 

Comnjenting of fan support. Couture 
said, "The checrleadCTs have been great in 
leading the crowd." 

Jenkins added, "I love it The last game 
(against Lenoir-Rhyne) was great with ZTA 
and the band." 

Douglas also said, "I think our fans ve 
great Though we sull don't get as much 
recognition." 

The Lady Blue Hose's next home game 
is against Lander, at 6:00 on February 1. 



Intercristo is always 
looking for job 
leads... 




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You're ctmsidering ("hnsiian 
service, are open to reltKaling, 
but ditn'i know where to begin? 
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you where, (all todiiy, loll free; 

1-8(M)-426'1342 




photos by Todd Love 




Oi i clutn Ilk' aiui»»ii K-low 
■^ l'>WUreim>nl Ave N | 



Stall 



/.p 







Intramural Basketball Standings 






A League (Men) 


R 


L 


B League (Men) 


ii 


L 


C League (Men) 


YL 


L 


Sigma Nu 


2 





New Guns 







Bailey 








BBB 


2 





Rising Phoenix I 







RP Crickets 








CMS 


2 





Pi Kappa Alpha 








Sigma Nu II 








Public Enemy 


1 





Kappa Alpha 







Penthouse Players 








Pi Kappa Alpha 


1 


1 


Chicos Malos 







C League (Div. U) 






Theta Chi I 





1 


B League (Div. U) 






Pi Kappa Alpha 


1 





Pi Kappa Phi 





1 


DGS 







Sigma Nu 


1 





Fab 5 





1 


Org. Come 







Balsax 





1 


Theta Chi I! 





2 


Rising Phoenix II 







Unwanted 





1 


Supreme Court 





2 


Trojans 







C League (Div. Ill) 






Women's League 


(Div. I) 




B League (Div. Ill) 






PC Staff 


1 





icnuus 


1 





Bailey 







Judy Fly 


1 





U Lose 


1 





Run-N-Shoot 







Rising Phoenix 





1 


Barron Dorm 


1 





Theta Chi 








Spinnci^ 





1 


ADPi 





1 


Sigma Nu 













Theta Chi Girls 





1 


Cooler's Crew 

















tmmi*---^ 



ENTERTAINMENT 



12 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1993 



Renowned Russian pianist to perform tonight at PC 




Alexander Peskanov 



file photo 



Press Release 

OmCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Alexander Peskanov may have 
nurtured and fine-tuned his piano 
skills in the Ukraine, but audiences 
in the United Stales and Europe are 
reaping the benefits of his 
performances. 

Tonight, Peskanov will bring his 
talents to the Edmunds Hall stage, 
highlighting the 11th annual 
Presbyterian College Piano Clinic 
for teachers and students. The 8:15 
pm concert is open to the public. PC 
students must bring their ID to gain 
admittance. 

Peskanov, a graduate of the 
Stoliarsky School of Music in 



Odessa, Ukraine, received his 
degrees from the Julliard School. 
He made his American debut as 
orchestral soloist with the National 
Symphony under Mstislav 
Rostropovich, who has since invited 
Peskanov to perform with the 
National Symphony at Wolf Trap 
and with the London Symphony 
Orchestra in Albert Hall. 

He was a soloist on the entire 
six-week United States tour of the 
Polish Chamber Orchestra, 
performing at the Kennedy Center 
in Washington, D.C., and at the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art in New 
York City. Peskanov has 



collaborated with such illustrious 
musicians as Yo-Yo Ma, Maurice 
Andre, and Jean-Pierre Rampal. 

Peskanov, a successful 
composer of classical works, 
musicals, and film scores, was 
featured in a PBS television special 
entitled Odessa on the Savannal ■ 
The Music of Alexander Peskanov. 
He is the author of the six-book 
series on The Russian Technical 
Regimen for the Piano and is also 
the founder of The Piano Olympics, 
a program designed to stimulate 
progress in piano pedagogy, 
utilizing the benefits of the Russian 

Piano School. 



SUB Winter Formal set for Saturday night at Clinton Armory 



by Camisha Clarke 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

A Presbyterian College tradition 
continues tomorrow night as the Student 
Union Board (SUB) sponsors its fourth 
annual Winter Formal dance. With the 
bands Curiosity Shoppe and DJ Rolling 
Thunder providing the sounds for this 
evening of elegance, Saturday night should 
consist of a combination of quality 
entertainment and personal merriment. 

Although the amount of student 
participation and enthusiasm for Winter 
Formal have decreased during the past two 
years compared to the first year, SUB is 
expecting a change in the response of the 
studentbody becauseof someof ihechanges 
that have been made this year. In an effort 
to comply with the requests made by .some 
membersof the student bcxly, SUB changed 
the location of the dance from Springs 
Campus Center gym to the National Guard 
Armory in Clinton. Many students 



expressed a desire to 
have the formal off- 
campus so that the 
atmosphere would seem 
to be a formal rather than 
a typical social 
gathering. 

SUB President 
Meg Oxford said, "I 
think [the Armory) will 
draw more people," but 
added, "It's not as 
convenient." 
Nevertheless, the 
enormous size of the Curiosity Shop w 
Armory is an advantage because it allows for 
a unified dance floor and refreshment area. 

In addition to the change of kxation, a 
cash bar will be available this year for those 
students who are above the legal drinking 
age. Spon.sored in part and supplied by 
Springers Restaurant in Laurens, the cash bar 
will .sell non-alcoholic beverages such as 




ill perform tomorrow night at Winter Formal. file photo 



Coke and Pepsi as well. Those people who 
plan to purchase alcoholic beverages from 
this bar should bring proper identification. 
Of course, punch and hors d'(vuvres will be 
served. 

In order to decrease the pt>lential lor 
drunk -driving situations, SUB will provide 
a shuttle running to and from the Armory 



during the hours of the lormal, y:(X) pm to 
I :(X)am. The shuttle will pick up passengers 
from the Spnngs parking lot Anyone willing 
to join in the fight against drmkuig and 
driving may do so by volunteering to drive 
the shutUe tomorrow night. All (K'rsons 
interested should conuict Meg Oxford at 9- 
8.VV957H or Randy Raiukill at Hxt. S4H6. 



Upcoming CEP Events 



January 29 

Concert - Members of the PC Music Department faculty will present a 
recital as the opening event of the 1 llh annual Piano Clinic. 2:00 EH 

January 29 

Concert - Alexander Peskanov, pianist. Peskanov is an internationally 

known soloist, a renowned teacher of the Russian piano tradition, and 

the founder of the Piano Olympics. 8:15 EH 

February 1 

Concert - The American Boyschoir. The choir has performed in 48 

states and over 25 foreign countries, including such venues as the White 

House, the Vatican and Westminster Abbey. Admission by PC student 

ID. 7:30 BA 



February 2 

Convocation - Parker Palmer, author, teacher, activist, and Quaker, will 
speak on issues in education, community, spirituality, and social 

change. 11:00 B A 

February 7 

Concert - Gospel Extravaganza/Black History Month. The PC 

Fellowship Singers will be joined by choirs from other colleges and 

choirs from area churches. 7:00 EH 

February 9 

Convocation - Dr. Bcrnita Berry, Professor of Sociology at John Can-ol 

University, is an outspoken advocate for women and minorities. She is a 

frequent radio and television talk show guest. 1 1:00 BA 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



"Give the people the light, so they may find the way." 



Volume LXXXVIl Number? 



PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 



Clinton. South Carolina 29325 



Friday. Febniary 12, 1993 



SGA Representative raises questions about PC political machine 

Vice President and Secretary deny charges of wrongdoing and corruption 



Elections for next year's Student 
Government Association Executive 
Council arc scheduled to be held 
within two weeks. However, 
according to one member of SGA, 
plans are already being developed 
by certain members ol the current 
Executive Council to create a 
political machine, ensuring the 
successful campaigns of 
candidates from particular 
fraternities on campus. 

Landon Wcstbri)ok, a junior 
class representative, believes that 
certain members of SGA are 
plotting to control next year's 
student government. Westbrook 
Slated that she has been contacted 
by several fraternity members 
who expressed concern about 
being approached to implement a 
political machine at Presbyterian 
College. 

"I have spoken to different 
people around campus, and I believe 
that the creation of a coalition of 
three fraternities is being formed to 
vote in blocks and by proxy for a 
slate of candidates prepared by SGA 
Vice President Ron Mixon and SGA 
Secretary Jeff Garrison. The block 
voting would allow each of the 
involved fraternities to have at least 
one representative on the Executive 
Council," she said. 

According to Westbrook 's 



information, the three fraternities 
involved include Thcta Chi. Sigma 
Nu, and Kappa Alpha Order. 
However, Westbrook points out that 



believe it would weaken SGA, 
because a machine defeats the entire 
purpose of a democratic 
organization," said Westbrook. 







Landon Westbr<)ok Ron Mixon 

not every mcmt)er of the above- 
mentioned fraternities is involved 
in the creation of a machine. 

"It is important to stress that not 
every fraternity member is 
involved," said Westbrook. "I have 
spoken to members of Theta Chi, 
KA. and Sigma Nu who are appalled 
at the suggestion of this plan. It 
involves just certain elements in 
each group who have shown an 
interest in creating a machine." 

"Apparently, the group felt that 
a machine would make SGA a 
stronger organization on campus. I 



On The Inside 



Page 3 . . . 

How safe is PC? Public Safety 
releases the latest crime statistics 
for the campus. 

Page 4 . . . 

Some PC professors share their 
fondest memories of Valentine's 
Day. 

Page 6 . . . 

Coaches Poison and Purcell do 
their best for PC soccer 



Jeff Garrison 

"I think the 
possibility of a machine is highly 
unethical, and it concerns me that 
so much power could be placed in 
the hands of such an inept few," 
added Westbrook. 

SGA Vice President Ron Mixon 
denies that an organized effort to 
create a political machine at PC ever 
existed. "On a personal level, I was 
curious about a machine, but it was 
never pursued. It has become a 
dead issue," he said. 

Mixon stated that the talk of a 
machine on campus has been 



generated by miscommunicaiion. "I 
am sorry that my intentions were 
misunderstood. I am trying to 
further SGA, not hurt it." he said. 
"1 have talked to one or two 
people, asking them their 
thoughts about SGA and 
encouraging them to run for an 
office. I approached these people 
not because they were in a 
fraternity but because they were 
quality people who could help 
SGA," added Mixon. 

SGA Secretary Jeff Garrison 

also denied that he had any part 

in the creation of a political 

machine. Garrison has been 

mentioned as a potential candiate 

for SGA President. "Rumors are 

pretty vicious. Ron Mixon 

mentioned to me that I would 

make a good candidate for SGA 

President next year because 1 have 

seen the inner workings of SGA," 

he said. 

"It is absurd to believe that 
something like this, a machine,' 
could ever work its way out of a 
vicious cycle of rumors and into 
action at a school the size of PC," 
said Garrison. 

"Nothing has ever been 
mentioned to me about a machine. 
I see this as an attempt to discredit 
me. I was not a main player in this 
thing. I was nowhere near the 
playing field," added Garrison. 




/^yyyy pkoio by Km Gikmm^ 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



Postcards from Atlanta: A rural perspective of life in the big city 



by Jason West 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

I guess you could say that I am just a 
country boy - a country boy at heart. I grew 
up and currently live in a rural community 
located in the northernmost portion of 
Kershaw County, South Carolina. My 
neighborhood consists of my house, a cow 
pasture, a couple of horses, and deserted 
country roads. 

This past weekend, 1 had an eye open- 
ing experience. I visited, for the first time, 
the big meu-oplex of Atlanta, Georgia. (I 
know it's hard to believe that I have been a 
Southerner all my life and never visited the 
Empire City of the South.) Needless to say, 
the trip was an eventful one. 

One thing that I found most disturbing 
about Atlanta was the traffic. I have never 
seen a highway that had 12 lanes and thou- 
sands of cars on it. Wearrived in the Atlanta 
area at about4:30 on a Friday afternoon - big 
mistake. Traffic was so congested that I got 
to know the people in the lanes next to me on 
a personal basis, especially the lady in the 
red Honda. 1 became extremely frustrated 
after only moving a mile in an hour's lime 



span. I can't imagine having to put up with 
that type of traffic every day. 

In Kershaw County, we do not have any 
12-lane highways. Four-lane highways do 
exist in the county seat of Camden, but my 
community hasonly two-lane highways and 
dirt roads with potholes. The only traffic 
problems we have are when certain of our 
farming neighbors put their tractors on the 
road to gel to their fields. 

The most interesting place 1 discovered 
in Atlanta was a saiion of town called 
Buckhead. Buckhead had it all - clothing 
stores, restaurants, theaters (one of which 
happened to be an adult type business and 
was playing a feature entitled Treasure 
Chest), night clubs, a place called the Three 
Dollar Cafe, and an interesting shop called 
Condom Sense. 

Condom Sense perplexed me. It was a 
•Store that sold only condoms and related 
accessories, and it appeared to be doing a 
pretty good business. We don't have any 
such businesses in Kershaw County, and I 
don't believe wc will have one any umc 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Editor: 



This is in response to the leuer in the January 29, 1993 issue and request lor an 
explanationofPC's 1991 crime statistics. A robbery, in the Federal Student Right to Know 
and Campus Secunty Act of 1990, is defined as the taking or attempt to take anyihmg 
directly from a person by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the vicum 
in fear. There have been no robberies reported on this campus in the 19 yeiirs of record 
keeping. The writer appeared to be confused between a robbery and a burglary. 

A burglary is defined in the same law as the unlawful enu^ to a structure to commit a 
theft. In 1991, there were 57 burglaries reported with a total of SI 5,4()().0() in losses for the 
entire year. We do encourage students to lock their rooms to help cut down on the Us. 

We welcome the opportunity to explain the statistics. 

Sincerely, 

R. Grey Ma.son, Sr. 
Director of Public Salety 



The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton. South Carolina, 29325 
Volume LXXXVII. Number 7 
February 12. 1993 



Ediior-in-Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor LcJcanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

Sports Editor Everette Catts 

Entertainment Editor Camisha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather Monc-ricf 

Photography Editor Kim Gibstjn 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



Advertismg Editor Ann Mayfield 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Mixon 

Artist Michael Chnsienscn 

Photography Staff 

Kim berlee Gibson Todd I^)Vf 



Staff Writers 
Eli/abclh Cunard 
Leigh Heamburg 
Krisiina PruiU 
Paula Warren 
Brian Sacco 
Kim Rabon 
Tobin Turner 



Amanda Bowers 
Kallicrme Bonner 
Cher Fulbrighl 
Michelle Cantey 
Shelly Phipjps 
Jaiiiey Pale 
Tonya Sncad 



soon. What an eye-opener. 

In addition, my trip to Atlanta itxik me 
downtown, where I got to visit the Wt)rkl ot 
Coke Museum, the CNN Center, Under- 
ground Atlanta, and Pcachuec Pla/a. I also 
got to ride public transporiauon while on my 
mp. Atlanta has st)mething called MART A 
(Metro- Atlanta Rapid Transit Auihoniy). 
The MARTA is a subway, and surprisingly, 
it is clean and seems to be sale. I have 
always pictured subways as dirty ratholcs 
where people get shot and stabbed. This was 
not die case in Atlant;i. 

Atlanta was and is an intcrcsimg place. 
It is truly a cosmopolitan city which thrives 
on diversity and is destined to have a bright 
luture.especiallywiUi the Olympics com inj! 
in 19%. However. Atlantadid not swmg mo 
over to life in the big city. True, it has more 
material things to offer than a community 
like Kershaw County. There ;ire more jobs 
available, more places toeat and shop, more 
museums and places of culture to visit, etc 
However, Kershaw County has something 
to offer also. 



In Kershaw County, we don't have unf- 
fic problems. There is plenty of blue sky and 
green fields for everyone to enjoy, and we 
have no major crime problems. (Sometimes 
we even leave our windows open during the 
summer months.) 

We are limited in the places that we can 
shoj) and eat. However, restaurants like the 
Rainbow Shop and Blackmon's Little 
Midget in Camden and Mama's Kitchen in 
Bethune do provide some gcxxl, down-home 
meals. Wc also have very few places to 
gather lor s(Kiali/ation. Sometimes.church 
is the only real place people in the community 
can scK'iali/e with each other. I guarantee 
you that It's better to scxiaJ I/eat church than 
in an adult theater in Buckhead ora store like 
Condom Sense. 

1 appreciate Atlanta for what it is. I can 
even appreciate why .some people would 
want to live there. However. Atlanta is not 
lor me It is a nice place to visit, but I'll take 
the green t le Ids and K)iiely roads ol Kershaw 
County any day. .Sometimes, youjasigotto 
be true to the lami boy inside. 



Letter to the ViWinr PnVuy 

Any .student wishing to place a letter to the editor in the Blue 
:^t(Hkin^ imsl tuni in a signed letter one week before publi- 
cation Unsigned letters will not be printed under anv cir- 
cum.stances. Questions conceminulhis pi)licv shouFd \x 
directed to Jason West, editor-in-cniet, or Dr. "Neal Prater, 

stall advisor. 

'Hie deadline to have a letter in the next issue is l-'ridav, l-eb- 

ruary IM, 1993. 



I he Blue Stoclung is a in weekly student publi 
cation of Presbyterian College. The paper serves 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional and 
nalional concern. For advertising, conlact t hf 
BlueStoilang. Presbyterian College. Box UX, 1 . 
Clinton. SC 2932.V I he Blue Sunlung wel 
comes leilcrs to the ediU)r from all nicmk-rs of 
the PC comnuinily Signatures are re.iuired 
Utters arc printed on a space available ba.sis 
The Blue Sum king reserves the righl to edit ail 
letters for jiroper grammar and imnctuation 
The final deadline for sutmulling Icliers is In 
dayat 12;()0pmon liie week before jnibhcaiion 




FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



FEATURES 



PC 



Jidbifs 



SGA elections scheduled 

The Student Government 
A.ssociation has set the dates for elections 
for next year's student council. 
Applications for membership on the 
Executive Council (SGA President, Vice 
President, Secretary, Treasurer, SUB 
President, and Judicial Chair) have been 
sent to all student boxes and are due 
Friday, February 19. Speeches for 
Executive Council will be held on 
February 22 at 7:(K) pm in Springs. 
Elections lor Executive Council are set 
for Monday, February 25. with a run-off 
set for FebruiU7 26 if necessary. 

Applications for class olTicers iu-e 
due on Friday, February 26. Speeches 
will be made on Maah 1 at 7;(X) pm in 
Springs. Elections for class officers are 
set for Tuesdty, March 2, with a runoff 
scheduled lor Maah } if necessary. 

PC to participate in drill 

Severe Weather Awareness Week 
will be observed February 21 - 27. On 
February 24, I^esbyterian College will 
participate in a slate-wide disa.sier drill, 
sponsored by the National Weather 
Service, the State Emergency 
Preparedness Division, and the Laurens 
County Emergency Service. During tliis 
drill, professors are asked to stop class 
and explain di.sasu'r procedures. Students 
who have questions regarding disaster 
preparedness should contact Public 
Safety. 

Summer internship offered 

lor nine weeks during the summer, 
ten Soudi Carolina rising ct)llege seniors 
will have the opportunity to learn first 
hand about key issues such as jxiblic 
power and the envmmmcnt through the 
Santee Cooper Summer Internship 
Program 

In orikr to partic ipate in the program . 
a student must be a resident of Smith 
Carolina and enrolled in a South Carolina 
college or university. A student must 
also have a .VO GPA lor courses utken 
during the sophomore year and must have 
completed a minimum of 24 credit hours 
during that year as well as during tlie 
lunior ye;u-. A completed application, 
accompaniedbyacollegetranscripl.must 
be submitted to your state legislati>r l'i>r 
an application and brtKhure, cimtact the 
( )l lice of Career I'laniuiig .uul Placement. 
Kvated in R(H>m 215 of Douglas Mouse. 

IIFH worktrips scheduled 

Habitat lor lhiiiiaiut\ sponsors 
worktrips every Saturday in I aurens. 
Contact Hon Hull (HI 10) if you'd like to 
help. The next chapter meeting is set for 
Wednesday, March 17 ,ii ^iw)pm 



PC Campus Crime Statistics 



Crimes (Violent & Non-Violent) 

Aggravated Assault 

Burglary 

Disorderly Conduct 

Fraud 

Harassment 

Obscene Phone CalKs 

Tampering with Fire Equipment 

Sex Offen.scs (Indecent Exposure) 

Simple As.saull 

Trespassing 

DUI 

Arrests 

Alcohol Violalion.s 
Drug Violations 
Weapons Violations 



1992 

1 

66 

9 

4 

4 

n 

19 

2 

7 

28 

1 

mi 

3 



1 



1991 



57 

6 

2 

4 

7 

15 

4 

5 

14 

5 

mi 

5 
1 

n 





65 

6 

4 

2 

6 

6 

1 

1 



8 

1990 

19 







Campus crime statistics show increase for last year 



by Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 

Hie 1^^)2 year at Presbyterian Col- 
lege, which ended this past December, saw 
a slight increase in criminal activity. Statis- 
tics released from the Public Safely office 
showed an increase in the number of bur- 
glaries, weaixms violauon arrests, obscene 
phone calls, disorderly conduct, complaints 
of u-espassing. and simple assault ca.ses on 
campus. 



The numbers indicate that there were 
66 burglaries at PC last year, which resulted 
in SI8.S66 worth of lost meahandise. Of 
that amount, SI .350 was recovered. In 1991 . 
57 burglaries were reported w ith a total loss 
ol$l5,4(K), 

As far as alcohol violations on campus, 
three students were arrested last year. That 
IS down from five students in 1991. Off 



campus arrests for alcohol violations num- 
bered 1 5 in 1992. down from 1 8 the previous 
year. 

Obscene phone calls were up in 1992. 
A total of 1 1 were reported, which is up from 
7 m 1991. In addition, disorderly conduct 
violations were up by three la.st year, fraud 
cases were up by two, and charges of tres- 
passing were up by 14. 



Caldwell Harper Theater dedication slated for next week 



by Steve Owens 
(JUEST WRITER 

A special twinkle enters Dr. Dale Rains' 

eyes when he talks abt)ut the Har^x-r Center 
the same twinkle of antic ip;iUon and pride 

seen inchildren'scyesonChnsUTias morning 

when they are about to o|X'n that k)ng- 

awaited present. 

l-'or Rams, I^otessor 

of Sjvech and Drama, the 

eager an.xiousness is 

understandable, because 

the Harper Center is a 

present he has included on 

his wish list since joinini! 

the F*resbytenan College 

faculty in 1967. 

"I'm simply elated 

This building iseverythini' 

I ho{vdit wt)uldlv,aiul it 

IS the thing I have Iven 

Ux)king lorward \o lor 2*^ 
years," Rains s.ik1 It Ihe Harpt-r C 
really has given me new life as a professor. 
I'm more excited than I have been in years." 
Ilie facility, built at an approximate 
cost of SI. 4 million, ()pc-ned its diK)rs to 
students beginnini; m Janiuiry Housing 
three faculty and sialtollicesandclassriX)ms, 
It will \x the new home lor the college's 
theater arts students. Rams, and Assistant 
Prolessor ol Theater Arts l.esles Preston, 
Overkx)king the lake on the college's Ea.sl 
Phua. the Har]X'r Center will replace the 
deparunent's ciamivd quarters in l>niglas 
Mouse 



The move will allow the college s art 
deparunent to assume use of the entire first 
ncx)rof die [Xiuglas House. The deparunent 
will also benefit from a highlight of the 
I larjx-r Center - a spacious art gallery w hich 
will allow AsstKiaie Professor of Art Mark 
Anderson and AsscKiate Professor of Art 
Dr. Bob Hild to bring larger art exhibits on 




enter has been under construction for near 

campus Currendy. the auditorium in the 
James H. fhomason Library is used lor .u^i 
shows. 

Rams IS es|vcially excited aK>ui the 
^6(X) squarel(x>t Caldwell Harper Theater, 
a tlexible theater designed to accomnuHlaie 
as manv as 200 seats. Adjacent to the theater 
;ire a prop shop, a spacious make-up rcxmi, 
dressing rixnns, a costume shop, and a 
meeting r(X)m. The actors in those rixims 
may communicate w iih the technical Kxnh 
via an intercom system, and the backstage 
area is w ired lor closed-circuit television to 



allow others to slay abreast of the action. 

The massive project was made possible 
through ihe'Building from Sirength'Capital 
Campaign and a major gift from Caldwell 
Harper of Greenville, SC, for whom the 
theater is named. The entire building is 
named in honor of the Harper family, 
"1 was on the committee when we 
renovated Jacobs Hall and 
moved the little black box 
theater to the Douglas 
House," Harper said. "It 
came to my attention that 
we could re-establish ihc 
theater and create a lacilitv 
that would be of interest 
not only to the college but 
also to the community 
because it has so many uses 
It was quite a challenge for 
us to accept, but I was 
ly a vear. absolutely delighted w hen 

we nau the recepuon there (during the joint 
Knu^d meeting in November). I feel that it is 
going to be a real asset to the college." 

It IS the Harper Center, however, that 
excites RainsOpcning night for the Caldwell 
Harpc>r Theater will be February 17, |99\ 
the first of fivedaysofspaial events planned 
to celebrate the new facility. The Harper 
Center will officially be dedicated on 
Saturday. February 20. The opening 
ixnformance will be William Shakespeare's 
A Midsummer Nighi' s Dream, marking the 
third ume Rams will have staged that play. 



FEATURES 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



POLITICS 



Love abounds on campus: 

PC professors share their own special stories of love and romance 




by Christie Grant 

STAFF WRITER 

While Cupid aims his arrows at various 
students around campus this weekend, several 
professors will also be struck by the loves in 
their own lives. The following article is a 
collection of memorable love stories told by 
members of the PC faculty. 

4> * * * 

Dr. Jim Skinner, an English professor, 
found the love of his life while attending 
military school at North Georgia College. 
"When breakfast time arrived at school, the 
girls on campus ate before the men. As the 
men arrived in the dining hall, the girls would 
be putting up their trays, gelling ready lo 
exit," he said. "One day, I saw this girl 
putting up her tray. 1 pointed over to her and 
told a friend that that was the woman I was 
going to marry." 

Skinner's prediction proved to be true, 
as he did marry the girl whom he saw putting 
up her breakfast u-ay. 

"When I proposed lo her, I promised tliat 
I would be a lovmg and faithful husband. 
However, I told her thai there would always 
be another woman in my life - Elizabeth 
Bennet, the heroine of Pride and Prejudice," 
added Skinner. 

* * * * 

Other campus love stories offer insight 
into international Valentine customs. 

* * * * 

Jim Wetzel, a PC biology instructor, met 
his wife while leaching an English cla.ss at a 
YMCA in Japan. "On the second night of the 
class, one of the students walked in, and it 
was love at first sight," said Wetzel. 

"In Japan, women marry while they are 
very young. I was lucky, because this girl 
wasclose to my age and smgle," added Wetzel. 

Japanese dating customs nearly got in 
the way of Wetzel's court.ship. "In Japan, we 
were forced to first date in groups instead of 
the typical American one-on-one dale. I 
wailed until her thirtieth birthday and .sent her 
30 roses. It took 30 roses to get her to go out 
for a cup of coffee with me," said Wetzel. 

He proposed to his bride-to-be at 
Christmastime, and the couple now has two 
three-year-old twin sons. One speaks llucni 
Japanese and the other son excels in English. 

Wetzel reports that the Japanese have a 






Valentine's Day on February 14. Onihaiday, 
women send men chocolate. In addition, 
doctors receive chocolate from their patients, 
and male teachers receive it from their stu- 
dents. On March 14, known as While Day, 
men give iheir sweethearts white chocolate. 

• * * * 

Lu-ying Yang, a visiting professor from 
China, said that dating is treated more seri- 
ously in her country than in the United Slates. 
"When you are dating someone in Chi na, you 
will marry them. In America, dating means 
nothing. But in China, dating means a lot," 
she said. 

"There is no officially recognized 
Valentine's Day in China. However, there 
are a few young people who know about this 
day, so they exchange cards and gills. Most 

people are not familiar with the holiday," said 
Yang. 





Dr. Hudson's son, Noel, now ten years old, cuddles a rabbit in a picture 
submitted from the Hudson family album. Dr. Hudson and his family 
adopted Noel from the Phillipines several years ajjo. phou, by Hudson 



Comments on love and our son Noel . . . 

Love has many facets; however, when I think of "true love," I agree with C.S. 
Lewis and think of a love that is similar to lovmg myself. At limes, 1 don't even 
like myself, but 1 do love myself any way. When I truly k)ve .someone, it is not jusi 
during the umcs that the hormones arc high, or my altruism is elevated because 
of some goodness thai ihcy have just done for me, but it is a consistent love that 
persists through all phases of life. 

When Linda, our girls and I adopted Noel, it was not because we were 
infertile. We wanted to have a ihird child but thought we should help a child that 
was already in the world raiher than add another member to the already exploding 
population. At that Umc, the Philippines had c)ri)hanages with over WK) children 
in ihcm on one meal a day, which was nearly all rice. When Noel lirsi arrived at 
our hou.se, he would eat nothing but rice, which he would cram into his mouth until 
his cheeks bulgal. Ihen when he knew that Uus aniouni of ftxKl was safely his, 
he would begin to try and chew and swallow. 

Love IS truly universal. N(K'1 k-gan lo ojK-n up lo us wiihin thirty minutes 
after arriving at ihc airpori. By mghUall. he would jump off ihc steps into my anns 

(add mile sign ul irusl. . silly child! ), 1 le has hroughi so much joy to our family 
that we cannot imagine life wiUiout him. Although each child is an individual, 
Noel certainly has no major differences in rcs|X)nse to us as jxircnis than do either 
o our daughters. We wholeheartedly recommend overseas adoption as an 
allcmalivo to having your own nuliiral tx)rn third child. 



-by Dr. Boh Hudscm 
PC lliology Depl. 



Proposal to allow gays in military causes division in Congress 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

Homosexuals in today's society 
have become increasingly prominent in 
the news recently, from Colorado's 
"anii-gay" referendum to the continuing 
effects of AIDS. Now, in what is 
President Clinton's first political fight, 
the nearly 50-year-old ban on gays in 
the military is under fire. 

Clinton's promise to remove the 
ban was a minor pledge during his 
campaign, wedged between reforms for 
health care and plans for the economy. 
But the gay ban issue has caused Ginion 
to expend some much needed political 
capital and has put him at odds with 
both the Joint Chiefs of Staff and 
Georgia SenaiorSamNunn, head of tlie 
Senate Armed Services Committee. 

Clinton's problem, say some 
insiders, was his being unprepared to 
deal wiih the powerful military leaders 
and innuentialmcmbcrsof Congress as 
well as with the leaks ihat seemed to 
surface at every stage of the 
negotiations. When General Colin 
Powell, Chaimian of the Joint Chiefs. 
s[H>ke out against removing the ban, 
some gay activists became worried that 
Clinton was backing off his pn)mise 
and leaked word to the press. The 



president was already under pressure 
for changing his stance on the gasoline 
tax and the middle class tax cut. 
However, he reaffirmed his 
commitment a few days later, saying, 
"Removing the ban is not an issue; only 
how and when it will be removed is." 
Clinton's hard-line approach seemed 
to make the Joint Chiefs more resistant 
to any compromise on the ban. As 
Arizona Senator John McCain put it, 
"A smarter scenario would have been 
to ask (the Chiefs) down to Little Rock 
. . . and say, 'Look, I made this 
commitment, help me work my way 
through this.' Instead, the Chiefs were 
just told to do this and that." Clinton 
also had to deal with Senator Nunn, 
who recently gave a 25 -minute speech 
in the Senate, raising over 40 questions 
on the issue. 

In subsequent meetings, a 
compromise was worked out between 
Senator Nunn and the President. The 
pracuceofasking military recruits about 
their sexual oneniation will be stopped 
immediately. In the coming months. 
Defense Secretary Les Aspin will work 
on ihe exact wording of the Executive 
Order, which will be signed on July 
1 5lh. Also, homosexuals who are in the 
service and come forward between now 



and mid-July will be separated from 
active duty and placed in a special 
reserve. 

With Senator Nunn supporting 
Clinton, there is little doubt that the 
Republicans and some conservative 
Democrats will not be able to pass the 
ban into law, as they are now trying to 
do. Even if they could - and then 
override a presidential veto - the law's 
constitutionality would come under 
question. Ajudge in a California federal 
court recently ruled that a discharge 
from the armed services based on sexual 
orientation is unconstitutional, based 
on the equal-protection clause of the 
14th Amendment. 

The issue becomes more 
complicated when one looks at the 
details involved in lifting the ban. For 
instance, what should be done about 
sleeping quarters or shower facilities? 
Are there areas in the military where 
homosexuals would disrupt the unity, 
and tlierefore the effectiveness, of the 
various units? The safely of known 
homosexuals as well as methods to 
identify discrimination are issues that 
must al.so be addressed. As one Navy 
petty officerpul it, "Your superiors will 
find ways not to promote you" if you 
"come out of the closet." 



The more formidable task for 
Clinton will be changing the current 
anti-gay culture in the military itself. 
Many homosexuals will keep their 
secret hidden, even if the ban is lifted, 
lo avoid insults and physical attacks. 
There are reports that known or 
suspected gays have been harassed by 
their fellow servicemen, with spray- 
painted signs on lockers or even "blanket 
parties," in which the victim is held 
under covers and then beaten. There 
are even reports that people have been 
forced into their wall lockers while the 
lights were out and then thrown out of 
a second or third story window. Those 
who know about such attacks usually 
keep quiet for fear of being next. 

President Clinton and Les Aspin 
have until July to solve these problems 
in a way agreeable to everyone involved. 
Clinton is eager to get this situation 
behind him, so that he can work on 
other problems that were "central to the 
campaign." One aide said, in reference 
to the President's frustration, that the 
administration needs to "get the whole 
thing out of the way and gel back to 
work." Still, if such a seemingly 
uncomplicated issue can take up so 
much lime, one wonders what will 
happen when the President must face 
the complexity of, say, the deficit. 



What do PC students think about allowing homosexuals in the military? 



Senior Marlcnc Neal, psychology major 
— ""l think the ban should be lifted. I don't 
ihittk cither sex g(x;s to b(XK camp to find a 
dale. Anyone who wants lo fight for their 
lounu^ should have thai nghi, mi maticr 
whai ihcir sexual oncniauon is. They arc 
tiglHing lor the same cause." 



Cadet 2LT Brad Williams, 55B 10. 450ih 
ORD Co. -- "I feel that a person's sexual 
oncntauon in most ca.ses will not interfere 
with the performance of their duues. The 
Army's motto is 'Duly, Honor, Counu^;' 
therefore. I am of the opinion that if a soldier 
performs his or her duly to the standard 
which IS set, sexual oncntauon should not 
be questioned. Having served with a 
homosexual. I have found that his sexual 
preference m no way affected his 
performance as a soldier, nor did it infnnge 
upon my choice U) be heieniscxual." 



Senior political science major Shelley 
Phipps — "I believe lifung the ban on gays 
in the military will be deu-imental to the 
cohesiveness and the morale ihat is cmcial 
to the success of our armed forces." 



Sophomore Alicia Perry, Christian ed. 
major— "I believe thai homosexuals should 
be allowed lo serve their country, because 
they are not less human or capable than 
heterosexuals. To deny a homosexual his or 
her right lo serve their country is 
discriminatory, which I believe lobe immoral 
as well as being unconsuiuiional. To me, 
the whole issue boils down to respecting 
each other's differences, whether they be 
sexual oneniation, race, or gender." 



FLAG group seeks to promote diversity on campus 



by LrJeanna Maddox 
MANACilNG EDITOR 

According to a statement 
released lo the Blue Stockirtf^ this 
week, an informal FLAG group has 
formed on the Presbyterian College 
i-ampus. 

In Its statement of purpose, the 
Kroup is organizing "in the spirit of 
enhancing diversity on the 
Prcsbyierian College campus." 
Iriends of Lesbians and Gays was 
lounded on the principles ot 
t'ducaling both its members and non 
members about the nature of and 
issues involved m sexual 
orientation, including homo-, 
hctcro-, and bisexualily. 



Through the educational 
activities presented by FLAG, 
members seek to "encourage others 
to learn about various ways of living 
in order to develop tolerance and 
understanding of all orientations." 
According to the statement. FLAG 
IS not affiliated with any political 
organization; il is essentially an 
educational, support, and social 
group for everyone. 

Several faculty niciuhcis have 
expressed their support for the 
group. Dr. Terry Barr. assistant 
professorof English, said, "I respect 
and encourage any minority group's 



right to heighten awareness of 
sensitive issues and to educate 
people to become more open and 
tolerant Therefore," he added, "I 
am completely supportive of the 
formation of the FLAG group as a 
means to fight hatred, 
discrimination, and ignorance" 

Dr. Dave Gillespie, professorof 
political science, added his support, 
emphasizing that the group is 
composed of a variety of 
individuals, both homosexual and 
heterosexual. "According to most 
accounts, ten percent ol President 
Bush's military, ten percent of 



President Clinton's military, ten 
percent of the student body is 
homosexual," he said. "In a FLAG 
group, the percentages may be 
different, but the same principle 
holds. In PC's FLAG, there are 
people of both sexual orientations. 
More to the point, they are among 
your friends and neighbors in the 
PC community. I admire their 
courage in setting up FLAG here." 
If any student is interested in 
attending the group's meetings, 
please respond to Box 1097. 



FEATURES 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



POLITICS 



Love abounds on campus: 

PC professors share their own special stories of love and romance 




by Christie Grant 

STAFF WRITER 

While Cupid aims his arrows at various 
students around campus this weekend, several 
professors will also be struck by the loves in 
their own lives. The following article is a 
collection of memorable love stories told by 
members of the PC faculty. 

* * * • 

Dr. Jim Skinner, an English professor, 
found the love of his life while attending 
military school at North Georgia College. 
"When breakfast time arrived at .school, the 
girls on campus ate before the men. As the 
men arrived in the dining hall, the girls would 
be putting up their trays, getting ready to 
exit," he said. "One day, 1 saw this girl 
putting up her tray. I pointed over to her and 
told a friend that that was the woman 1 was 
going to marry." 

Skinner's prediction proved to be true, 
as he did marry the girl whom he saw pulling 
up her breakfast u-ay. 

"When I propo.'icd lo her, I promised thai 
I would be a loving and faiiliful husband. 
However, 1 lold her thai there would always 
be another woman in my life - Elizabeth 
Bennet, the heroine of Pride and Prejudice" 
added Skinner. 

* * * * 

Other campus love stories offer insight 
into international Valentine customs. 

• * * * 

Jim Wetzel, a PC biology instructor, met 
his wife while teaching an English class at a 
YMCA in Japan. "On the second night of the 
class, one of the students walked in, and it 
was love at first sight," said Wetzel. 

"In Japan, women marry while they are 
very young. I was lucky, because this girl 
was close to m y age and single," added Wetzel . 

Japanese dating customs nearly got in 
the way of Wetzel's courtship. "In Japan, we 
were forced to first date in groups instead of 
the typical American one-on-one date. I 
waited until her thirtieth birthday and sent her 
30 roses. It took 30 roses to get her to go out 
for a cup of coffee with me," said Wetzel. 

He proposed to his bride-to-be ai 
Christmastime, and the couple now has two 
three-year-old iwm st)ns. One speaks fluent 
Japanese and the other son excels in English. 

Wetzel reports thai ihe Japanese have a 






Valentine's Day on February 14. On that day, 
women send men chocolate. In addition, 
doctors receive chocolate from their patients, 
and male teachers receive it from their stu- 
dents. On March 14, known as White Day, 
men give their sweethearts white chocolate. 

* * * * 

Lu-ying Yang, a visiting professor from 
China, said that dating is treated more seri- 
ously in her counu-y than in the United Slates. 
"When you are dating .someone in China, you 
will marry them. In America, daung means 
nothing. But in China, dating means a lot," 
she said. 

"There is no officially recognized 
Valentine's Day in China. However, ihere 
arc a few young people who know about this 
day. so ihcy exchange cards and gifts. Most 
people arc nol familiar with the holiday." said 
Yang. 





Dr. Hudson's son, Nwl, now ten years old. cuddles a rabbit in a picture 
submitted from the Hudson family album. Dr. Hudson and his family 
adopted Noel from the Phillipines several years ago. photo by Hudson 



Comment.s on love and our son Noel 

Love has many lacets; however, when I ihmk of "true love " I agree with C S 
Lewis and think of a love dial is similar lo loving myself. At times, 1 don't even 
like myself, but 1 do love myself any way When I truly love scmieone, it is nol just 
during the umcs thai the hormones are high, or my altruism is elevated because 
of some goodness thai ihcy have jusi done lor me. bui ii is a consistent love that 
persists through all phases of life 

When Linda, our girls and 1 adopted Noel, it was nol bccau.se we were 
infertile. We warned lo have a third child bui thought we should help a child that 
was already in ihe world railier than add another membc-r to Uk- already exploding 
population. At ihai Ume, ihc Philippines had orphanages wiih over WX) children 
in them on one meal a day. which was nearly all rice. When Noel first arrived at 
our hou.sc. he would eai nothing but rico, which he would cram into his mouth until 
his checks^bulgcd. Tlicn when he knew dial ih.s amount of ((hhI was safely his. 
he would begin lo try and chew and swallow 

lx)ve IS truly universal. Nwl began u, „,x'n up u, us wiihin thirty nunuies 
after am ving at the aupori. By n.ghifal I. he would jump off d,c slops into my anns 
(a dcfinilc sign ol irusi. .silly child' ,, 1 Ic has brought so iiiuch joy lo cur lamily 
dial we cannot imagine life widioui him. Alihuugh each child is an individual, 
Noel cerlainly has no major differences in res|X)nse lo us as ,x.renis than do eiiher 
of our daughters We wholeheariedly recommend oversells adoption as an 
aliemativo lo having your own natural U)rn ihird child. 



—by Dr. Hob Hudson 
PC jiiohigy Depl. 



Proposal to allow gays in military causes division in Congress 



byTedCarmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

Homosexuals in today's society 
have become increasingly prominent in 
Uie news recently, from Colorado's 
"anii-gay" rcfctx^ndum to the continuing 
effects of AIDS. Now, in what is 
President Clinton's first political fight, 
the nearly .5()-ycar-old ban on gays in 
the military is under fire. 

Clinton's promise lo remove the 
ban was a minor pledge during his 
campaign, wedged between reforms for 
health care and plans for the economy. 
But the gay ban issue has caused Ginion 
to expend some much needed political 
capital and has put him at odds with 
both the Joint Chiefs of Staff and 
(Jeorgia .Senator Sam Nunn. head of the 
Senate Amied Services Committee. 

Clinton's problem, say some 
insiders, was his being unprepared to 
deal wiih the powerful military leaders 
and inlluentialmcmbcrsof Congress as 
well as with the leaks thai seemed to 
surface at every stage of the 
negoiiamms When General Colin 
Powell. Chaimian of the Joint Chiefs, 
s{H)ke out against removing the ban, 
some gay activists became worned that 
Clinton was backing off his pn)mise 
and leaked word to the press. The 



president was already under pressure 
for changing his stance on the gasoline 
tax and the middle class tax cut. 
However, he reaffirmed his 
commitment a few days later, saying, 
"Removing the ban is not an issue; only 
how and when it will be removed is." 
Clinton'shard-line approach seemed 
to make the Joint Chiefs more resistant 
to any compromise on the ban. As 
Arizona Senator John McCain put it, 
"A smarter scenario would have been 
to ask [the Chiefs] down to Little Rock 
. . . and say, 'Look. 1 made this 
commitment, help me work my way 
through this.' Instead, the Chiefs were 
just told to do Uiis and that." Clinton 
also had to deal with Senator Nunn, 
who recently gave a 25-minutc speech 
in the Senate, raising over 40 tjuesiions 

on the issue. 

In subsequent meetings, a 
compromise was worked out between 
Senator Nunn and the President. The 
practiceofasking military recruits about 
iheir sexual orientation will be slopped 
immediately. In the coming months. 
Defense Secretary Les Aspm will work 
on the exact wording of the Executive 
Order, which will be signed on July 
1 5 th. Also, homosexuals who are in the 
serv ice and come forward between now 



and mid-July will be separated from 
active duty and placed in a special 
reserve. 

With Senator Nunn supporting 
Clinton, there is little doubt that the 
Republicans and some conservative 
Democrats will not be able to pass the 
ban into law, as they are now trying to 
do. Even if they could - and then 
override a presidential veto - the law's 
constitutionality would come under 
question. Ajudgc in aCalifomia federal 
couri recently ruled that a discharge 
from the armed services based on sexual 
orientation is unconstitutional, based 
on the equal-protection clause of the 
14th Amendment. 

The issue becomes more 
complicated when one looks at the 
details involved in lifting the ban. For 
instance, what should be done about 
sleeping quarters or shower facilities? 
Arc there areas in the military where 
homosexuals would disrupt the unity, 
and therefore the effectiveness, of the 
various units? The safety of known 
homosexuals as well as methods to 
identify discrimination are issues that 
must also be addressed. As one Navy 
petty officerput it, "Your superiors will 
find ways not to promote you" if you 
"come out of the closet." 



The more formidable task for 
Clinton will be changing the current 
anti-gay culture in the military itself. 
Many homosexuals will keep their 
secret hidden, even if the ban is lifted, 
to avoid insults and physical attacks. 
There are reports that known or 
suspected gays have been harassed by 
their fellow servicemen, with spray- 
painted signs on lockers or even "blanket 
parties," in which the victim is held 
under covers and then beaten. There 
are even reports that people have been 
forced into their wall lockers while the 
lights were out and then thrown out of 
a second or third story window. Those 
who know about such attacks usually 
keep quiet for fear of being next. 

President Clinton and Les Aspin 
have until July to solve these problems 
in a way agreeable to everyone involved. 
Clinton is eager to get this situation 
behind him, so that he can work on 
other problems that were "central to the 
campaign." One aide said, in reference 
to the President's frustration, that the 
administration needs to "get the whole 
thing out of the way and get back to 
work." Still, if such a seemingly 
uncomplicated issue can take up so 
much time, one wonders what will 
happen when the President must face 
the complexity of, say, the deficit. 



What do PC students think about allowing homosexuals in the military? 



Senior Marlcnc Neal. psychology major 
"I think the ban should be lifiexl. I don't 
ihiiA cither sex goes to b(XH camp to find a 
date. Anyone who wants U) fight for their 
nHintry should have that nghi. no matter 
whai their sexual orientation is. They are 
lighting for the same cause." 



Cadet 2LT Brad Williams, 55B 10, 450th 
ORD Co. — "I feel that a perst^n's sexual 
orientation in most cases will nol interfere 
witb the performance of ihcir duucs. The 
Army's motto is 'Duly, Honor, Counuy;' 
therefore. 1 am of die opinion ihat if a soldier 
perfomis his or her duly to the standard 
which is set. sexual onentation should not 
be questioned. Having served with a 
homosexual, 1 have found that his sexual 
preference in no way affected his 
perfonnance as a soldier, nor did it infnnge 
upon my choice to be heterosexual." 



Senior political science major Shelley 
Phipps — "1 believe lifting the ban on gays 
in the military will be deunmental to the 
cohesiveness and the morale that is cmcial 
lo the success of our armed forces." 



Sophomore Alicia Perry, Christian ed. 
mapr — "I believe that homosexuals should 
be allowed to serve thetf country, because 
they are not less human or capable than 
heterosexuals. Todeny a homosexual his or 
her right lo serve their country is 
discnminaiory, which 1 believe to be immoral 
as well as being unconsututional. To me, 
the whole issue boils down to rcspeciing 
each other's differences, whether they be 
sexual onentation, race, or gender." 



FLAG group seeks to promote diversity on campus 



by l^Jeanna Maddox 
MANACilNC) EDITOR 

According to a statement 
released to the Blue Stockinfi this 
week, an informal FLAG group has 
formed on the Presbyterian College 
campus. 

In Its statement of purpose, the 
group IS organizing "in the spirit ol 
enhancing diversity on the 
Presbyterian College campus." 
Iricnds of Lesbians and Gays was 
founded on the principles of 
educating both its members and non 
members about the nature of and 
issues involved m sexual 
onentation, including homo-, 
hetcro-, and biscxuality 



Through the educational 
activities presented by FLAG, 
members seek to "encourage others 
to learn about various ways of living 
in order to develop tolerance and 
understanding of all orientations." 
According to the statement, FLAG 
IS not affiliated with any political 
organization; il is essentially an 
educational, support, and social 
group for everyone 

Several facull> members have 
expressed their support for the 
group. Dr. Terry Barr. assistant 
professorofEnglish. said. "I respect 
and encourage any minority group's 



right to heighten awareness of 
sensitive issues and to educate 
people to become more open and 
tolerant. Therefore," he added, "I 
am completely supportive of the 
formation of the FLAG group as a 
means to fighi haired, 
discrimination, and ignorance." 

Dr. Dave Gillespie, professorof 
political science, added his support, 
emphasizing that the group is 
composed of a variety of 
individuals, both homosexual and 
heieroscxual. "According to most 
accounts, ten percent of President 
Bush's military, ten percent of 



President Clinton's military, ten 
percent of the student body is 
homosexual," he said. "In a FLAG 
group, the percentages may be 
different, but the same principle 
holds. In PC's FLAG, there arc 
people of both sexual orientations. 
More to the point, they arc among 
your friends and neighbors in the 
PC community. I admire their 
courage in setting up FLAG here." 
If any student is interested in 
attending the group's meetings, 
please respond to Box 1097. 



SPORTS 



FRIDAY, t-HBRUARY 12,1993 



Poison and Purcell prove true dedication to sport of soccer 



by Brian Sacco 
STAFF WRITER 

Less ihan a decade ago, many Americans 
had no idea what the sport of soccer was all 
aboul, and some considered it a game ihai 
only Europeans played. 

However, in 1993, soccer has grown 
and continues to grow in popularity the 
soccer program at Presbyterian College has 
grown as well, thanks to the dedication of 
Ralph Poison and Brian Purcell. 

Ralph Poison completed his tenth season 
asheadcoachof the Blue Ho.se men'ssoccer 
team this past year, compiling a record of 
109-62-17. Since coming to PC m 1983, he 
has led the Blue Ho,sc to nine consecutive 
NAIApost-season tournament appearances. 

A 1980 graduate of Erskine College, 
Poison earned his B.S. in chemistry. While 
at Erskine, he was a four-year lettennan at 
goalkeeper. In July of 1988, Poison 
completed his M.S.S. degree in sports 
management from the United States Sports 
Academy. 

Throughouthiscarccrasacoach, Poison 
has been honored with numerous awards. In 
1986and 1988, he was named NAl A District 
6 and Area 9 Coach of the Year. In 1992. 
Poison was named SAC Coach of the Year. 
He has also served as the NAIA District 6 
and Area 9 Soccer Chairman as well as a 
mcmberof the NAIA National Ratmg Board. 
In 1989, Poison was named assistant coach 
of the East Squad for the first NAIA ScKcer 
Senior Bowl. He currently serves as State 
Coach for Boys for the South Carolina Youth 
Soccer Association Select Team Program 
and staff coach for the USYSA Region 
Three Olympic Developmental Program. 

Pol.son conirihulcs his success to the 



influence of his father. "My father always swcer is obvious. He has proven to be a 

said that a person could do whatever he valuable asset to Presbyterian College. He 

wanted if he put his mind to It. Once I chose is an excellent coach and one who develops 

my direction, he was always there to support players who reach dieir highest capahiliiies 

me and encourage me or even console me," under his direcuon," he said. 




Coaches Poison and Purcell provide the leadership for PC smcer. photo by lodd Love 

Pol.son also draws credit from Ins 
players. "Coach Poison's best altribulc is 
his friendship-type relationships with 



he said. 

"I feel successful as a coach when I 
have recruited the type of siudeni-athleic 
that has been successful on the field and in 
the cla.ssroom," said Poison. 

PC Athletic Director Cally C.aull had 
high praise for Poison. "Coach Poison has 
done a splendid job in crafting one of the 
best stKCcr programs in the South. His 
dedication to his players, to PC, and to 



players. When we have problems, we can 
always go to him. I really enjoyed playing 
lor him. and 1 will miss him, " said Senior 
Will Lindstrom. 

"I have enjoyed my ten years of service 
to PC soccer. 1 have never regretted my 
decision lo assume the resp(msibility i)f the 



program. There have been so many 
wonderful momones, so many wonderful 
[Kople. 1 ho\x that I mean as much to those 
[vople as ihey mean to me," said Poison. 

Brian Purcell kis completed his fourth 
sea.son as the head coach of the women's 
scK'cer team, compiling a 37-3 1 -2 record. A 
1987 F^' graduate, Purcell was a lour-year 
lettennan at midliekl for the Blue Hose. 
Purcell earned a master's degree in sports 
management from the Unilc<l States Sports 
Academy in \W). 

Purcell credits much of his success to 
Ralph Poison, a former coach and current 
colleague. F\ircell was named the first head 
coach ol the PC women's program in l'^89 
alter serMng as an assistant coach on the 
men's team for two years. "Most of what I 
know alx)ul s(Kcer, 1 learned directly Imiii 
Poison, " he said. 

"My greatest aL\uinplishiiKni at PC 
has been to oversee the developiiieni of tlie 
women's scKcer team from its beginning to 
the place iliai we are right now," added 
F^urcell, 

F^ircell was honored in IMOOand 1992 
by Ixnng named SAC and NAIA District 26 
Coach of the Ye;ir. 

"Brian F^ircell's patience in watching 
the wtMiien's program develop w iihoui losing 
his intensity plus his loyalty lo F*C have been 
his greatest contribution," said Athletic 
Director (iault. "His sincere interest in his 
players and their performances in the 
classroom, on campus, and in everyday life 
as well as in soccer is also a I'reai ailribiite." 



Baseball team prepares for '93 season 



by Everett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

De.spilc losing six starters from last 
year's team, the 1993 Blue Hose baseball 
team hopes to improvcon 1992's record of 
22-22 and a fourth pl»;c finish in the SAC. 

With only five players with starting 
experience returning this year, many 
positions will be up for grabs. The 
captains- junior Jew Henry Berube and 
seniors Gregg Desto and Julius Prince - 
arc the only definite starters on the team. 
While Berube is making the transition 
from right field last year to catcher this 
year, Dcsio, a middle inficldcr, and Prince, 
accntcrficlder, will remain at their nomial 
positions. 

With the loss of All-SAC pitchers 
Ray Canady and Kris Kirkland, the Blue 
Hose's pitching staff isal so inexperienced. 
Fortunately, seniors Robb Niles and Jay 
Reeves, along with juniors Jim Dudley 
and Darren Bane, will be back for K\ 
Also returning are sophomore Ellon 
Pollack and senior relicverChris Bass, la.st 
year's ERA leader. 

Head Coach Tim Corbin commented 
on his team, saying, "Pitchers who help us 



out this year haven'i had a lot of innings in 
the past. But I believe they're capable." 
Corbin added, "The fre.shmen will be 
pushed into starting roles," 

When asked aboul the confidence he 
has in the team. Coach Corbin siiid, "As 
longaswe'rcimprovingeachwa'k, we've 
got a chance to be in the duck of things, but 
we've got a long way to go." 

Co-caplam dregg Desio, an All- 
Conference selection last year, commented 
on the team, saying, "1 feel we have die 
poienual lo be a very gcMxl te;»m." 

The Blue Hose team will be dedicating 
their season lo Marcus Miller, a player who 
died last semester in a car accident. The 
team is also planning to have Miller's 
lersey retired and a dedication with Miller's 
family in one game later in the season. 
Rial date has not yet been designated. 

Desto commented on Miller, adding, 
"1 dunk pi'ople who knew him want lo play 
beller and harder than K'lore." 

After playing lomorow at Piedmont, 
K' will u-avel lo Newberry and lurnian 
Their first home game is next Friday, 
F-ebruary l9at3:(K). 



Blue Hose tennis looks to new season 

Both teams hope to build on past success 

by Brian Sacco 

STAF-TWKrn:K 

So[ihoim)re I yler Van Leuven, and 

If past success IS any indication heshinen Paul l-artiuluirsoii and 

of future success, neither the I'^'M Jeremy Wood will provule the team 

Blue Hose men's or women's tennis with depth The Blue Hose will be 



teams should Fiave difficulty 
reaching [)ost-season tournanients. 

The men's team will he returning 
five of the top sik singles plasers 
and the number two doubles team 
from last year's iialioiial 
tournament 

Mallory McRae. a l'''^.^* tenuis 
and scholar All American, will 



striving to reach the national 
lournatneni again while lilling 
several vacancies on the squad 

The women's team will be laced 
with a rehuilding year alter losing 
three starters from a team that won 
ihree consecutive conference 
I hampionships The 1 ,id\ Blue 
Hose will he reluming .Senior Miiida 



anchor the top singles position, (iriflin and juniors Dina F'adgeti, 



while juniors Mark Necaisc anti 
.Scott Ambrose will alternate at the 
ncKt two singles positions tor ihe 
lilue Hose. Seniors (lien Austell 
and David Freudenheiin and 
freshman David Kemp will round 
out the singles positions 

McRae and Necaise will he the 
number one doubles team, while 
Ambrose and lieudenheim will play 
number two doubles, Senior Don 
St 1 1 well, J II mo I I '.ml Kool, 



Stephanie Hunt, and JennilerMiller, 
while Ireshmen Jenniler linm, 
Slacie Biiliorit, .iiul Jessica Clark 
will be called u[)on to pla\ 
compeiitively early in the season 
The women would like to leliirn .is 
conference champions .md maint.im 
.1 national ranking. 

Although the team is 
ineKperieiiced. the girls have been 
working hard to aclnevc success," 
s.iul ( 'oac h Donna Arnold 



mm 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



SPORTS 



Women's basketball team wins four games in a row 



by Everett Catts 

SPORTS EDITOR 

After a 73-67 loss to Wofford on 
January 25, the Lady Blue Hose basketball 
team won four straight games, defeating 
Gardner- Webb, Under, Catawba, and Elon. 

On January 30 the Lady Blue Hose 
crushed Gardner-Webb, 79-61, Melanie 
Johnson led all scorers with 24 points, and 
Jennifer Hilliard had 8 rebounds. 

The Women's Team next hosted three 
games, beginning with Lander on February 
I , PC defeated die Lady Senators, 80-65, 
Flilliard led the team with 18 points and 8 
boards. 

Two days later, the L^y Blue Hose 
edged Catawba, 83-81, Johnson's 27 points 
led the team. Hilliard, Chns Miichum, and 
Dee Dee Williams each had 5 rebounds, 

FX,' then was victorious against Elon on 
February 6, winning in overtime, 85-75, 
Johnson was 13 for 24 from the field and 
finished with 30 points and 8 rebounds. 
Hilliard added 8 boards. Miichum and 
Kaye Watts had 14 and 13 points, 
resjx'ctively. 

Dee Dec Williams, a junior who has 
improved over ihe season, had 4 rebt)unds 
in die victory. Against CJardner- Webb, she 
scored 16 points. During that week, 




>^ Drinking and drvgt 
cloud your mind and 
causo risky choicot. 

> Untofo tox can load to 
AIDS. 

> if you'ro prognant your 
baby can got AIDS too. 

> Get holp for a drvg or 
drinking problom. 

>■ if you kavo »ox, u»o 
condoms. Or avoid tak- 
ing tfio risk altogotbor. 




Williams broke a team record by connecting 
on 27 consecutive free throws. The old 
record of 25 straight had stood for ten years. 

Head Coach Beth Couture commented 
on her players' performance, saying, 
'They've (Johnson and Hilliard) been two 
keys for the team. Dec Dee's playing well 
and Chns Miichum is improving with every 
game." Couture added, "Kaye Walls has 
been shooting belter, and everyone has 
stepped up and done a better job for us." 

When asked aboul the play of Johnson 
and Milliard, the team's leading scorers. 
Couture said, "In the past five games Melanie 
and Jennifer have picked up the tempo and 
played a more complete game." 

Wiih the four wins, the Lady Blue Hose 
are 15-6 (7-4 SAC) and have moved up to 
third place in ihe conference, a position with 
which Coach Coulure is happy. Couture 
said, "The third position is very important 
because die top three teams go to ihe disUict 
playoffs, and that is our goal." 

The Women's team lost to Mars Hill 73- 
6^) on February 8 and will host Carson 
Newman tomorrow at 5:45. Their last home 
game of the season is against Converse at 

6:(X)on February 15. 




PC's Jennifer MIms (50) looks to pass the ball to a teammate, photo by Km Gibson 




Hose basketball 
team ranked 1 2th 
in national poll 

by Brian Sacco 

STAFF WRITER 

Success for PC basketball has not been 
easy to come by. Bui as the seaswi has 
progressesed, the Blue Hose have gained 
confidence and experience. They have 
rolled to a 19-2 overall record and a ranking 
of 1 2th in the latest nauonal poll, the highest 
ranking in school history. The Blue Hose 
remained first in the SAC through last 
weekend's games, while improving to 9-1. 

On January 30 the Blue Hose travelled 
to Gardner Webb College in an important 
SAC game. Andrew Wellman led PC to a 
68-58 victory with 20 points, while Bret 
Jones pulled down eight rebounds. 

(>i February 1 the Blue Hose hosted 
Lander College m a non-conference game. 
Wellman led F»C to an 81-61 victory with 16 
points, while Jones contributed eight 
rebounds. 

On February 3 Catawba College visited 
Close Arena, looking for an upset against 
the highly ranked Blue Hose in a SAC game. 
PC did not falter and came away victonous. 
72-61 . Jones led PC with 1 7 points and nine 
rebounds, while Tony Grant also pulled 
down nine rebounds. 

On February 6 K' hosted SAC rival 
Elon Col lege and pre vai led over the Fighting 
Christians, 73-61. Jones led PC with 21 
points, and Grant pulled down 1 rebounds. 



Andrew Wellman (20) defends a Catawka player. phtMo by Km Gibson 



ENTERTAINMENT 



8 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1993 



Suhrestedt duo to perform at PC 



by Camisha Clarke 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

French music. Art Poetry. Each 
element will be combined in the concert 
provided by the piano duet consisting of 
Barbara and Gerhardt Suhrstedt. The 
Suhrstedts' program, part of the Lectures 
and Fine Art Series, includes art slides of 
the French impressionists and poetry of 
Louys and Mallarme' from 1870 to 1920. 
Furthermore, the Suhrstedts will show how 
French painters, musicians, and poets 
inspired and influenced each other during 
one of the most culturally rich periods in 
history, whilecombining their performance 
of French piano duels from Bizet through 
Ravel. 

Barbara Fetnow Suhrstedt is a native 
of Chillicothe, Ohio, and a graduate of the 
Oberlin Conservatory of Music. Gerhardt 
Suhrstedt.orginally from Charleston, South 
Carolina, is a graduate of Furman 
University. The Suhrstedts met and married 
while completing graduate study at Boston 



University's School of the Arts. 

The Gina Bachauer International Rano 
Foundation has called Barbara and Gertiardt 
Suhrstedt "one of the finest piano four- 
handed teams currently touring the nation." 

Since their 1982 New York debut at 
Markin Concert Hall, the couple has 
performed for many concert series, including 
the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in 
Chicago and the Phillips Collection Sunday 
Series in Washmgion. They presented the 
opening concert for the 1992 Gina Bachauer 
International Piano Fesu val in Salt Lake City. 
Their interpretation of the French piano duct 
repertoire has received wide critical acclaim. 

In addition lo their formal concerts, the 
Suhrstedts regularly present lectures on the 
pianoduct medium for high schools, colleges, 
and piano teachers' ass(x;iations. 

This innovative cultural enrichment 
program will be held on Tuesday, February 
23, in Edmunds Hall at 8: 1 .S pm. The concert 
is free and open to the public. 



Broadway Cabaret set for this weekend 



Press Release 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The sights and sounds from several of 
Broadway's top hits will fdl Presbyterian 
College's Belk Auditorium February 1 3 - 
14, when the college's choir presents its 
tenth annual Broadway Cabaret. 

Performances are planned for 8: 1 5 pm 
on February 13 and 3:00 pm on February 
14. Admission is free, although donations 
for the choir's projects will be accepted. 

Included in the production will be 
preformances from Broadway hits such as 
Fiddler on the Roof, Guys and Dolls, 
Oklahonw, Kiss Me Kate, A Chorus Line, 
Damn Yankees, Paint Your Wagon, and West 
Side Story. 

'The material fits together well. We 



have some humor, some action, and some 
sentimental tunes from the Broadway stage," 
said Dr. Charles T. Gains, profes.sor of music , 
who will direct the performance. "Our 
choreographer for the third consecutive year 
is Donna Whilmorc, the ass(x;iate director 
and choreographer at Theau-e on the Green in 
Greenville. Someone with her imagination 
and talent adds a lot to the production." 

Soloists in the production are Natasha 
Casada,Rhett Wilson, Laura Batten, Lawana 
LcRoy, Catherine Hodges,Ellie Smith, Wain 
Wesberry, Bennett Summey, and Jean 
Grecnman. 

Narrating the show will be Aaron Miller, 
while Gains and Davey Mills will provide 
accompaniment on piano and percussion, 
respectively. 



"'RAISING Cain' is One Of the most Cinematically 
Satisfying movies Of the Summer! 

It's Brian D«? Pdlmrt's rpturn to the Hitchcockicjn genre." 

"A BRILLIANT PSYCHO-lHRILLER WITH JUST THE 
RIGHT AMOUNT OF LAUGHS! 

'Raising Cain' is visual magic... A Brian De Palma classic." 

J.HC..I9 SIXTY SICOND PRfVltW 



I 




SUB will be showing the movie Raising Cain tonight at 7:00 in Springs Campus 
Center. The movie stars .lohn Lithgow and Lolita Davidovich. 



Points of Interest 

from the Peer Connectors 

*76 million Americans reported alcoholism in their families accordiirg lo a 

study by the US Depi. of Health and Human Services 

*75% of rape victims were as.saultcd by j>eople that they knew well 

^20% of women questioned at Cornell University claimed thai they have had 

sex forced upon ihem 



Upcoming CEP Events 



February 13 & 14 

Concert - Broadway Cabaret. The Presbyterian College Choir present.s 
its tenth annual program of tunes from Broadway shows. 7:30 BA 

February 15 

Panel Discussion - A faculty panel will discuss "The Traditional Role of 
Sports: The Original Idea Before It Became a Media Obsession." 7:30 

EH 

February 16 

Convocation - John Feinstein, author of "A Season On the Brink" and 

"A Season Inside" and media commentator, will discuss "What the 

Media Have Done To Sports." 11 :00 BA 



February 17 - 19 

Play - A Midsummer Nif^ht's Dream. Celebrating the dedication of the 

new Harper Center for visual and dramatic an, the PC Players present 

this Shakespeare classic in PC's newest theater. 7:30 HC 

February 23 

Concert - Barbara and Gerhardt Shurstedt, piano duetists, present an 
innovative program which features four-hand piano duets from Bizet to 

Ravel. 8: 15 EH 

February 25 

Concert - The PC Music Department will present staged productions by 

Bernstein and Barab. 7:30 EH 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume l.XXXVIl NumlxT ^ 



"dive the people the light, so they may find the way." 

PRFSBYTFRIAN COl.lW.E Clinton. South Carolina 29^25 



Wednesday, February 24. 1993 



SGA presidential candidates tai<e their stands on campus issues 



From StalT Reports 

Eleciioiis lor SGA Executive Council 
are set for tomorrow, with a run-ot sc heduled 
for Friday if needed. This year, three 
candidates arc vying for the office of SCi A 
President. They include Lauren Owings, a 
junior from Easley, Stxiih Carolina; T 
Hagan Thompson, a junior from 
Milledgevillc, Georgia; and Brian 
Wilson, a sophomore from Marietta, 
Georgia. 

In order to give PC students an 
opportunity to see where the candidates 
stand on the issues before placing their 
votes in the ballot bo.x, the Blue Suh kin. 
interviewed all three, asking specilk 
questions. 

Their responses arc as follows. 

Why are you running for Sii.\ 
President? 

Lauren Owings: "! am running for SGA 
F*resitleni because I have an honest interest 
in the concerns ol students, faculty, and 
adminisirauon. 1 am not doing ifiis because 
1 think It will look gcxxi on my resume. 1 
want to give something back to PC, and 1 
feel this IS the best way, I want to be an 
effective insu-umeiii linking siudeiUs and 
faculty and administration." 

Ha^an Thompson: "I think 1 could do a lot 
for the schiK)!. We need a better liason 
between the studentsand the faculty , and the 
president should be more available to the 
students. There are people on campus who 
don't even know who the president is this 
year We really need more of a 



communication link." 

Brian Wilson: "I believe that SGA should 
be a true voice for students. In the past, I 
don't think that SGA has been an effective 



academic deani. I have also served as the 
edjlor-in-chief of the PaC SaC, which is a 
huge responsibility. In this capacity, I have 
managed a budget of over S44,0(X) and have 
had the opportunity to work with all types of 




Lauren Owin^s 



Ha^an Thompson 



Brian Wilson 



^i)fce on campus. It is time for SGA to 
address a number of impxirtant issues that 
concern students. As president, I would 
serve as a liason between the student b(xly 
;uul ilie administraiu)n of the college." 

VNhatqualifiesyou tobeS(J A President? 

Lauren Owings: In the past, 1 have served 
as a meniber ol the Student Affairs 
Committee. I currently serve on the SGA 
Executive Council as the Judicial Council 
chairperson. This role has honed my 
leadership and delegation skills and allowed 
me to work with both the student and 



people. This position has been a tremendous 
learning expenence for me." 

Hagan Thompson: "I am qualified because 
I served on Student Council my fu-si two 
years at PC. I was the freshman class 
president and sophomore representative . I 
am also the president of BACCHUS and of 
the Model UN. 1 am actively involved in 
Westminster Fellowshipand South Carolina 
Student Legislature, and through them I 
have u^ied to improve my communication 
and leadership skills. Through these 
organizations, I can keep up with what's 
going on. I won't be isolated I will see a 



variety of people and will be able to talk to 
them. I will be more m tune with the student 
body." 

Brian Wilson: "First and foremost, I am 
concerned. I believe that I have something 
to offer this college and the student body. 
I have served in various leadership 
positions. Iamaresideniassistant,Ihave 
worke<I in leadership in high school, 1 
have worked with SVS, I have worked 
with PC athletic teams, and 1 am familiar 
with student life and greek life. I feel I am 
the most qualified candidate." 

What do you see as the number one 
problem at PC? 

Lauren Owlngs: "Students at PC tend 
to be apathetic towards what goes on at 
school. To a great degree, I think the 
students feel powerless. It is not that they 
don't care; many just don't understand 
how to make a difference, and this causes 

a great deal of miscommunicauon. Apathy 

can be changed." 

Hagan Thompson: "The number one 
problem at PC is \xk of unity. We're such 
a small college, and we are supposed to be a 
family. 1 see too many cliques, too many 
people being stereotyped. This school is too 
small for that. People come to this school 
thinking we'll all be together. We ought to 
promote more unity." 

Brian Wilson: "I see the number one 
problem at PC being a slack SGA. There arc 
(Story continuted on page 3. ) 



On The Inside 



Page 2 . . . 

SGA: Is there more lo it than 
proim)iing dances and moving 
into a big\)tt"ice? 

Page 3 . . . 

Sample ballot tor tomorrow's 
SCiA elections. 

Page 4 . . . 

PC's production ol A Midsummer 
Niiihl's Ihcdm receives high 
praise. 



Men's basketball team brings home conference title 



by Kveretl (alts 

six)KTS HDITOR 

On Saturday, lebiuary 20, the 
long-awaited rematch between PC 
and Lenoir-Rhyne, co-leaders in the 
South Atlantic Conference with 12- 
1 records, finally came. Afterlosing 
lo ihe Bears in double (ivertinie on 
January 2^, the Blue Hose st>ught 
revenge .md I he SAC- 8 
cliampioiishi|) 

Since that lionie loss. PC has 
won nine m a row Ilie Blue Hose 
have won 1^' out of their last 20 
games 

PC sent three buses ol lans to 
the game with l.enoir-Rhyne. Abi>ut 
SO local fans were in one bus and 
aboiii 100 PC siudents manned the 
two buses rented by fraternities. 
,'\pprox inuitel V S() more fans 



travelled in separate vehicles to the 
game in Hickory, North Carolina 

By halftime. the Blue Hose were 
down by seven points, 32-25. Bret 
Jones led all PC scorers with eight 
points in the first half Midway 
through the second half, the Blue 
Hose were down by 12. 
Nevertheless. PC kept battling and 
tied the score with under two 
minutes left Soon after the score 
was lied, the Blue Hose took the 
lead for good and won by five, 72- 
67. 

Following the game, many PC 
players and fans piled on the center 
of the court in celebration. 

Four of PC's five starters were 
in double figures in scoring. 
I eading all players was Jones, who 



had 24 points. John Lloyd followed 
with 22. Both players scored 16 
points in the second half, Jones had 
two crucial three-pointers. Andrew 
Wellman and Derrick Lovelace each 
had 10. 

The regular season SAC 
Championship guaranteed PC a first 
round bye and a home game in the 
District Playoffs on Saturday, March 
6. 

Before that game, the Blue Hose 
will compete in the SAC 
Tournament, which begins on 
Friday, February 26, and ends on 
February 28. The tournament will 
be hosted by Catawba College. 

Coach Nibert strongly 
encourages PC students to attend 
(Story continued on page 3.) 



EDITORIAL 



WRDNF^SDAY. l-HIikUARY 24, 1993 



V/HDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1993 



NEWS 



SGA needs leaders who are sincere, not full of 'hot air' 



by Jason West 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

One hot, summer day in 1787, after 
adjourning from a session of the Consti- 
tutional Convention in Philadelphia, 
Benjamin Franklin, a delegate to tlie 
Convention, was approached on the 
street by a farmer's wife. The woman 
was concerned about the activities that 
were going on in Independence Hall. 
She asked Mr. Franklin, "What type of 
government arc you creating for us?" 
Franklin replied, "A republic, ma'am, if 
you can keep it." 

Tomorrow is election day for PC 
students. Oh sure, it's not like we arc 
voting for President of the United States 
or for some other high national office, 
but we will be voting for the leadership 
of next year's Student Government As- 
sociation. 

A lot of students probably could 
care less about voting for SGA officers. 
They don't really see what SGA does 
that is rclevant to student life, and they 
don't really understand or carc to un- 
derstand what function SGA serves. In 
fact, many students, including myself at 



times, sec SGA as a big joke, lacking 
rcspcct and dignity. Well, there lies die 
problem. 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion does serve as an important clement 
in the life of Presbyterian College. SGA 
is llie primary liason between ilic students 
and the faculty and administration. It is 
supposed to serve as the voice for all 
students, the method by which our con- 
cerns and complaints arc to be heard. 
Unfortunately, this has not been SGA 's 
role in the past. 

I can't really think of anything earth 
shattering that SGA has done since I 
walked onto the PC campus. Oh sure, 
SGA has been iastrumental in organiz- 
ing FOB activities, Shag-Fcst (which 
was cancelled last year due to lack of 
funding and planning) and moving into 
its nice, new, plush, and big office. There 
is supposed to be more to SGA than 
moving into an office and sponsonng a 
dance. 

Since SGA really doesn't do any- 
thing, it has become a necessary 



aggravavalion. The student body gives 
it no support or legitimacy, yet we are 
required by tlie college to have it. As a 
result, most of us could carc less about 
who runs for SGA offices and about 
voting. This results in less than qualit\ 
px;ople being in charge, and it fX'rjx'tu 
ates the inaction of tlie organization that 
is supposed to be our voice. 

The student body's lack of concern 
creates the "political machines" arul the 
"machine organi/ers" that we have all 
read about and heard discussed re*ccntly. 
It creates a group of semi -honest people 
who arc interested only in promoting 
themselves and their own pcrsoiKil 
agendas. 

Maybe it is time for the students ot 
Presbytenan College to develop an in 
lercst in their SGA. There arc a number 
of candidates mnnmg for lixecuiivc 
Council slots this year who are sincerely 
interested in making a difference. There 
are also a nuniberof candidates whoaa- 
"big talkers," who have no miercst m 
"acting" on all their talk. It isim|X)rtani 



for the student lx)dy to make a distinc- 
tion Ivtwcen someone who will work 
and someone who is lull of hot air. 

In order to improve SGA, we need 
to vote aiul vote for someone who is 
experienced, knowledgeable, has a 
working relationship with the faculty 
and administration, has integrity, and 
will do more than move into an office 
antl sponsor a dance. 

I'resbyienan College has su lie red 
from inojK'rable apathy lor a numlxTof 
years. This year could prove to be a 
miraculous recovery for SGA and the 
PC student body if the nght [X'ople are 
elected. 

Hen Franklin promised the lami 
woman a republic. In reality, he prom- 
ised all ol America a republic but warned 
that it would only last as long as the 
jx'ople were concemed and commuted 
to its survival. It is up to our generation 
to see h) it that the republic ct)ntinues. 
As students, we can start by voting lo- 
monow lor a slate of SCiA candidates 
who will be concemed and committed. 



Letter to the Fditor 



Dear Editor: 



I have only been here at PC for a semester. However, in this short time I have failed 
to receive three letters that were mailed to me. I live in Spartanburg, and usually the mail 
takes one day to get here. Many of my friends have mentioned having the same problems 
with their mail. 

I have been to boarding schools and never had this problem. My parents do not have 
this problem at their home address. Therefore, the problem lies in the Springs Mail R(X)m. 

The response from the 'Tnendly" mail room workers when I ask is, "I can'ido anything 
about it." So, what is the college saying? Arc we to make sure we get our parents to pay 
the extra fee to have mail certified? That is absurd. I have no solution, and that is not my 
job. It is the responsibility of the college to see that llie students racive iheir mail. 

Sincerely, 

Michael Thomas Myers 



Any student wishing to place a letter to 
the editor in the Blue Stocking must 
submit a signed letter no later than one 
week pnor to publication. The deadline 
to have a letter m the next issue is 
Friday, March 19. 




The Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Clinton, South Carolina, 2932.5 
Volume LXXXVII, Numbers 
February 24. 1993 



Editor in Chief Ja.son Wesi 

Managing Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

SporLs Editor Evcrettc CaiLs 

Entenainment Editor Cainisha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather Monaief 

Photography Editor Kim Gibson 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



Advertising Editor Ann Maylield 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Mixcm 

ArUst Michael Christcnsen 

Photography Slaff 
Kimberlee Gibson Todd U)ve 



Staff Writers 
Elizabeth Cunard 
IxMgh Heamburg 
Krislina Pruilt 
Paula Wanen 
Brian Sacco 
Kirn Rabon 
Tobin Turner 



Amanda Bowers 
Kalherinc Bonner 
Cher Fulbrighl 
Michelle Canlcy 
Shelly Phipps 
Jamcy Pate 
Tonya Snead 



The Blue Slocking is a tri weekly sludeni putiji 
cation ofPresbytcnanCollcgc. The pajxT serves 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional and 
national concern, for advertising, conlaci I he 
BlueSliKkinji. Presbyterian College, Box jO^il, 
Clinton, SC 2932.S. The Blue SunhriK v^.l 
comes letters H) the editor from all memk-rs of 
the PC community. Signatures are reijuircd. 
lu^llers are printed on a space available basis 
The Blue StocktnK reserves the right to edit all 
letters for proper grammar and punctuation. 
The final deadline for suNiiitting leuers is Fri 
day at 12:(Klpin(in ilu- y..>.l '>"•'■•' -Miihlicatiun 




PC 



-TT I* ^tl 



« J 



I idbirs 



S(]\ Sample Ballot 

Elections for SGA E 
Council are duled tor 

totnorrow, F ' v 25. A 
will be heki *■ ' ■ • 
26. ifnecessnr ■w 

in Spi ig at 11:(X) 

!itil6:(K)i) :e 

CMCi' ' ■ 

■1,.^ ...... .... J 

t-:ni(iidaies fi>: sccutive 

.cil slot. 

SG^ . .vsidcnt 

auren Owing.s (Junior) 

iiagaa iiKHiip.soii i^juuKUj 
.irian Wilson (Soph.) 

SGA Vice President 

Tvler Van Ixuven (Soph.) 
.ViaiKiiuiil (Soph) 

Judicial Chairman 

Leslie Chambers (Junior) 
Bill Wnght (Soph.) 
Marie Youmans (Soph.) 

SGA Secretary 

Natasha Casada (Soph.) 
Jason Wmfield (Junior) 

S(;A Ireasurer 

John Dunn (iTcshman) 
I)al]asCVlson(Soph.) 

SI H President 

Warren Sloan (Junior) 



Applications lor class otliccrs 
are due on lYiday, I-ebruary 26. 
Speeches will Ix* made on March 1 , 
at 7:(K) pm in Springs Campus 
Center. Idections for class officers 
are set for Tuesday. March 2, with 
a run off schi'dtiifd for March 3, if 
necessary. 



i.Mj.\ ektiion initrviews continued from 
pagel) 

inifxirlant i .(jA thai arc not being 

addressed. It is ume to address these i.ssues." 

Uo" imi HI \ iMMMiii a iiiore iK'tive 
orcani/ation on campus? 

Lauren Owinss: "SGA needs to be more 

' " '■.'until needs to work together, 

,uu)thcr. There needs to be 

' i.A, and unity can be found 

job requirement of 

as a iiason between students and 

.niMiuiistration needs to be followed more 

efficiently. This could be done by making 

SGA more visible and more open to the 

students." 

Hagan Thompson: "Eiach SGA member 
must make a firm commimicni to themselves 
and to the student body. We arc elected to 
represent a class or the whole student body. 
We have consiiiuenLs and need to ask their 
opinions." 

Brian Wilson: "SGA should have a greater 
resp()nsibilily than what it currently has. 
What has SGA done this year? The only 
thing 1 can remember SGA doing this year is 
helping to achieve outdtx)r graduation. There 
is more to be done. Change is needed." 

What specil'ic goals would you like to set 
for S(iA next year? 

Lauren Owings: "I projx)se that weekly 



meetings be held between the SGA President 
and the officers of the college to allow for 
more discussion and to address the concerns 
facing the students. I also would propose 
that once a month, SGA hold a 'Town 
Meeting," which would be completely open 
to all students so that they could voice their 
concerns and receive direct an.swers to their 
questions. I would encourage more student 
forums, and I would encourage more faculty 
and admimsirauon to attend SGA mecungs 
so that they could gain a better understanding 
of what the students are saying and thinking. 
Above all, it is important for SGA to gam a 
status of respect and legitimacy." 

Hagan Thompson: "I'd like for SGA 
members to be better communicators. They 
need to be more active on campus and more 
inclusive. We ought to look more towards 
the concerns of MSU. Their concerns get 
pushed back sometimes. Wc nwd to act on 
all siudcnt concerns, not just the concems of 
a few. We also need to be better liasons 
between the administration and the students. 
Too often I hear the attitude that it's 'us 
against them.' The administration is there to 
help us. We're both trying to do what's be.st 
for the sch(H)l." 

Brian Wilson: "PC needs a 24-hour study 
area on campus. SGA need.s an open door 
policy , and it needs to be a listening voice for 
students. I think we need to check into the 
Safe Ride Shuule being manned by SGA, 
and I believe that we need to look into what 
the college is doing with its endowment 



fund. How could that money better benefit 
students?" 

Recently, there has been considerable 
controversy concerning the establishment 
or a political machine at PC. What are 
your thoughts? 

Lauren Owings: "I think there is a lot of 
truth to the rumors of a political machine 
being created at PC. I believe that someone 
thought of the idea, liked the idea, and 
thought that the student body would be too 
apathetic to notice. The idea of a machine 
defeats the whole purpose of SGA. It is not 
the job of SGA to secure power and presuge 
for a select few. U is SGA's responsibility to 
empower all students." 

Hagan Thompson: "When I read the article, 
I thought It was a joke. I didn't think the 
person was senous. But when I really thought 
about it, I realized it was a major conem. If 
enough people were involved, a machine 
could be very detrimental. We need to have 
the best people m the SGA positions. I'm 
really glad Landon spoke up. It made me 
stop and think that it could really go on." 

Brian Wilson: 'I have heard many rumors 
concerning a political machine on campus, 
and tho.se rumOTS probably started with some 
uuth. I am running for SGA president 
bcxause I am the best candidate for the job, 
not because I am a member of a certain 
social organization." 



(Basketball story continued from page 11 

the playoff games, especially the Districts. The Blue 
Hose opponent for the Districts has not yet been 
dctemimed. In the SAC Tournament, PC will be the 
number one seed and will most likely play Catawba. 

Niberi comniented on the support of the PC fans, both 
home and away, saying, "That type of atmosphere is 
exciting; to look up and play m front of your own peers 
IS great, and it helps us play harder." 

Co-captain Bret Jones comniented on the season, 
saying, "More or less it's a relief to know wc did it. being 

puked in the preseason to win the conference " 



Recyclables banned by city 

by Heather Monirief 

HNVIRONMHNTHDiroK 

Recycling effous on the F*C campus have been limited due to a 
decision made by city officials this past week Newspapers and 
plastics will no longer be accepted by the city's recycling collection 
sue. Since Recycle K' channels Us recyclables through the city site, 
ihey will no longer be able to collect these items on campus 

OlTicials s;iid that moans for accepting plasucs may be devcio[X"d 
in the future, but nowspafXTs will most likely luM be accepted by the 
site again. The inability to rtxyde new.spapcrs will affect the K" 
campus the most since the library and the student mailrtxnn generate 
large quantities ol pafvrs weekly. "We rake several U'uckloails of 
news|Ta|X'rs alone to the city site each monih, " said Tixld Love, 
Recycle IX" pick up coordinator. "1 hate to see all of those papers 
thrown away'" 

Recycle IX' will coniinue to accept cardboard, aluminum cans, and 
glass and will a'stan accept;mce of computer pa|X'r Offices which 
generate waste computer pajx'r should coniaci lleatfier Moncricf at 
KW95 1 5, so that a means of recycling It can be established. Rayclc 
PC pick ups will be on Monday altemix)ns for the remainder of the 
spring semester. 




PC .Senior Bret .lones (right) led the Blue Hose with 24 
points in the team's battle with Lenoir-Rhyne for (he 
SAC-8 Champion.ship. photo by Kim Gibson 



'Til' do afCfquds of nails!' 
$5 oft of new nails. 

FADAS 

Wash, cut, and blow dry: 

Guys: $7 Girls: $12 

Copeland Plaza 833-5446 



ENTERTAINMENT 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1993 



Harper Center exhibit featu res famous American artists 



by Jennifer Rhodes 

STAFF WRITER 

If you were to tell a Presbyterian 
College student that Andy Warhol 
and Grandma Moses are sitting 
together on the Presbyterian 
College campus, you may receive a 
look of dismay or perhaps an 
expression of amazement. Many 
students are not aware of the sixty 
American paintings being shown 
in the new Harper Center. 

One of the most culturally 
enriching shows ever held on the 
campus includes various paintings 
taken from different eras in 
American art history. Mi)st of the 
works are small masterpieces the 
artists painted between their larger 
projects. 

According to Associate 
Professor of Art Dr. Bob Hild, 
"Populists arc familiar with the 
Baseball Hall of Fame or the 
Football Hall of Fame. Now 
Presbyterian College has the Butler 
Institute of American Art Hall of 
Fame." 

Many of the works in the Harper 



Center are self-portraits, as 
American artists had conformed to 
introspection. But not all the works 
are studies of the individual. 
Thcodoros Stamos and Joan Mit/hcll 
painted a picture of their worlds 
through abstractions. In his work 
"Durham Connecticut," George 
Inness shows the influence of French 
Impression yet encompasses his own 
individuality. Berninghaus brings 
the Old West back to life with his 
paintings of American Indians. In 
"Ship Oglethorpe" Samuel Walters 
brings the marine life from 18.i2 back 
to life. 

The sixty paintings display a slice 
of American History and the 
influence of our culture on Art. From 
the early ISOO's until the iwetuicth 
century, the paintings include 
realism, surrealism, abstraction and 
Andy Warhol's Pop Art. 

The show will be on display at 
the Harper Center until March H. 
Gallery hours are Tuesday through 
Sunday from 2:00 to 5:00 pm. 




PC students Lejeanna Maddox and Dean Sheorn discuss the (irandma Moses 
painting in the art gallery of the Harper Center. Photo by Kim Gibson 



PC production of A Midsummer Night's Dream deemed a 'huge success' 



by Kim Rabon 
STAFF WRITER 

The Presbyterian College Theater 
Company created a magical and dramatic 
grand opening for the Harper Center with 
their performance of William Shakespeare's 
A Midsummer Night's Dream. The cast and 
crew presented a brilliant visual 
interpretation of the play before six sell-out 
audiences. 

The technical and production crew and 
members of the theater production lab 
should be among the most highly 



commended for the outstanding pcrfomiancc. 
The theater was transfonned into an enchanted 
forest with props consi.stmg of a plexiglass 
stage, enormous columns, and an abundance 
of greenery. 

The lighting crew enhanced the .setting 
and created and maintained the specific mixxls 
of the play. The pr(xluction crew al.so did a 
great job with costumes, which went along 
well with the .setting and with the characters' 
parts. Without the hard work of the technical 
and production crew, the play would not 



have bwn nearly the success it was. 

The play , directed by Dr. Dale 0, Rains 
and designed by Leslie F'resion, was nothing 
less than wonderful. 'I'he combination of the 
personalities of the characters and actors 
made the presentation of the play realistic. 
While iho entire cast did a magnilicent 
job, the play did have its stand-outs. Both 
Aaron Miller (Theseus/Oberon) and Karen 
Witienbr(K)k (HippolyUi/Titania) are to be 
commended lor their (K'riorniances of their 
dual -roles. 



Two other character standouts were 
Chnstopher Nichols and Stxicio Richardson, 
Nichols, who |X)rtraycd Boiioiii, was the 
primary source of humor m the play 
Richardson, who ivrlormed the role of 
Helena as her debut III the theater, alsodid an 
excellent job in ex[)ressing the emotions ol 
her character. 

TlK'pnxhKUonoi A Muisumnwr Nti;ht' s 
Dream was a huge success. The direction, 
cast, and crew made the end prwluct a joy to 
watch. 



THE SQUARE ROOT OF WONDERFUL 

by Camisha Clarke 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

Each moBtb the Presh^rian College 
Malhcmaiicl pepprtment presents a new 
mathcmalici^ Cbal ienge to anyq^ who dares 
to test his or b^r ^kilb and kno#|»lgc. The 
challenge fc^||bruafy is to sho\v^ analysis 
and a n|inimil iBugumt of case chc^ng, that 
there tt only fMK solution to the wJowing 
cryi)t«gfaBJ.aiid lind ii: 



"^WONOFRHI ^ ()()DI>|F 

All enuii** tih' mid Ix suhmuied by Feb- 
ruary 28 , and a pn/jc is a wiirdcd to the pcrson(s) 
with the correct aiMwer. Please place all 
enu-ies inside the white icosahedron (located 
between office nqinbcx 220 and IM)) on the 
second floor of Jacobs Hilll I'he^'inncrand 
solution will be annoirnced \n th( next issue 

ofllicBiucSiwkinK 




[ TAKirn IIS COUPON 

I ANDGHrAFRHF. 

I DESSERT WITH YOUR MliALAI'.. 

I 

I 

I 

L 




KxpircsS 19 93 



I'he Episcopal Church Especially Welcomes Students 
+ ALL SAINTS' EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

One Block SoHh of GreetwiUe Diiiiixg Hall 



830 am Holy hurhdrist 

9 45 am ( Yiristun l'.(iui.4tKin 

10 M\ am (-n<Tr«- (m Panith HaU) 

1100 am Holy Eucharist 
Muaik) E^cuiiics 

♦ 9.00 pm (ANIIRHURY 

(at Crossroads) — ttoly Eucharist 



Wrlidiiif l<i 
CAMFRBI H\ 

thr f '{KM <ipal ntmlrnl |CT(iiip 
<w ( ampui 




Naed nomeont to talk to? 



IV Rev Nan<-y J Alliwm, Rrrtnr {f^^^ 1 «») 

IV Rev l^nnul ItartMut, I'rifji^m C»n/ms {«^^ (IW,M 



THE BLUE 



^^ii^v. 




STOCKING 



m^jy 



VoliiMicl.XXXVII Numtvr'* 



"(live the people the li^hl, so they ma\ Jindthe way." 

'KtSHVTKkl \\ col 1.1 (,F. Clinlon.Soulh Carolina 29325 



FrRlav,Man.h26, 1W3 




Dr. David (iillespie teaches such diverse t(»pics as American political parties, ( onstitutional law. and Kast Asian politics. 

phi>l(> by Todd Love 

Gillespie garners honor as top PC professor 



b\ I.e.Jeanna Maddox 

MANAC.INC. [ DITOK 

In keeping uiiti its iraililion ol 
recognizing ami honoring oiitstancling 
cledication among iLs latulty, Presbyierian 
College has selected Dr Dave Gillespie as 
the IW^ Professor of the Year. Gillespie, 
professor of {■K)liiical science, has served as 
a member of the PC faculty since P)7i). 

Nominations for the professor of the 
year are nuule by academic depariinenLsaiul 



On The Inside 



Page 2 . . . 

The City of Clinton explains its 
cancellation of recyclanlcs at its 
recycling center. 

Page 3 . . . 

Snowed in! PC students share 
theirexpehences in the Bli//ard 
of 1 W. 

Page 4 . . . 

Women in Leadershipon (he PC 
campus. 



by Signui Kappa Alpha. ?C\ honor s(Kieiy. 
The final decision is made by a committee 
C()mposed ol three taciilty memtx-rs, two 
studenLs, an alumnus, and an acfhiinisirator 

According to Dean William Moncrief, 
selection is based on such criteria as 
"extraordinary effort as a scholar and 
teacher," "service to the institution and 
pri)fession." and "balance of achievement m 
teaching, scholarship, and service 

Dr HiH>ker Ingram, ass(xiaie[Motessor 
o\ poliiKal SI. lenvi' can attest to his 



colleague's qualification in these areas. 

"Dave Gillespie is a caring person who 
displays character and iniegnty in a way that 
obviously retlccLs his commitment to the 
real essence of Christian values. He 
constiintly shows concern for the welfare of 
his colleagues and students." s;nd Ingram. 

(i illespie has been integral in the pr(x:ess 
ofesiablishing and sirengihemng the Political 
.Science departjnent at PC. W'hen he arrived 
at PC in \^1^, Political Science was a wing 
of the Historv department. 



Ingram adds, "It was in large part due to 
Dr. Gillespie's initiative, drive, and foresight 
that t(xiay we can boast of a three -person 
Political Science department with a Political 
Science major that is one of the most popular 
and respected on campus." 

.Another criterion for selection is 
"evidence of impact and involvement with 
siudenLs,"anditisinthisarenathatGillespie's 
students give him the highest praise. 

"Dr. Gillespie isonc of those professors 
you'll always remember, not only because 
of his interesting stones but also because of 
his unique ability to inspire people," said 
Senior Kaihryn Spearman. "Hisenihusiasm 
for both leaching and politics has mfiuenced 
counUess students. " 

His students especially note Gillepie's 
inclusiveness and unbia.sed teaching style. 
"He gives everyone's views the same 
attention, and he dcKsn't force anything on 
you. He lets you learn in an atmosphere in 
w hich you can develop your own opinions," 
said Senior Michael Bradshaw. 

Senior Bill Graves adds, "Dr. Gillespie 
IS diplomatic in how he listens to others' 
views. He isalso unique in that he possesses 
the quality ofbeing able to create discussion 
in class." 

Gillespie's most recent and most 
significant achievement is the completion 
of his book, Poluics at the Periphery . Third 
Parlies in Two Pariy America, it is currently 
being published by the University of South 
Carolina Press and includes a history of 
third parties and their candidates through 
Ross Perot's 1^92 bid for the White House. 

As part of his honor as Professor of the 
Year, Gillespie will deliver the 1^93 
commencement address. 



Cost of attending Presbyterian increases to $15,400 



b\ I obin lurner 
.STAFF WRITI-R 

Duiing Its annual spring 
meeting, the Presbyterian College 
Hoard of Trustees approveil an 
operating budget ami lee schedule 
for the U>^' ^-^M academic year, 

A full-time boarding student can 
expect to pav S1.'S.4()() lor next year 
.1 (> '' [HMceni increase troni last 
year ($I4,3'M). Fuition will cost an 
.uklitional $S7(). while room and 
ho.ird will increase by Si 36 

.According lo administrative 
officials, the estia $1006 will be 
used for increases m staff salary 
( 3S..S percent), student financial aid 
(.^S percent), stall health care and 
heneliis ( 1 (> percent t, ami debt 
Miviceil."' S percent) In addition. 



t>M percent of the new money will 
be reserved for miscellanet)us use. 

PC F'resident Kenneth B, Orr 
siresscct the importance of 
(.omparing P( s ^osi to those of 
other cjuality liberal arts colleges, 
"in a survey of 1 .S liberal arts 
colleges within the Southeast, 
including Furman, Wofford. and 
l)avidst>n. PC IS SM: ^^ below 
average total cost," said Orr 

Orr ilid forsee some good news 
concerning higher educatuin costs 
in the years to come "Over the last 
IS years, the average increase in 
cost has been ') 14 percent I believe 
that lor the *M)s. the avergage 
increase should be in the .*^ to 6 
peiceni range." he said 

Regardless ol the statistics and 



comparisons. PC students still regret 
the increase 

"I am glad that PC is below the 
average, but I wish the average were 
lower," said .Alicia Perry, a 
sophomore from Chattanooga, 
Tennessee. 

"With the changes in the Tuition 
Grant Program next year, it is 
another slap m the face for PC to 
raise tuition," added Laura Hilton, a 
junior from C(»lumbia. South 
Carolina 

According to the budget 
analysis, student Ices will cover 77.8 
percent of next year's $21.1 million 
i)perating budget The other income 
will ctnnc from endowments, gifts, 
interest, and campus sales. 



EDITORIAL 



FRIDAY, MARCH 26. 1W3 



Presbyterian College must remain a small, liberal arts school 



by Jason West 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

It has been nearly four years since I first 
set fool on the Presbyterian College cam- 
pus. I remember that I was a junior in high 
school and was visiting PC because my 
parents had told me to start seriously look- 
ing for the place where I would spend my 
college years. Since I was only 16 years old, 
I had no idea what to look for in a college, 
what I wanted in a college, or what 1 wanted 
to major in. I still believed that my high 
school days would never end. 

However, all that changed as soon as I 
walked around the front plaza and saw this 
beautiful campus and experienced the 
friendly, Southern atmosphere. I knew in a 
moment that Presbyterian College was the 
place for me and that there was no point in 
looking at any more schools. I had found my 



home. 

I was attracted to PC because I could 
sense that this was an institution that had 
been built on a foundation of su-cngth: a 
foundation which includes moral principles 
and a positive environment that encourages 
spintual growth, a wide range of challeng- 
ing academic work, a respect for the past, 
and the ability to look forward in order to 
always ensure success. 

Recently, the college celebrated the 
successful completion of the Building From 
Suength Campaign. One of the original 
goals of this campaign was a promise that 
Presbyterian would rcmai n a small , residen- 
tial college with a stable enrollment be- 
tween 1 100 and 1200. In addition, a goal 
was set that the .student-to- faculty ratio would 
be maintained at no more than 1 5 to 1 . 

After the last meeting of the Board of 



Trustees, it apjKars that these goals arc in 
jeopardy. 

PC's most impressive charactcnslic is 
its small si/e. PC is a comnuiniiy of imli- 
viduals, each with his or her own character. 
This is not a college where a student be- 
comes a number among many. PC is a 
college that has mastered the concept of the 
individual. It is an insiiiuiion that promotes 
a unique one-on-onc leammg environment. 
I know for a fact that many of our state's 
large universities discourage students from 
asking questions m class. The classr(X)m 
size at many of these universities is so large 
that questions just can't be tolerated. 

We don't have that problem at PC, and 
we never should. Here, questions are en- 
couraged becau.se they are an importiint pari 
of the learning process. Here ai F*C^ ihe 
small size allows for personal mieraciion 



between (acuity and students. Thai jx'rsonal 
inlcraclion allows K' not only to teach 
academics but also to leach the lessons of 
life: compassion, honor, micgrity, and 
friendship. 

Where else can you have your history 
professor leach you not only alx)ul the Ro- 
man Empire and World War I, but al.so Uike 
the lime lo leach ihe liner points of ballr(X)m 
dancing' Where else can you go lo have 
your English professor take lime to lell you 
his latest "knwk knock" joke in addition lo 
discussing ihe writings of Robert Frost? 

One of PC's u-ademarks is its "open- 
ness" between faculty and siudenLs, and the 
college communiiy niusi ensure thai ihe 
'openness" which exists here never fades 
and gives way to im[x:rsonaliiy. 

Presbyterian College is not a large 
sch(H)l, and ii never should he. 



Letter to the Kditor 



Dear Editor: 



To set the record straight, the City of 
Clinton was in the forefront of the recycling 
efforts in Laurens County. Both the cities of 
Clinton and Laurens began their recycling 
efforts in the 1990, well in advance of the 
1990 passage of the South Carolina Solid 
Waste Management Act, which mandates 
recycling. Clinton opened ihe county's first 
recycling center, and l>aurens began the 
operation of a limited curbside recycling 
plan. 

The recycling center established by the 
City was begun wiih $6000 "seed" money 
by the City Council; money that the city 
knew would not be recouped. The City 
further placed a fulltime South Carolina 
Department of Corrections uustee at the site 
at an annual co.st to the city of over $1500. 
The City has yet to make enough on its 
rccyclableslocover the cost but iscommitted 
lo still do its pan in raycling. 

The site is l(x;aled at the comer of West 
Cennlenial and Gary Su-eets. With the aid of 
the Clinum Uptown Development As.swia- 
tion and First Presbyterian Church, a theme 
contest was held, and a Clinton High class 
won the contest with the theme "Recycle 
Now, You May Neal II Later." The said 



Ihe Blue Stocking of Presbyterian College 
Ciinion. South Carolina, 2932.5 
Volume LXXXVII. Number 9 
March 26. 1993 



Editor m Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor LeJeanna Maddox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichael 

Sports Editor Everette CatLs 

Entertainment Editor Canusha Clarke 

Features Editor Martha Lynn Smith 

Environment Editor Heather MoncTief 

Photography Editor Kim fiibson 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



theme is on a banner at the recycling center. 
A special thanks should go lo First Presby- 
terian Church, which was the catalyst for the 
opening of die City's recycling center. 

The City at first secured individual 
markets for a number of recyclables; that IS, 
glass, aluminum, cardboard, newspaper, 
office paper, magazines, and plastic. In fact, 
the City actually had lo pay rent on trailers 
for the collecuon of the paper products; rem 
dial was in excess of what the City was being 
paid for the paper. The City lost its original 
paper buyer and found another in late 1 990; 
but had to resu^icl its paper collection to 
newspaper and cardboard to accomcxlale 
the new buyer. Again, rent of die collection 
trailer ate up any "profits." 

In 1991 , K & W Recycling of Laurens 
Couniy approached the City and a deal was 
suuck for K & W to act as the "middle man" 
for our recycling center. K&W was able lo 
.service cardboard, newspaper, plastic, 
alumnium and glass from the City's center. 
This arrangmeni continued until jusi racni 
months, when K&W informed the City that 
It could not proliuihly continue lo lake our 
newspaper orplasiic; the newspaper because 
the bottom had fallen out the market for it 



Advertising Editor Ann Mayficid 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Mixon 

Artist Michael Chrisiensen 

Photography Stajf 
Kimberlee Gibson Todd l>t)ve 



Staff Writers 
Elizabeth Cuiiard 
l^eigh Hearnburg 
Kristina Pruill 
Paula Warren 
Brian Sacco 
Kim Rabcm 
Tobin Turner 



Amanda Bowers 
Kathenne Bonner 
Cher Fulbrighl 
Michelle Caiilcy 
Shelly Fhipps 
Jamey Pate 
Tonya SncatI 



and the plastic because we did not generate 
enough volume. Therefore, the City was 
forced lo disconiine collecting these 
recyclables for die time being. However, wo 
did add the collection of computer paper, as 
K&W does have a market for this. 

The Cily of Clinton did noi "ban" 
reeyclables, but simply had to discontinue 
the colleeuon of newspaper and plasucs lor 
the time being due to market conditions; 
conditions dial the City cannot coiiuol. The 
recyclables' market for certain products is 
very volatile, but the City hasalways.strived 
to overcome market problems. 

The City never had any intention of 
never again taking newspa[x'r at itsrccycling 
center. In fact, wiOi K & W's help, hol|) 
grcady appreciated, a market lor newspa|X'r 
has been found in (ireenville; granted, a 
market that will niii pay for delivered news- 
paper and will notU^ans[X)n it. I lowevcr, the 
Cily IS working with theCily of Laurens and 
Uurens County lo arrange some cost- sharing 
lo gel the newspafx-r to this m;ukcl in 
Greenville. Hoix-lully, this will be worked 
out in Ihe next month or iwo. 

The plastic is another story and will 
require a baling machine lo be purchased 



Ihe lilueSloikin^ in a in weekly sUulonl publi 

cation of Presbylerian College The paixTsenes 
as a forum of news and opinion of regional and 
national concern. For adverlising, contact Ihe 
Blue Storking, Presbylerimi College, Box lOfil , 
Clintnn, SC 2932.V Ihe lUue Stocking wel 
comes letters to the editor from all members of 
Ihe PC community. Signatures are required 
L-llers iire jjrinled on a space av.iiUible basis. 
Ihe Blue Stinking reserves the right to edii all 
letters for ]Tt()\)ci grammar and punctuation 
The final deadline for suNniiling letters is In 
dayal 12 (H)pmon the week before publication 



and a couniywide effort to pnxluce enough 
volume to make ihe purchase ol die baler 
viable. The two ciUes and the county are 
also working on diis option in order lo have 
a baler in place ihis summer, not only for 
plastic, but also lor cardboard. 

The City of Clinton is commiiied lo 
resolving its solid waste problems. The City 
has agreed lo work with die Couniy in al- 
lowing Its old landlill to be used for a 
comjx)siingoixration when the Couniy runs 
out of space at its landlill. Also, die City 
began purchasing recycled products for its 
use (i.colfice supplies) in itsoperations. In 
fail, some years back, the City purchased 
garbarge carts manutacturcd with recycled 
automobile tires; but, the carts were ill- 
received by homeowners because of die 
carts' ct)lor; but, die City at leasi explored 
this innovative avenue. 

Lastly. 1 am glad lo have die opix)rtu- 
niiy lo present ihe vsluile correct story as 
slated above; an exemplary siory of the City 
in ihe area of recycling. 

Sincerely 

Steven L. Harrcll.Ciiy Manager 

City of Clmion, SC 




FRIDAY, MARCH 26. 1^)9.^ 



FEATURES 



SNOWED IN 



PC students remember a strange weekend of wintry weather 



by Martha Lynn Smith 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Someumes Modier Nature works in 
mysterious ways. On Wednesday the 
majority of PC students were lying out in die 
sun, but on Saturday, in the middle of 
SPRING BREAK, a strange dung hapivned. 

The Storm of ihe Century.' Well, at 
least dial is what the news said. But for diose 
students who were not literally snowbinind, 
gelling back for classes became a historical- 
or radier, hysterical- event. 

Some students were simply stuck. 
Iniersiaies were impassable from Ailania, 
Chaluin(K)ga, Knoxville, Bimungham and 
odier areas up North. Mrs. Ann Martin in 
die Academic Affairs office signed "at least" 
two hundred excuses thai listed being 
"snowbound" or trapjxHl in "The Stonn of 
the Century" or "Ihe Bliz/ard of IWV as 
the reason for die absence. She said that one 
student missed an enure week of classes. 

We're not used to snow in Dixie, but ii 
sure can make for a gixxl story. 

t * * * 

The Choir was in Nashville from Friday 
loTuesdiy.and they weren't singing, either. 
Actually, only two lo three inches of snow 
lell in Nashville, but die inUMSiates to take 
them back to school were blocked. 
According to choirmeinber Catherine 
Hodges, the choir kept themselves 
entertained. She credited their bus ilnver, 
Joe, for driving them all amund die city so 
that diey could see bands, shop, see movies, 
and play basketball at lixal churches. "Facu 
though we found lots of fun stuff to do 
togedier," she said, "we were all very reatly 
to gel out of Tennessee on Tuesday." 



m * * * 



The group that w ent to Honduras for die 
Third World Seminar found that diey had to 
do some maneuvering in order U) gel back 
for classes. Iheir llighi to Charlollc had 
been cancelled, and the students, along with 
Chaplain Greg Henley and Sociology 
Professor Charles McKelvey, were stuck in 
the Miami airport. While Henley and 
McKelvey worked to find a way home, 
some students found innovative ways lo 
bide their ume. Lisa Arcnds and Jennifer 
Cam "lifted their spirits" by having a hotel 
shuttle lake them to different hotel 
"restaurants," and Alice Leach got an airport 
porter to push her around in a wheelchair. 
Henley and McKelvey solved the 
problem by renting a car and a van lo drive 
back to sch(x)l. Unforlunalcly, diere was 
one problem : the vehicles had to be relumed 
at die Florida border. Luckily, I>an Nixon 
saved die day and met die group halfway to 
lake ihem all back lo K' in sch(X)l vehicles. 
Dum Vivimus Scrvimus. 



» * * * 



PC Freshman Michael Myers' su>ry 
may top diem all. 

Myers was visiting friends in Fort 
Lauderdale. Florida, when he found out on 
SuiuLiy dial die snow fall was going locancel 
his Amu-ak tram back to Columbia. He 
quickly grabK\l an available seilt on a Ilighi 
lo Columbia through Charlotte so that he 
could gel bac k to K' for classes. However, 
his plane was lateioCh;irlolie,andhc missed 
his connecting Ilighi to Columbia. 

While geiung off die plane, Mycrsstruck 




'^ ^fj^ .r\lku>tS^ 




Z 



:> 



up a conversation with a woman and her 
husband. "I was reading John Gnsham's 
novel. The Firm , and she was reading his 
new btxik. I mentioned that 1 really should 
be reading Oedipus ihc King for Dr. 
Skinner's English class." The woman's 
husband looked at me and asked, "Dr. 
Skinner from Presbyteruin College?" When 
Myers told him dial, yes, they were talking 
about the same profes.sor, die man, a Dr. J im 
Johnston from Columbia, offered him a ride 
back to Columbia so thai he could make Dr. 
Skinner's class the next morning 

Myers drove loClinton from Columbia, 
stayed up until three in die morning reading 
CX'dipus die King , but dien woke up late for 
Dr. Skinner's class. He ran across campus 



to Neville Hall, only to find out dial Dr. 
Skinner was stranded in Adanta. 



* * * * 



About ten years ago, a similar 
snowstorm occurred. But that time cla.sses 
were cancelled, much to die chagrin of many 
of the PC faculty. This year, PC President 
Dr. Kennedi Orr and Treasurer Skip Zubrod 
made the decision not to cancel classes 
because diey had no real way to determine 
the situation in other areas. However, 
excuses were readily and understandably 
given for those students who found traveling 
unsafe. But, m die Presbyterian spirit of 
Calvin, life goes on. 



Sensible Sexuality Week to focus on sexual issues and ethics 



by Martha Lynn Smith 

FEAIIIKIS I-DIIOR 

Seasible Sexu;iliiy VVeek (March 3> 
April S) IS an effort sixmsored by ihe K" 
Peer Coniiecti>rs to heighten aw;irencss ot 
sexual issues lacing college stiuk-nis u\l\\ 
through ojxn discussion and inhuinaiioii 
Ihe events lor the week are as follow s 
♦On luesday. March M),al 1 l.(K)a.ni 
in Wyall ('h.i|xl, Dr John J Carey vsill 
speak on'The Church ol YesteixUiv and the 
ChiiKh ol lomoiTow " Dr. Caiey is a 
Religu)n Professor at Agnes Sc»>ll Ctillcge 
Heisiliechairnianolas|veialcommiiucoii 
human scMialitv , v^ huh provided a ie|x« I to 



the General Assembly ol the Presbyierian 
Church. 

♦Later on Tuesday at 7 U) pin , Dr 
Carev will offer another address iiiled 
•Justice Love; What Is It' What IXxs It 
Mean for College Sliidenis'" rhisialk,also 
mlilmuiuls Hall, IS lor CFP credit 

•On Wednesd.iv, March M. at 4 M) 
p in in the l.lhrar> Audrtorium.Philosophv 
Prolessors Dr. Richard Baker and Dr Sarah 
Brakman w ill lead a discussion on "Fihics 
.iiul Human Sexuality" 

*()n lliiiisd.iN. '\piil I .11 ' pin m 



Chapman (\inlerence Center, Zeia Tau 
Alpha will offer a Breast Cancer Seminar 
•On Monday. April 4, at 7: ^0 p.m. in 
Fdmunds Hall, IX Linda Berne asks die 
question, "AIDS and SID's - Are our 
StiKk-nts Really ai Risk ' ' This is a CEP 
event. Dr. Bemc is a l^ofessor at I'SC- 
Ch,irl(Mie, and she is the author of 4 Kxiks 
andover^Oariicleson sexuality. Twoofher 
biHiks are used lor sex education texilxxiks 
lor South Carolina public schtxils 

What bc-tter;Mul more appropnate place 
lo .uklress sexiialitx issius ih.in .i cidlege 



campus' " asks Resa Walsh, Assistant Dean 
of Siudenis. "College students should be 
given the opix^riunity to openly discuss 
sexuality issues, since many of these issues 
directly aflect iheir lives." 

Some sexuality issues include AIDS 
and STD's, unwanted pregnancy, sexist 
langiuigciindalliiudes, dale and acquaintance 
rape . ediics, ;uid human sexualily According 
to Walsh, "It's obvious dial students come 
face to face wiih diese issues often" 



FEATURES 



M< I DAY. MARCH 26, IW^ 



IKIDAY, MARCH 26, 1993 



ENVIRONMENT 



The History of Women at PC 

Women's History Week presents women in a new light 



by Martha Lynn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Noi many people know thai, although 
PC wasconsidcrcd an "all-male" instiiuuon, 
its first three graduates were women. 

Many students did consider PC to be an 
"all male" institution until the construcuon 
of Clinton Dorm made the school 
rcsideniially co-cd in 1965. But during the 
second Women's History Week observance 
ever to be held at the college, a program 
titled "Revisiimg the Past . . . Rewriiuig the 



Future" highlighted the historical role of the 
strength of women at PC. 

Assistant De^n of Students Resa Walcb 
and the three sororities, Alpha Delta Pi, 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, and Zci;» Tau ^Mpha, 
sponsored this event in the Harper Cenior 
last Monday night. Featured speakers were 
Marion Hill Weersing, PC's First Dean of 
Women; Martha Anne Green, Director of 
Career Planning and Placement; Belli 
Couture, Basketball and Volleyball Coach, 
and PC Alumna Jane McSwcen Jameson. 

Other recogni/.ed alumna were: 



*Dr. Clarice Johnson '411 )r. Johnson 
ran the PC Counseling Center lor ten years 

*Mrs. Marshall Brown. Mrs. BrovMi 
was the registrar at K" for 1 7 years and knew 
the names of each student. During Workl 
War II she wrote thousands of letters to 1*C 
soldiers. She received an honorary degree 
from PC 

*Mrs. Irene Dillard .\kS\'veeii ' vS 
Mrs. McSwcen was the firsi woman to 
complete a Chemistry degree. 

*.Mrs. Dorothy Dillard DuBose 41 
She was a commuier student and ran a 



Spotlight on Two PC Women 




Margaret Williamson 



Job Title; Vice President for Enrollement. Dean of 

Admissions 

Job Description: Oversees Admissions and Financial 

Aid Olfices, works with student enrollment retention 

Education : Bachelor of Arts, Masters in F-ducation, 

Winthrop University 

Committees: Officer of the College, Admissions and 

Financial Aid Committees, Chairman of the Retention 

Task Force, Long Range Planning, (Jutd(K)r(iraduation 

Plarming, Public RelaUons and Marketing Task Force, 

AdminisU"ative Computer Steering 

Professional Organizations: President elect of the 

NaUonal Ass(x laiion ol College Admissions Counselors 

Also oversees Presbyterian College/South Carol ma 
National leadership Conference. K7SCN is a week- 
long U'adcrship seminiu- for rising high sch(X)l junior 
and seniors. The conference gives students the 
opjX)rtunily to interact and learn from other leaders and 
to experience the PC campus life. 




r \ 



I 




t aC 



Martha Anne (Jreen 



Job Title: Director ol Career Plaiinim.' .iiul 1'Ln.eiiieiu 
(lomier AsscKiaie Dean of Stuilents) 
Job Decription: oversees counseling, programming, life 
planning and a.s.ses.sment,le;unmg skills, career counseling, 
personality types 

lulucalion: Bachelors ilegree in Psyeholog), niiinir in 
lUemeniary lulucation, Presbyterian College. Masters in 
Education and (iuidance and Counseling, Cleiiison 
University. 

Committees: Faculty Seuci.u> loi ( )imuoii Delia K.ii'im 
(leadership honor stKiety), guidance committee, Review 
Board for the PC Re[X)rt, Public Relations, (ireek and 
S(Kial Life, Russell Steering Committee, advisor lor WSH, 
COPE, and Leadership PC 

Prolessu)nal(,)rgaiii/atioiis : meiiiheiol Amerkant oik ec 
Personnel Assotiaiion, American Association ol Women 
III Higher lulucation. College Placement ( "(nincil 
WSH (a^lvison: At a time when wonieii on campus 
wanted to lorin a rionseleclive grou[) to a(klress the social 
lile lor women on campus, "Dean Oreen" hel|)ed them 
lorm that group. 

in]i> rrruiUnn (omfiliut /»v Ktm Rithun 
f>hi'lii\ h\ kiiri ( iihsnn 



kindergarten out o\ her own home. 

*Mrs. (ieorgia B. Young Thomason ' 
v^ She was another commuter student w ho 
kit l-.rskine tnaiteml PC when the Board ol 
Trustees voted m 1*'>I to re-o[K'n K' to 
women at ter a |vriod of restriction. At that 
time she noted a problem with PC's motto, 
"I'reshyteriaii College, where men are 
nukle " This motto did not change until 
|y^(S. Mrs i'homason said, ".Although those 
\\ere the tiark ages lor women at K' - llicy 
were also glorious nines in mans ways," 

.Mrs. Weersmgreinemlvretllhatin l'H>> 
the Board ol Tnisiees matle the decision to 
make the sdiiHil resuleniiallv lo ed and that 
eonsiruciion was begun on ifie Last Pla/a in 
IMM, Sheremeinhereil that the transition to 
having teniale hoarders made some male 
sluik'iils uiii'.iNS ()ike the e.irls were 
assimilated on eam[nis, the\ prospered 
academiealK I low ever, the scdiallile didn't 
chanee as rapidU PC male students still 
dated pri III. iriK "imiHii is,' even going. is Lk 
as asking PC leiiiale siutlents to house their 

\lsilnrs 

.Mumii.i ki;,, .,> .(.•eii Janieson also 
remeinlvredtherou!'hir:uisiiionlorwonien 
Male iiieiiiherN ol ik r Sports Club 

would sit oil the steps. iinl i.iiik PC co-eds on 
abe.iiity scale.isitks w.ilkeiltn IX'women 
raiikedamaxmiuni seoreol \ while imports 
raiiki.l .1 nuiiiiiKiiii stuie ol in Jameson 
cited tli.ii one le.isoii loi the derogalt»r\ 
attitude lc»warcl the new temale students was 
that the men didn't think that ihev were 
serious about education Women soon 
dis|vlled these an.xieius, and they worked 
to hold viable roles on campus. 

Martha Anne (Ireen highlighted llie 
aceomplishments ol wDinen at I*C. "Dean 
(ireen," as she is alleetionaiely called, was 
hersell .i iiu'intH-i oi ih.it first ekiss ol 
treshm.in i;iils to Ii\e in Clinton Hall m 
P>()S 

III the p.isi there have Km five female 
SCiA Presidents, the lust lemale ROK" 
eommaiHler in V)H2 and a lemale Rhinles 
Scholar 111 Vmi Iklore P>S: the dorms and 
the Women's Council were the only sotial 
"organi/atioiis "available lolemalesiudenLs. 
In that year, (ireen and sever.il women 
stiidenistormedthe W()iiK-n'sS(KialHalllo 
provide such. moutlet for wtMiien. I he advent 
ol sororities, begun by student initiative, 
olleieil women more opportunities lor the 
ai uHiiplishmenLsol K' Women, ( ireen said 
siiiipK, "\'ou've come a long wav, baby " 

Coath Beth Couture s|)oilighteil the 
mle ol PC lemale athletes. She [)iaised the 
late Jane llammeiasihe "pioneer ol lemale 
sports at PC" .Most women's s[)orts teams 
were started ascliih teams h> llaimnei and 
others, with tennis beginning in l'>7l, 
volleyball in 1''/^ basketball in l''/;,aiid 
siKcenn P'.Sh ShecreditedRandv Kandall 
and Ralph Poison lor their work in 
implenieiiting the initial basketb.ill and 
scKcer teams. Novs |'( uonieii s s|Hwts 
leamshavegaineilnalioii.il pioiiiinenceand 
esteem "You have to rvs[)ect the time and 
the elloit put into these teams by hoUi the 
players and the coaches." said Couture. She 
remimled PC stialenis."Siip|H)rt soul temale 
athletes ' 



(Jarol Browner named head of KPA 

by Kristina Pruitt 

ST AIT WRri"L:R 

During the presidential elections last year the environ- 
ment wasa highly debated aiidconuoversial issue. Clinton 
and Gore acknowledged the problems facing the environ- 
ment and promised that changes would be made in order 
loensure a healthier planet. Although the environment is 
a major thnist in the Clinton administration, a balance 
k'tween indusuy and enviriMimeni must K' maintained. 
Clinton's EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) ad- 
ministrator, Carol Browner, will be expected to maintain 
the balance and manage a high profile Washington orga- 
ni/aiion 

•As the scaeuirv lor the Morida Department ot Envi- 
ronmental Regulation, Browner exhibited an ability to 
negotiate until lx)ih sides were happy. When Hurricane 
Andrew struck Southern Florida last summer, she agreed 
to gel ivrmiis lor Floriila Power and Light so that they 
could immediatelv Ivein lavinu iiower lines. The agree- 
ment hinged on the condition thai the new power lines be 
lonsirucied away from delicate :ireas and that platforms 
be placed b> the road tor bird nesting. As a result, both 
environmentalists and the jxiwercompany were satisfied. 

.Another example ol Brow ner's ability was revealed 
when Wall Disney World wanted to fill Mi) acres of 
wetlands. Browner readiK approved the pro[X)sal with llie 
agreement lh.it Disnev ■sjxmuI about S4() million to bu\ 
and restore KIKMI.iaesol endangered weUands outside ot 
Orlando " 

Brownei -..^ ,>,,.wsiul in llorida, and wiili her sue 
a-ss she gamed supj^orters. Browner also gained a repu- 
tation ot being "abrasive" and "uncompromising" from 
iier emplovces .m ' Regardless o\ these 

diar.kterisiics, she geii the job done. She has Iven 
des^ibed as having the soul (^t an activist and the mind ot 
a lawyer. 

John Shelx-I, head o\ Fk)rida's largest business trade 
asstviation. descrik'd her style to I he Wa.shtniiton P(ku: 
She kicks the dix)r o[Kn, throws in a hand grenade, and 
then walks in lo shixu w bo's left. She realK divsnt like 
lv)atmpromise." Shelvl d(*''^ r'VOiMii/iMh.ii she has done 
a giHKl |ob, hi)wever 

t )n the other hand, J. Michael McCloskey, chair^vrson 
ol tfie Sierra Club, lold I he Wushini;ion Post referring to 
Hfow ner "She is like a breath of fresh air alter 1 2 years 
of choking smog She will successfully implement the 
( lintoii/(iore adminisiraiion |H)licies to protect public 
health and the environment from degradaiuMi" Both 
Shelvl and McCk)skey. although from dillerent points ot 
view. Ivheve th.it Browner is capable of managing the 
l.PA. 

Noi everyone feels confident alxtul Browner's abilil\ 
10 tiandle the EPA. The tad remains that she has never 
hekl a |X)siiion in a huge executive agency. People are 
wondering 1 1 she will tv indepc'iideni despite her close nes 

toOore Noone knows whattoexivct from Browner, but 
all will t mil ouiscHMienough I'he environment is a major 
pan ol the Clinton admimstralion, and it something ha{ 
[K-ns- giKHl or bad it w iH Ix- sigml Kant 

l-nvironincntal Conference planned 

by Kathryn Spearman 

.STAFFWRIIFR 

This Saturday, March :X\ the SC branch of the Student 
Environmental Action Coalition will hold its first suit 
conference Emitled SLACing a. Solution in.SouthCaro 
lina,' It will unite statewide environmental groups. Man> 
worksliops will tv hell) covering topics such as recycling 
and green consumensm 

Ihe conference will K' at the University ol South 
CaiolinamCola Itlvgmsal KHOa.m andwillconclude 
at (vIK) pin wiih imisic afterwards by guitarist Laura 
Williams. Lveryone is inviied to atlend. Foi lunher 
inlonnaiuHi, contact Kathryn Sivarman at 8 VV 1010 




SPORTS 



IKIDAY. MARCH 2(>. IW3 



Baseball team to retire Marcus Miller's jersey on Sunday 



By Everett Calls 
SPORTS EDITOR 

ThisSunday willbeacommemoraiive 
day for the Blue Hose Base ball team. Before 
PC plays Wingate, the #3 jersey of Marcus 
Miller, who died in a car accident last 
October, will be retired. The dedication 
ceremony will begin at 1:45, and Miller's 
parents will be in attendance to take pan in 
the event Head Coach Tim Corbin and the 
rest of the team strongly encourage all 
students, faculty, and staff to attend the 
dedication ceremony. 

While many students were away over 
Spring Break, the Blue Hose baseball team 
remained at school to host the Sprmg 
Tournament, Besides PC. Greensboro, 
Belmont Abbey, and Piedmont Colleges 
participated in the three-day event. 

On March 7 the Blue Hose defeated 
Greensboro College. With the score tied 6- 
6 in the bottom of the ninth, catcher Joe- 
Henry Berube hit a solo home run over the 
left field fence to win the game. 

On the following day, PC played 
Belmont Abbey College. Despite gaining 
a 4-2 lead on the Crusaders, the Blue Hose 
lost, 6-5. 

That afternoon, the PC squad hosted 
Piedmont College, a team that had beaten 
the Blue Hose 1-0 on February 12. But this 
lime It was the Lions who were shut out. 
Behind the pitching of Darren Bane and 



back-to-back homcruns by Berube and Before the tournament, F^C hosted 

leftfielder Paul Bushway, PC won, 10-0. Davis-Elkins on March 2. The Blue Hose 

Berube had a grand slam, while Bushway gotthcirfirstshutoutofthcscason, winning 

followed with a solo shot. 6-0. 

On March 1 1 the Blue Hose were in the The Blue Hose began conference play 

Championship game against Belmont again.st Elon, March 6-7. Alter losing the 




PC's Elton Pollock scores a run in the Newberry game, photo by Kim Gibson 



Abbey. Unfortunately, the PC team lost 7- 
5. 

Both Bushway, who was8forl3(.615), 
and Berube were named to the All- 
Tournament Team. 



first game in a doublcheadcr, 7- 1 , PC came 
back and defeated the Fighting Christuins, 
7-6. Elton PollcKk's solo honiorun in the 
Hih inning scaled the victory. Although the 
Blue Hose had evened the series at one 



game apiece, they lost the final game, 7-5. 

After the Elon scries and Spring 
Tournament, PC was scheduled to play 
Carson-Newman in another SAC-H scries 
on March 13-14. Because of the winter 
storm that hit Clinton, those games were 
postponed. 

F-'ollowing the snow storm, the Blue 
Hose played Ashland College in a two- 
game series on Miu^ch 16-17. Although the 
Blue F^ose won the first game *->-2, they lost 
the second one, 11-7. 

Two days later, PC hosted non- 
conference rival Newberry College. 
Despite leading the game 3-2, going into 
the Sth inning, the Blue Hose lost, 6-3. 

On March 2 1 PC travelled to Hickory, 
NC to play in a conference series against 
l.enoir-Rhyne. Although the Blue Hose 
had early 3-0 loads in the first and third 
games of the series, they could not hold on 
to their advanuige, losing 6-3 and 10-3. PC 
was swept by the Bears, losing game two 
by an K-O mark. 

Tomorrow PC will be hosting Wingate 
in the k'ginning ol an im|H)riani series. 
Following Saturday 'sdoubleheaderat 1:00, 
the Blue Hose play a single game on Sunday 
at 2:(K), when Miller's jersey is retired. 







Mallory McRae leads PC nettcrs 






i* '3^^^^' 



Ti' '^ 






Scott Ambn)se concentrates on returning an opponent's serve, phuo /.y Kim Cihsnn 



by Kverett Catts 

SK)RTS EDirOR 

TFie 19')3 PC Men's lennis 
Team is 9-3 this spring and 1 3-4 m 
both fall and spring matches 

Alter losing 7-2 at USC- 
Sparianburg on February 27, the 
Blue Hose edged Wol ford on March 
1 , 5-4. PC then came home the next 
day lo post their first conference 
win, crushing Mars FliU, HI. On 
March 4 and 6, the Hose posted shut 
outs against Augusta and ("arson 
Newman, respectively 

During Spring Fireak, PC went 
on the road to play against many 
ranked opponents. Following a 
March S loss to Coastal Carolina, 
the Blue Hose defeated Mobile 
College on March 10, SI. Two 
(lays later, PC shut out Spring Hill 
College, MO 

On March IS, the men's team 
returned from the road and defeated 
Huriimgton College, HI Ihe leaiii 
weni on lo an S I vu lory over SAC 
riv,il Catawba on March 20, 
iinpioving ifu- Blue Hose conkiiiue 
riH (»ul lo S I , 

1 his past week, the Hose nellcrs 



laced coiiipeiiiion Ironi Lincoln 
Memorial College and Filon College 
on March 24. In addition, the team 
hosted Kalama/oo College, last 
year's NCAA Division III National 
Champion, on March IS. 

Head Coach Bobby McKee 
credits a pari of Ins team's success 
to Mallory McRae, a seinor from 
Bainbrulge, (ieorgia MtKae is 
ranked I4ih in the nalion and won 
his I6ih match on March 20 against 
Catawba. "Mallory is having a very 
good year and is leading ihe team in 
wins," said McKee. 

McKee also credits his Ireshman 
players, specifically David Kem[), 
lor their effort so lar this \r.ii 
"David IS doing a good |ob at ihe 
nuinber (» spot, but he has not been 
pressed that much I haven't seen 
everything he can do. but he will be 
()ushed against our tougher 
op[)onenis," added McKee 

Alter playing Oueeris and Barion 
today and fomonow, ilu- H|,ic Hose 
will compete in ilu- .Shoiii-r 
liivilalional on April ' \ 



I KID. \Y,. MARCH 26. 1993 



SPORTS 



i 



DC 



Tidbits 



Part-time jobs available 

The Office of Career Planning 
and Placement announces the 
following part-time job 
opportunities: 

Job Description: Data Processor 
('onipany: Parker's Furniture 
Location: Laurens 
Hours: 15 to 20 hrs. a week 

Job Description: Office Assistant 
(j)nipany: Clinton Hardwoods 
Location: Clinton 
Hours: 15 to 20 hrs. a week 

Job Description: Nursery Worker 
Company: First Baptist Church 
Location: Clinton 
Hours: Sunday - AM & PM 

Job Description: Office Assistant 
Company: DialA)g Services, Inc. 
Location: Clinton 
Hours: 10 hrs. a week 

Job Description: WaiterAVailress 
Company: Terry's Restaurant 
Lwation: Clinton 
Hours: Flexible 

Job Description: Store Staff 
Company: Tru- Value Hardware 
Location: Clinton 
Hours: Flexible 

Job Description: Kitchen Staff 
Company: Hickoy Hills Bar BQ 
LiK'ation: Clinton 
Hours: llexible 

Job Description: Bank Rccon. 
Ctmipan\: Laurens Mntal Retard. 
Location: Laurens 
Hours: 10 hrs. a week 

If interested, students should 
stop by the Office of Career 
IMannins: and Placement and obtain 

more inh)nnaiu>n. 

SVS sets Special Olympics 
PC^'s Special Olympic games 
arc set for Friday, April Hi. 
Students who have signed up to 
assist with the games must attend a 
w or k shop on Sunday, April 4. The 
workshop is necessary to be 
excused from classes on the 16th. 
Anyone needing addilit»nal 
infoniialion shouki contact SVS 
C(H)rdinator Fanchon (Jlover. 



Blue Hose women's tennis team on the ball 



bv Kverette ("atts 
SPORTS EDITOR 

The 199.^ PC Women's Tennis Team is 
4-0 m conference play and has an overall 
record of 5-3. 

On l-ebruary 19, the lady nelters lost lo 
Emory, 6-2, and were defeated by Berry, 6- 
1 . on the following day. On February 23, K" 
shut out Lcnoir-Rhyne, 9-0. Five days later, 
the Lady Blue Hose got their second win in 
the S AC-S, defeating Carson-Newman by a 
score of 7-2. On March 4, the Lady Hose 
shut out conference foe Mars Hill. 

While many students were bathing in 
the Florida sun over sprmg break, PC 
competed in the Division II Southern 
Regional Tournament at Armstrong State. 
The Lady Blue Hose edged Berry University, 
5-4. The team was later defeated 5-2 by 
Valdosta Stale. Two of the lady nciter's 
matches were cancelled due to a winter 
slorm. 

"Overall, 1 thought there was a tough 
group of teams in the regional lournameni 
Allot the teams were rankedeithernauonally 
or regionally." said Head Coach Donna 
Arnold, 

"I thought we did very well against 
Valdosta Siaie We stayed with them bul 
lost some close matches," she added. 

On March 16. the Lady Hose came back 
toClinton to host Ciiirdner Webb. K'tfcleaied 
the Lad> Bulldogs, improving their 
conference record to 4-0. 

.Although her squad is undefeated in 
conference play, Arnold is not complacent. 
"With upcoming maichesagainst tough SAC 
Icvs such as Catawba, Wingate, .ind Elon, 
the ioughesiconi|vtition is ahead, " she said. 








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l*("s Dina l*adgelt keeps her eye on the ball as she prepares lo return a hit. 

photo by Kim Gibson 



Blue Hose receive first national tournament bid 
Georgetown ends PC's dream season ========== 



by Brian Sacco 
STAFE WRiniR 

After the men's basketball team 
rolled to the regular season SAC 
title and then fell short in the SAC 
tournament title game, anything was 
possible in post -season play. 
F-ollowing a first round bye m the 
District 26 H)urnament. F'C defeated 
Mars Hill. 7 1 -56, but was topped by 
its nemesis this season. Lenoir 
Rhyne, 74-66, in the district finals. 
PC s accomplishments were not to 
go unrewarded, however, as they 
received an ai-large bid to the NAIA 
Division 1 National lournameni in 
Kansas City. I lie Blue Hose lell 
short against Ceorgetown (KY) m 
the first round, ending PC's dream 
season. Bul as Head Coach Cregg 
Nibert stated, " Ihe team has a lot to 
be proud of. because their hard play 
led to an extremely gratifying 
season." 

In the semifinals of the Distnc 
26 playoffs, PC matched up against 



Mars Hill and came out victorious 
in a defensive battle. Bret Jones led 
PC with 1 6 points and nine rebounds, 
while Derrick Lovelace also 
contributed nine rebounds. In the 
finals o\ the district playoffs, the 
Blue Hose hosted rival Lenoir 
Rhyne. but the outstanding play of 
the visitors overwhelmed the Blue 
Hose. Jones once again led scorers 
and rebounders with 18 points and 
seven rebounds. 

In Kansas Cily, Georgetown 
controlled PC with a physical and 
perimeter-type game. Although the 
Blue Hose were dcleaied. Coach 
Nibert stated that the national 
exposure and experience would 
benefit the many returning players 
next season. 

Coach Nibert also stated. 'We 
had pressure from the prc-scason 
number one ranking, and winning 
the SAC title was gratifying. I am 
extremely proud with the season and 
the accomplishments of the team." 



The Blue Hose's final record of 27- 
5 overall and 13-1 in the SAC was 
the best in school history. 

Bret Jones, a senior co-captain, 
was named SAC Player of the Year 
and was named to the SAC All- 
Tournamcni Team, First Team All- 
District 26. and District 26 
Tournament Team. 

Andrew Wcllman was named 
SAC/Food Lion Scholastic Player 
of the Year and was also selected to 
the Second Team SAC and SAC 
All-Tournament Team. John Lloyd 
was also named to the District 26 
Tournament Team. 

In addition. Coach Nibert was 
selected by his colleagues as Coach 
of the Year for the SAC and for 
District 26. 

The success of the team this year 
will only continue to benefit the 
team in the future and will allow the 
Blue Hose basketball program to 
gain national prominence. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



8 



IRIDAV. MARCH :*., I'W( 



Acappella group uplifts the soul 



by Camisha Clarke 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 

In 1982 ihcpursuilofonc man's dream 
of a full-lime music ministry led to the 
establishment of a group whose innovative 
sounds, congruent melodies, and 
sensational all-vaal arrangements have 
captured the cars of the Christian music 
community. Keith Lancaster, the arranger, 
songwriter, and former lead vocalist of this 
group produced Acappella with the unified 
goals of glorifying Gcxl, reaching the lost, 
encouraging Christians, and providing a 
positive musical and lyrical alternative to 
temporal pop music. 

These goals of Acappella Ministries 
have fcKused the group and led it to a 
maturation of their all-vocal sounds. 
Lancaster says, "We have seen first-hand 
how G(xl can change lives using Christian 
music as a tcxil. Our goal is to allow Hini to 
use us in minisuy through our concerts and 
recordings." What began as one man's 
dream is now a full-fledged music minisuy 
committed to taking the message of 
salvation, hope, andencouragementaround 
the world. 

Acappella uses the power of music for 
influencing lives. Music is an effative 
way to break down barriers and draw people 
to the Lord. Coupled with the gospel, the 
music of Acappella ministries has inspired 



fans by its ability to uplift the soul, strengthen 
convictions, and lead people to the Lord. 
Acappclladisplays a full array of styles where 
all sounds are produced solely by human 
voices; this versatile performing group uses 
no instruments. In 1986 Acapp^lla's first 
radio single, "Acap[Kila," entered the CCM 
charts, followed by a second successful single, 
"More Than a Friend," in the lop 40. With 
their 1989 album Swcei Fellowship. 
Acappella sur^iassed sales of 12(),(XX) units; 
the 1990 release Rescue is quickly 
approaching that mark. 

On March 31st Acappella will be 
performing in Belk Auditorium at 8:(K) p.m. 
Tickets itfeS.S, and seating is reserved. Some 
tickets are still available, imd sales have been 
as widespread as Tennessee, Greenville, and 
Georgia. Contact Casey Ross at Fxt. 81 19 or 
Bo.x 988 for tickets. All checks should he 
made out to the Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes. 

Acappella is George Pcndergrass, lead 
singer, from New York by way of Los 
Angeles; Gary Moycrs, tenor, from Lubbixk, 
Texas; Waybum Dean, baritone, from Hobbs, 
New Mexico; and Duane Adams, bass, from 
Odessa, Texas. Acappella Ministries wants 
to provide enjoyablemusic with life -changing 
messages. 




The group Acappella will be performing at PC on March 31 at Helk .\udit<»rium. 
Seats are reserved, and tickets are still available at a price of $5. 



Carolina Cup ushers in annual rites of a Southern Spring 



by Tonia Snead 

STAFF WRITER 

Tomorrow thousands of people from 
all over the nation, including many PC 
students, will flock to 

historic Camden, the /^ 

oldest inland city in 
South Carolina. Their 
destination will be the 
Springdale Race Track, 
home of the famous 
Carolina Cup. 

For those of you 
who are from a foreign 
county, such as 
Massachusetts, the 
Carolina Cup is a series 
of six steeple chase 
events in which horses 
race around an oval 
u-ack and jump hurdles. 

According to 
many college students, 

the horses and the ^ 

racing are not the main 
reason foraitcnding the 
Cup. 

"Basically, the Carolina Cup is just 
one b"g cocktail party. In all the years I 
have attended, I don' t ever remember seeing 
a horse," said one student. 

The Carolina Cup is considered by 
many to be the premier social event of the 



season, since it is basically a celebration of 
the arrival of spring in the South. According 
toofficials with the Cup, between 7(),(XX)and 
9(),(XX) people attended last year's event. 







The same number is expected this year. 

"I am l(x)king forward to the Cupbetause 
it IS a chance to see a large number of col lege 
students from across the Southeast," said 
Senior Martha Lynn Smith, who will he 
attending her first Cup this year. 

Smith reminds everyone that because 



the Cup falls before fiaster, white shcx's are 

not an option. 

The right kind of clothes is always a 

concem for a big s(xial event such as the 
Cup. "InmyexfX'nence 

>^ with the Cup, I have 

seen people wear 
everything from 
tuxedos to bluejeans. 
There is a real mix of 
people, and that is what 
makes the whole thing 
inieresiing," said Junior 
Jason West, who 
happens id he j 
Kershaw County 
native. 

Iickets for the event are 
still available and can 
be purchased at the gate 
forSH). The gales open 
tomorrow al S:3() am, 
and jx)st time for the 
first race is set for 2:(X) 
pm. Cieneral parking 
costs an additional 

"The most fun I had last year at the Cup 
was seeing my friends from other colleges. 
I even s;»w some [K'ople there that I hadn't 
seen since high sthcxil graduation," said 
Sophomore Shealy Painter. 



Hickory Hills 

Bar-B-Que 

Old Laurens Rd. 

Clinton, SC 2^)^2.S 

H33- 2(M) -Carolina s Finest 




iJ^' 



Attention All PC Students! 
Take A Bar-B-Que Break! 

All PC students receive a lU'/r 
discount on our dining buffet every 
Thursday night with valid ID. 
"All VouCareioKat!" J 



RAISE A COOL 
$1,000.00 

IN JUST ONE WEEK! 

For your frat, sorority, club. 
+ $10n()FOR YOrRSELF' 
And a FRKE K.LOO 
COOLKR if you qualify. 
Calll-8(K)-932-0528.Ext.65. 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume l.XX.XVII Number 10 



"dive (he people the li^hl, si> they may find the way." 
PRF.SR\TF.RIAN COLLEGE Clmion. South Carolina 29325 



Friday, April 23, 1993 



Security to be installed in male dorms 

Entire campus to operate on card system 



by Jason West 

EDITOR- IN-CHIFF 

PC females will not be the only 
group buying dorm cards during 
room registration in the Tail. 
According to F^ublic Safely Chief 
Cirey Mayson, a security system will 
be implemented in every male 
residence hall on campus during the 
summer, and the security system in 
the female dcums will also be 
upgraded. 

"The security system we 
currently use is 10 years old and 
was originally designed to protect 
three female dorms. Lhe college 
has outgrown that system. We need 
a new system that has more 
monitoring capability and will belter 
secure students and their property ,' 
said Mayson. 

During its last meeting, the 
Board of Trustees approved the 
spending of $H(),()()() to upgrade the 
college's dorm security. The college 
is currenly looking at bids for the 
upgrading. Plans are to install .i 
new security system during the 
summer and to have it operational 
by the beginning of the fall semester. 

"We decided that while we were 
upgrading the security in the female 
dorms, it wiiuld be best to install a 
system in the male dorms. We are 



On The Inside 



Page 4 . . . 

Public Safety closes classrooms 
in Neville Hall due to vandalism. 

Page 5 . . . 

PC seniors recall their favorite 
memories of college life. 

Page 6 . . . 

Andy Welch brings his own 
brand of talk to the air waves of 
Radio PC. 



trying to plan for 10 years in the 
future," said Mayson 

Andy Alti/er. PC's director of 
residence life, staled that security is 
needed in ihe men's dorms to reduce 
the number of thefts "We have had 
a large numberof thefts in the men's 
residence halls this year, especially 
in (jeorgia Hall. A security system 
is needed to prevent these thefts, ' 
he said. 

"Security is there to protect the 
student and is designed to keep 
outsiders t>ul," added Alti/er. 

Reportedly, the new system w ill 
operate similarly to the current 
system used by female students. All 
students will be given a dorm card 
which will give them access to their 
particular dorm. In addition, the 
system will have a feature on it that 
will automatically alert Public 
Safety when a door is propped open 
for more than \> seconds. 

"I know that there will probably 
l>e some opposition by male students 
ccnicerning this new security system. 
Change is hard to get used to. 
However, this change is in the best 
interest of all PC students," said 
Alii/er. 




PC student Tony Grant congratulates a Special Olympics participait. 
Special Olympics was held in Bailey Stadium on April 16. 

photo by Andf Aliiur 



\^ 



Personnel search ends in selection of new administrator 



bv Le,|eanna Maddox 

MaXNAC.ING EDirOR 

After months of searching and sifung 
through over fifty resumes. Academic iVan 
Dr. William Moncriel announced on 
Thursday that a new assistant acadenuc dean 
has been selected. Dr. Ronald IXMupsey will 
officially liike over in the capacity of assistant 
academic dean and director ol student records 
onjiine 14, |WV 

IX'nipsey is currently the director ol 
academic affairs at Southern Baptist 
Theoloj;ical Seminary in Louisville, 
Kentucky, where he received a Master of 
Divinity degree as well as a PhD in the 
scKMology ol religion. He also holds a 
Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Wake 
forest University and a Master of Arts in 
scK'iolojiy from the University of Louisville 

According to Moncrief, tX'mpsey will 



ht)Ula slightly nuHhIied version of the 
position formerly held by Bill Gash. "His 
primary arcasof rcsptinsibility will be foreign 
study , the computen/auon of student records, 
academic program assessment, and other 
assorted duties m the registrar's off ice." said 
Moncrief. 

Although the ptxM of applicants was 
narrowed to eight, fX'mpscy was the only 
candidate interviewed "He was clearly the 
Ix'sl qualilied. We interviewed him hrsi, 
and It was the last interview," explains 
Moncrief. "The other hkully members who 
met him were equally as impressed as 1 was. 
We saw no reason to go any further." 

According to Moncnef , Dcmpsey siixxl 
out ah«)ve the rest of the applicants because 
ol his ex|X"riencc, (vrsiMialiiy, and interest 
in wt)rkmg in a liberal arts, church related 
insiiiulion "He was undoubtedly the most 
qualified applicant on pajvr and in person," 



adds Moncnef. 

Dcmpsey will come to Clmion with his 
wife, Pam, and their infant daughter, Cason. 

Two of the four new faculty posiuons 
for next year have been solidified, as well. 
Dr. Craig Hill will replace the retiring Dr. 
Lewis Hay as an assistant professor of 
religion He is an ordained Methodist 
minister with a PhD from Christ Church 
College of Oxford University in England. 
In addition, Dr. Cclia Fryer will join the 
M(xlem Foreign L;uiguages Department as 
an assistant professor of Spanish. She holds 
a PhD m Spanish from CNC Chapel Hill. 

Positions remain to be filled in the math 
and sociology departments. Applicants arc 
currently being interviewed by members of 
thiise deparuncnts. 



THE BLUE 




STOCKING 



Volume l.X XX VI I Number 10 



"Give the people the light, su they may find the way." 

l'Rf-SH\THRlAN C'Ol.LFX'iF flmton. South Carolma 29325 



Friday, April 23. 1993 



Security to be installed in male dorms 

Entire campus to operate on card system 



bv Jason West 
EblTOR-lN-CfJIFF 

PC females will not be the only 
group buying clorni cards during 
room registration in the fall 
According lo Public Safely Chief 
Cirey Mayson, a security system will 
be implemented in every male 
residence hall on campus during the 
summer, and the security system in 
the teniale dorms will also be 
upgraded. 

"The security system we 
currently use is 10 years old and 
was originally designed to protect 
three female dorms. Fhe college 
has outgrown that system. We need 
a iicw system that has moic 
moiuioring capability and will better 
secure students and their properiv. ' 
said Mayson. 

During Its last meeting, the 
Board of Trustees approved the 
spending ol SHO. ()()() to upgrade the 
college's dtuni security. Fhe college 
IS currenly looking at bids for the 
upgrading. Plans are lo install a 
new security system during the 
sumnier and lo have it operational 
by the beginning of the fall semester. 

"We decided thai while wc were 
upgrading the security in the female 
dorms, it would be best to install a 
system in the male dorms. We are 



On The Inside 



trying to plan for 10 years in the 
future," said Mayson. 

Andy Alii/er, PC's director of 
residence life, stated that security is 
needed in the men's dorms to reduce 
the number of thefts. 'We have had 
a large numberof ihefts in the men's 
residence halls this year, especially 
in Cieorgia Hall A security system 
IS needed to prevent these ihefts," 
he said. 

"Security is there to protect the 
siudeni and is designed to keep 
outsiders oui," added Alti/er. 

Reportedly, the new system will 
operate similarly to the current 
system used by female students. All 
students will be given a dorm card 
which will give them access to iheir 
parlicular dorm. In addition, the 
system will have a feature on it that 
will automalically alert Public 
Safety when a door is propped open 
for more than IS seconds. 

"I know thai there will probably 
be some opposition by male students 
concerning ihis new security system 
Change is hard to gel used {v 
However, this change is in ihc best 
interest of all PC students," said 
Alti/er. 



"N 



0^ ^Sm 




PC student Tony Grant congratulates a Special Olympics partkipaat 
Special Olympics was held in Bailey Stadium on April 16. 

photo by Andy Mtiier 



Personnel search ends in selection of new administrator 



Page A ... 

Public Safety closes classrooms 
in Neville Hall due to vandalism. 

Page 5 . . . 

PC seniors recall their favorite 
memories of college life. 

Page 6 . . . 

Andy Welch brings his own 
brand of talk to the air waves of 
Radio PC. 



bv Le.leanna Maddox 

MANA(il\(i FIMTOK 

After months of searching and sifung 
ihroui;h over fifty resumes. Academic fX'an 
l)r William Moncrief announced t>n 
Thursday thai a new assisiantacadcmic dean 
has been selected. Dr. Ronald IX-mpsey will 
ofllcially take ovcrin the capacity of assistant 
acatleinic dean and director of student records 
on Iiine M, IWV 

iXMiipsey IS currently the director ol 
academic al fairs at Southern Baptist 
rheological Seminary in Louisville, 
Kentuckv, where he received a Master of 
Divinity dei;ree as well as a PhD in the 
s(Kiology of religion Ho also holds a 
Bachelor of Arts in psychok)gy from Wake 
forest Univorsiiv and a Master of Arts in 
sociology Irom the University ol Louisville 

Acct>rding to Moncrief, Dcmp!k.'y will 



holda slightly mtxlified version of the 
jx)sition formerly held by Bill Gash. "His 
primar>'areasofa'sponsihility will be foreign 
study , thecompuien/auon of student records, 
academic program assessment, and other 
assorted duties in the regisuar'soffice." said 
Moncrief. 

Although the p(xil of applicants was 
narrowed to eight, Dempscy was the only 
candidate interviewed. "He wascle;irly the 
k'si qualified. We interviewed him hrsi, 
and It was the last interview," explains 
Moncrief. "The other faulty members who 
met him were equally as impressed as 1 was 
We saw no reason to go any further" 

According to Moncrief , tXmpsey stixxl 
out ab(we the rest of the appficants btxausc 
ol his experience, personality, and imcrcsi 
in working in a liberal arts, church related 
insiiiulii>n "He was undoubtedly the most 
qualified applicant on pajx'r and in {vrson," 



adds Moncrief. 

Dempscy will come to Clinton with his 
wife, Pam, and their infant daughter, Cason. 

Two of Ihc four new fatuity posiuons 
for next year have \xcx\ solidified, as well. 
Dr. Craig Hill will replace the retiring Dr. 
Lewis Hay as an assistant professor of 
religion He is an ordained Mclhixlisi 
minister with a PhD from Christ Church 
College of Oxford University m England, 
In addition. Dr. Celia Fryer will join the 
Mtxlern Foreign Languages Department as 
an a.ssisiani professor of Spanish. She holds 
a PhD in Spanish from UNC Chapel Hill. 

Positions remain to be hi led in the math 
and sixiology depiirunenis Applicants arc 
currently being interviewed by members of 
iht).sc deparuncnts. 



EDITORIAL 



IklDAY, APRIL 23. IW3 



All I ever really needed to know I learned in the BS office 



by Martha Lynn Smith 

FEATURES EDITOR 

Never say thai Presbyterian College 
doesn't have its perks. 

Because I have worked on the Blue 
Stocking staff for four years, 1 gel to write 
this editorial thanking the people who have 
made my four years al PC more than 
memorable. 

Don't you wish you could do it too? 

Actually. 1 think thai my words will 
speak for everyone. There are many different 
kinds of people here, but the memories of 
the graduating class will prove that the 
college experience is similar in many ways. 

I estimate that the average number of 
all-nighiers that a senior has pulled while 
studying would be somewhere from five to 
[cn. Do you remember your most stressful 
late night, or more imporlanily, do you re- 
member your study breaks? 

Our freshman year Ami Davenport, 
Dennie Lynn Hill, and I spent our umc 
studying for our biology tesi eating chips 
and French onion dip and standing on llie 
desks singing Chrisunas carols. Ami made 
an Aon her test, and Dennie Lynn and I were 
lucky if we made C's. You'd think that for 
the sake of my grades, I'd learn that I talk loo 



much to study with anybody. Heck no! 
That's most of the fun. 

Sometimes I'd study or work in the 
newspaper office laic in ihe night. Invari- 
ably, Reeder or Nefson, Gcxl bless them, 
would bang on ihe window while 1 was 
concentrating on my work. Then they'd 
have to .scrape mc off the ceiling. 

Those who are on SG A, The PacSac.oT 
SUB know thai strange things happen after 
midnight in Springs. Random things get 
placed in mailboxes, pictures gel defaced, 
tantrums get thrown, friendships are made, 
stupid songs gel sung (ask Jason West lo 
sing Meli-kaliki-inaka for you), professors 
gel talked aboui, Lauren Owings married 
Bubba James Earl Builalucco F"red Cromer 
in a m(K)nlii ceremony, and people gel really 
inovauve when ilie dtK>rs to iho mam pari of 
the building arc locked. Many of my best 
memories and friends ai PC have been a pari 
of this rowdy, but responsible, group. 

Of course, I musi mention the people 
who threw all that stress upon us p(K)r stu- 
dents. We all have our favorite professors. 
Friends come from every corner of this 
schu)l. Going to visit Dr. Thompson at Ins 
house or learning from Dr. Skinner are two 
ofthe highlights of my college career. Some 
classes were- well, lets just say- difliculi. 



But the number of times I have laughed or 
been challenged in a Coker, Hobbie, Prater, 
Bumside, Beasley or Hudson class nuikes 
me know that I will never question my 
parents' investment. My professors were 
always supporuve, not only in the dass- 
rcK)m but also in personal situations as well. 
When my beloved Mr. Matt died, the sup- 
port that Tom Stallworih and Dr. Skinner 
gave me proved the su-ength o\ the PC 
family. 

Some among us have realized that 
Admin is not a haunted house of horrible 
administrative monsters. Paula Sanders al 
ways has a smile for anyone who enters the 
building, but beware, because Margaret 
Williamson has a bag oi practical jokes up 
her sleeve. LX'an Green comforts with her 
reassuring smile, and Dr. Orr always has a 
kind word to give. Chris, Randy, and 
( 'h;u-|otle in Springs alwavs give me cands , 
and ihey handle Hi >it ihc day quae 

well The canteen sLill ami Mrs IXinon in 
CiDII lu-e also wontlerful, .My hero, Tom 
Stallwonfi, and his beautiful, wunderlul, 
sweet and charming wile, Mary, will always 
be my Irieiuls. And one day 1 will work like 
(irani, Jd, and Steve do in the Public Rela- 
tions Oftico, and I will e(>mo up with a ickr 



that IS worse than one of Steve Owcns's 
feeble attempts . 

Needless H) say, there are many faceis 
lo the learning exp^-rience. I'll tell you right 
now that I have Iciirned more about dealing 
with people in these four years tlian 1 ever 
have in my life. Believe it or not, l*C is a 
[xilitical institution, and ihcrewillalwaysbe 
someone whose opinion differs from yours. 
Look lo develop your integrity. Lauren 
Owings has. and she will lead Presbyterian 
College well next year. RememlxT this 
qiKUation from William Blake: "Without 
contraries there are no progressions ' The 
entire student body would do itself well to 
l(K)k at all things Ironi all angles It is the 
epiiome of education. 

My college ye;irs have Ixvn wonderful. 
I will never have Iriends again like the ones 
I have made at thissehix)! 1 am not alone in 
saying this. I.eJeanna Maddox, who has 
served the college laithlully during her lour 
ve.ifN .is a siiideiil, was going to wnie this 
etiitorial all tlo manv iiiiun m our 

eollege careei ., she has a busy night tonight; 
ihanklullv , she passeil thisoppoiiiiiiity on to 
ine liliink I s[>eaklorheras well. l-nn)ythis 
nine, It PC li won't uHiieaeam ,aiul we;ire 
all the beitei lor having Iven here. 



pNgRmiAnONS 6RADS 




The Blue StfM kin^ of Prcibylcrian College 
Clinlon, South Carol in«, W325 
Volume LXXXVII. Number 10 
Apnl23, 1993 



Edilor in Chief Jason West 

Managing Editor lu;Jcanna Maiklox 

News Editor Ricky Dill 

Politics Editor Ted Carmichacl 

.SporLs Editor Everellc Calls 

Entertainment Editor Camisha Clarke 

Features Ediior Martha Lynn .Smith 

Environment Edilor Heather Moncricf 

Photography Eduor Kim Cubson 

Layout Editor Angela Richardson 



AdverUsing Edilor Ann Mayficld 

Subscriptions Editor Ron Minon 

Artist Michael Christensen 

PhfHof^raphy Staff 

Kimlierlee Ciibson Todil Love 

Staff Writers 

llli/alx'th Cunard Amanda Ftowers 

ixigh Hearnhurg Kalherinc Bonner 

Krislina Pruiil Cher Eulbright 

Paula Warren Michelle Canley 

Brian Sacco Shelly Phipps 

Kim Kabon Janiey Pale 

loliin ruriRT I'onya Snead 



The Blue Sl(Hlunf( is a tri weekly student publi 
cation olPresbyteriiinCollegc The papwr serves 
as a lorum of news and opinion of legional and 
national concern. For advenismg, eontaci Ihe 
BlueStmhng, Presbyterian College. Box lOftl. 
Clinton. SC 1^^2^. The Blue Sunluna ^'fl 
comes letu-rs to the editor trorii all members of 
the PC community Signaiures arc required 
Letters are jTrinted on a sp.itc available tusis 
The Blue Storking reserves die right lo edit all 
letters for pro[x-r grammar and punaii.iuon 
The (inal dcidline for subinillmg Iciicrs is In 
day al 12 (M)pmuii the week f>elorepublicalum. 




FRIDAY, APRIL 21 1W3 



NEWS 



Graduation 
activities set for 

May 7 and 8 



by Lauren Ov^ings 
SOCIETY EDITOR 

F-'or the first time since l')6(), 
Presbyterian College will hold its 
commencement outside. Graduation will be 
heldon Saturday, May 7, 19^3, and will uike 
place on ihe West Pla/a in from of Neville 
Hall. 

Graduation festivities will actually 
begin on Friday aflcrn(H)n, May 7, al 5:M) 
with the senior barbeque on the West Pla/a. 
The U"aditional 
sen 101 program 
will follow thai 
at l.M) pm in 
B e I k 
AuditoriiHii 

Saturday's 

activities will 

begin ail l:(M 

am with the 

Baccalaureate 

Service in Be Ik 

Auditorium. 

Spciikmgatthi' 

service will i 

Dr. Lewisli 

Scoil Hay, (iiik'spif jiieph<>u> 

PC's retiring Curnelson Professor of 

Religion. Lunch will be served m ihe 

Greenville Dining Hall Ironi I2:(X) until 

2:(K) pm, followed by a ceremony for honor 

graduates m F-dmunds Hall at .^^'' 

pm. 



CtninK'aenMtt 
exercises will 
lake place on 
Ihe Wesi Pla/a 
at 4:00 pm. 
The Class of 
1993 will be 
addressed by 
Dr David 
Gillespie, PC's 
professor of the 
year, and 1-aura 
Smith, the 
1 u I) \ 





file f'hoii 



outstanding smilh 
senior. 

In an attempt to ensure that parents anil 
family members will have access to prune 
.seating, each senior will be issued fourtickeis 
fora reserved seating area. There is no limii, 
however, on the number ol [vople w ho m.iv 
attend the ceremony 

In ihe cveni of rain, commencement 
will be moved to its traditional ItKation in 
Templeton Gymnasium Ihe four ticket 
[X)licy will siill apply, and remaining seats 
will Ix- available on a lirsi-come. first-serve 



Following the ceremony, iherewil I Iv a 
receptum on the West Pla/a m honor «<( ilir 
graduates 



National Guard promotes Nixon to brigadier general 




Press Release 

OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT 

GENERAL 

Joseph 0. Nixon, dean of students at 
Presbytenan College, was promoted to 
brigadier general in the South Carolina 
Army National Guard last month. General 
Nixon commands the Guard's 228th Signal 
Brigade, headquartered at Spartanburg. 

Nixon is a native of Georgia and a 
1963 graduate of Presbyterian College. 
He also received a master's degree from 
the University of South Carolina in 1981. 

The general .served two years in the 
United Stales Army before joining ihe 
South Ciu-olina Army National Guard in 
1968. He look command of the 228th 
Signal Brigade in June 1992. 

Nixon was pinned m a formal 
ceremony March 21 in froniof many of his 
fellow Guardsmen and Guardswomen al 
the annual conference of the Nauonal 
Guard A.ssociation of South Carolina. 



Brigadier (Jenerai Nixon, cf nter, gets his stars pinned on bv his wife, Mica, and 
Adjutant (Jentral I . Kslon Marchant. photo by MS(i Phillip Jrmes 



Students question why Safe Ride Shuttle will not stop off campus 



bv Heather (iritTith 

STAM- WRITLR 

It has become a familiar sighlon Friday 
and Saturday nighis: a grcy mini van with a 
Hashing yellow light taking intoxicated PC 
students from the Iralermty court lo the 
donns. However, some students believe 
that ihe grey mini van should make trips to 
off-c;impus housing m addiluw to stopping 
at the donns. 

The Safe Ride Shuttle progriun was 
started two years ago by Bacchus, an 
organi/atuui designed lo promote 
res}x)nsible drinking Due to some internal 
ditluculties, die shuttle was unable to run 
last semester It has, however, been running 
every Priday and Saturday night diis semester 
from6:(H)pm until 2:(K)am 

According to Patrick long, \uc 



president of Bacchus, the Safe Ride Shuttle 
exists for the benefit of students. "The 
puqx)se of the Safe R ide ShuiUe is to prov ide 
a safe and responsible way in which students 
can travel around campus on Friday and 
Saturday nights," he said. 

In light of ihat purpose, many students 
have questioned why the Safe Ride Shuttle 
will not go to off-campus housing and 
aparunenis, where a number of PC students 
reside. 

"Personally, I'm noi really sure why ihe 
shuttle d(x;s not go off campus," said Long. 
"I would assume that it hasn't been approved 
by the administration kcause of the safety 
as|x\ t in vol ved . The apartments are outside 
of the citv limits and out of Public Safetv's 



jurisdiction. If a fight broke out on the van 
or something else went wrong, it would lake 
a long time for the police to gel there." 

"Besides the problem of the shuttle's 
going off campus, 1 have gotten a lot of 
comments that people are glad it is running 
this semester. I think it is one of the most 
important student services that is on 
campus," added Long. 

Long also stressed the faci that, for 
operaU(Mi of the Sale Ride Shuttle toconunue 
next year, the program needs responsible 
drivers who arc willing to volunteer their 
lime. 

"It anyone is iniercsted in helping out 
for the remainder of this .semester or for next 
year, please contact me," said Long 



X 



/ 



The Episcopal Church Especially Welcomes Students 
+ ALL SAINTS' EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Ow Block SiiHh of GreffwUle l>nltig HcUl 



8 30 am 


Holy Eucharist 


f' WflcoBieto ^ 
CANTFRBIRV 


9 4$ tin 


( Imititn t'.auc«lK« 


tow am 


Coftrt im Piniri) HtU) 


tte F^Mk-cfwl mKlml irmp 


1100 am 


ftoiy Eucharlsl 


I m carafwt 


&faimk) EvcBUics 




' 9.00 pm 


C ANTFRBURY (at Crossroads) — fioly Eucharist 



* N90d som9on9 to talk to? 



llie Rev leaom%PtMtm.Prvsi.<mCmtpK (I3J-I295) 



Hickorv Hills 
Bar-B-Que 

Old Laurens Rd. 
Clinton, SC 29325 
833-2690 




1^' 
"Carolina' s FinesT 



Attention All PC Students! 
Take A Bar-B-Que Break! 

All PC students receive a 10% 

discount on our dining buffet every 

Thursday night with valid ID. 

"All You Care To Eat!" 



NEWS 



!RII)\Y, APRIL 21 V)')^ 



PC — 

Jidbifs 

Graduation practice set 

Practice for graduation will be 
held on Wednesday, April 28, 1993, 
at 4:00 pm on the West Plaza. In 
case of rain, practice will be in 
Templeton gym. 

All graouaies should be aware 
that the following fees must be 
paid prior to graduation: diploma 
fee ($25) to Registrar and all 
outstanding debts (Business Office, 
library, security, etc.) 

Caps and gowns will be given 
out at practice. Ifyou arc unable to 
atlena practice, please notify the 
Office of Academic Affairs or the 
Registrar's Office. 

Space deposit due May 1 

Students planning to return to 
campus next fall must pay a $2(K) 
space reservation deposit by May 
1, 1993. Failure to pay the $2()() 
deposit will result in the loss of a 
student's placement. 

The deposit should be taken to 
the Accounts Payable Office in the 
Smith Administration Building. 

Publication editors chosen 

The editors of next year's 
publications were selected by the 
Russell Program Subcommittee on 
Campus Communication earlier 
this week. Jason West, a rising 
senior from Kershaw, South 
Carolina, will continue to serve as 
ednoT-m-chitf of the Blue Stocking. 
Dena Elliott, a rising junior from 
Marietta, Georgia, will serve as the 
editor-in-chief of the PaC SaC. 
Tonya Snead, a rising junior from 
Augusta, Georgia, will serve as the 
Qdnor-in-chklofFi^sandThistles. 
In addition, the committee named 
David Hyers, a rismg senior from 
Filizabethon, Tennesee, as the 
manager of Radio PC. 

RA's of the Year selected 

For the first time in the college's 
history, the Residence Life Office 
has selected two students to be 
honored as the Resident Assistants 
of the Year. F^atnck Long, an RA 
in Bailey Dorm, and Laura Smith, 
an RA in Barron Dorm, were 
selected for the honor. According 
to Andy Allizer, director of 
residence life, the two will be 
presented with a iilaque in 
recognition of their acnieveinenl. 



Study area closed to students due to vandalism 





phHi' h\ Ktm Ciihson 



PC students tiike time (o study in Neville Hall. 

by Ricky Dill 

NEWS EDITOR 



According to PC's Director ot concerning the uivning ol Neville Hall ;ii 

Maintenance Jack Robertson, several night. The building is Irequenilv used hv 

incidenLsof vandalism within the pa.si month students as a study area during the evenmi; 

have resulted in a change of policy hours, but it apjKars that that privilege vmII 



have to be curbed. 

"There have been numerous 
(Kcurrences ot vandalism in Neville Hall. 
The vaiuLilism was nothing major butenough 
to cause a disturbance," said Robertson. 
"As a result, K' Public Safety has been 
forced to lock several ol the new ly renovated 
classrt)oms iii the building." 

According to Public Sateiy Chief drey 
Mayson, the incidents of vandalism did not 
merit an investigation by his department. 
"No complaint was reported, so we did not 
investigate the incidents. I Ivlieve it is just 
one of those unfortunate things that tend to 
hapjKMi when >nu leave a building ojvn," 
said Mayson 

The vandalism to Neville Hall included 
kiKx-king out screens m widows, tciuing 
down blinds, willing on walls, making 
tooiprinis on walls, aiul defacing some of 
the new work |usi completed in certain 
rooms. 

"Nothing III itic tniiUlms! was lorn up 
beyond repair, hiii Neville will delimieK 
l(X)k like an okl hiiikling lairlv scnm il this 
l>pe 1)1 destruction continues lo take place," 
said Robertson 

Roberison and Mayson re[)ort thai since 
ihey began locking cerLimclassriKHiidiHirs, 
no more vaiulalism has Uiken place 

Skip /uhrod, vice presiderii lor finance, 
will decide this week whether ihc closed 
classr(H)ms in Neville will tv i)|Kned for 
evening study during exam week. 



STUCK IN 
BURGER-TORY? 

Tired of burgers'? Aspire to sonnething higher Get a 

Subway sub We'll pile your favorite meats on fresh 

baked bread topped with free fixin's When you're 

stuck in a fast food rut, take a Subway out 




^UBUJRV^ 




FklLMY, APRIL 23, 1993 



FEATURES 



Those were the days . . . 



PC students remember their college years 



by Christie (Irani 

STAFT WRITtR 

Whether it was the fun times at fcKHball 
and basketball games, the parlies out at the 
fraternity houses, or those late night 
discussions at the Waftle House, F*C's 
graduating seniors will not soon torgel their 
college exjx-rience. 

Eeiv Takle: "1 will always rememk^r 
the times Dr. Dean Thompson txiught my 
freshman English class on the Iront steps ot 
Neville Hall. I'll also remember all of Dr. 
Thompson's funny jokes." 

Becky Slagle: '.M\ fondest menu)ries 
of PC will include the bonding that went on 
when I was a resident of Bailey Domi, the 
gtKxl scKiali/ing in the dining hall, and my 
semester siuding abroad in Irance." 

Jennilcr Ciordon: "1 will always 
rememlx'r siiung around with all my close 
friends watching the World .Series and eating 
pi//a." 

Beth .Schlich; "My best memories of 
PC will be s|vndmg time getting to know 
the fvsi fneihls I'll ever have " 



Neil Hunterand Cal Wheeler: "Spencer 



lO.'i. 



Rob Clarke; "My treshnum year, I 
lived on the first floor of Spencer. Il was a 
nasty experience. 1 remember trying to 
catch a rat with a milk crate in my rcxnn and 
trying to hit it with a bat." 

Erica Durham: "1 will never forget the 
joys of Christmas with friends at the annual 
candlelight sersiav I'll al.so remember 
having tun at the Clinton Hall/Gcorgia Domi 
Christmas Party." 

MikiKolader: "1 finally got my driver's 
license this past year at the age of 21. All ol 
my friends hail a puriy tor me, and all the 
Pikes brought balloons and made a big banner 
that said, 'Congratulations Miki.'" said 
Rolader. 

Ciina Robinson: "I will always 
remember the time 1 linished my senior 
seminar. To celebrate, my friends and I 
went to the Holiday Inn ;uid sang every song 
with the kareoke m;ichine." 




If the shoefits.wear it . . . If it doesn't, donate it 

Thornwell is collecting shoes for migrant farm 
workers. Ifyou would like to help, bring your 
old shoes to the front desk at Springs. 

rhank you for thinking of others. 





Paula (iraham and Dot share a hug. 



Hill (Jraves and l.ara Collier smile. 




Kevin Smith reads in Springs. 




Kd Kirkland finds a mailbox full of 'junk' mail. 



photos iouries\ of PaC SaC 



C n g r (1 1 u [ cv t i o n s 


to 


our (£jSj^^ mw 


Sisters! 


ZtlA JAM ^LPK^ 



FEATURES 



[RIDAY, APRIL 2.1 l')^)^ 



fklDAV, APRIL 23, 1993 



POLITICS 



Andy Welch introduces PC to talk radio with the Mayberry Show 




Andy Welch mans the microphone at Radio PC. Welch's show can be heard on 
Mondays from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. phoio by Km Gibson 



by Kim Kabon 

STAF F- WRITLR 

l^rry King, Oprah Winlrcy.ancl Rush 
Lmibaugh arc giani names when ii comes to 
radioand television talk shows, However, il 
you a.sk a typical \K^ student to name tiis 
knorite talking host, you might he snprised 
at the answer. Instead ot he;irmg King or 
Winlrcy, you might hear the name Andv 
Welch. 

Welch has become a Uilk show lavorite 
on Radio K" with his [X)[)ular Mavberrs 
Show, which airs on Monday nmhis trom 
-(H)toy:(K)pni 

According to \Selch, the Mayivrry 
Show preseiiLs controversial issues and o[vns 
campus telephone lines lor discussion, 
comments, and criticisms Some is.sucsi hat 
have been addressed on the stio'A iiKJiide 
abortion, gays m the miliLar>, temale roles 
m soviety, and atlirmative actuui. 

In addition, the show has conlronied 
1 A ,ii ! I! uch as the recent S(iA election 
u)niro\ersy, the possibility ol inde|vndeiu 
exams, and the arrival ol the FLACi iFrieiur 
ot Lesbian and (iassi group on campus. 

'vVcUh a junior, says he became 
interested m radio during his sophomore 
year ai I'C "Paul Rool intriKiuced me to 



Radio I'Cand we started doing music shows 
together," he said. 

Last summer, Welch came up w ith the 
idea ot creating his own talk show . Alter 
listening to a lew p()()ular shows and 
improving his mannerisiiisand style, he was 
given permission to start wiih the priKluction 
olhisown brand ol talk. 

Welch considers tlie show to be an a.ssci 
lo the campus and to him 'The show keeps 
students inlormed and gives them the 
op[X)rtumtytoct>mmumcaiewiih(nhersiKial 
groups. C'ommunicaiion allow s the barriers 
to Iv broken down," he said 

In addition, the sho.'. ,>,..,:-, me 
inlormed Fhe topics that are presented .ire 
ii~..\irLhed aiul thought out Being the 
mediator, 1 i.ani go into a show unawaieol 
all aspccLs," adtled Welch 

Welch re(>orts .i |X)sitive resjionsc lo 
1 he Mayberry .Show thus lar He sas s lh,ii 
an average ol 1 2 people call m on any given 
' 'hIc. 

'I appre. ,a>. .1., ;.,. . ,.,,. , - ..;i>' 
participate on the show it's only when ue 
s[K'ak out that diaiu'e can hapi I 

Welch. 



The Presbyterian College Writers ' Workshop 



REGISTRATION FORM 



Name 



Addms 



City. State, Zip 

Telephone ( ) . 



. Amount enclosed 



Please place a check mark by the side of the workshops that you wish to attend You may choose two If you choose two the workshop 
staff will assign you to Round I (Fridayl and Round 2 (Salurdayl Check also in the appropriate space lo submit a manuscript in advanrp 
for consideration by the workshop leader All manuscripts should be mailed by May I ^ to the address below Write prominently on thf 
back ol the envelope the workshop lor which you wish the manuscript to be considered Remember to place a check mark below opposite 
the manuscript type to Indicate that y .n will ^- t-r.dmg it by May I "> Workshop leaders may admit participants who havp not subnnllcd 
manscrlpis as auditors 



WORKSHOP 

. I Writing Fiction 
.2 Writing Poetry 
. 1 Writing for the Stage 



_4 Creative Non-Fiction 



WORKSHOP LEADER 

5cott F,ly 
Susan Ludvigson 
Ion Tuttle 



lames Kilgo 



MANUSCRIPT 

One chapter or story 

Five poems 

A one art play f>l 

not more than i^ pages or 
8 scene from a play with a 
paragraph 5ynr)psis ol play 

One example 



All participants will hear Stephen Corey give three sessions on editing for publication In addition, all workshop leadeis will give readings 
from their works | 

It Is possible that workshops will fill up quickly In the event that they do please write below the numbers ol workshops that you would ' 
prefer as alternates for those you have selected 1 

Alternate One • 



Writers ot all ages consiantiv search lor yy.t\s lo 

improve their skills. Presbvteriati ^^)lle^e's Riisscil 

Proerani Sieennu (\)inniiiiee and Llnglish Department 

nave assetiihleii a nationallv renowneii sialTot" 

professionals who will help writers ot all aues and 

abilities improve their wt)rk during the colle'.'cs 19') '^ 

Writers' Workshop. 

During the workshop, you'll leani more alx)ut 

poetry, fiction, drama, and much more. And, vou may 

share a table at lunch and exchange ideas with a 
published author. You may also have vour own works 

criiKjued during two interestinu and informative 

workshop sessions. And you wilfhear a himous editor 

give ailvice on publication. 

It you wish, you may stay m a comtortabic new 

residence hall on Presbyterian College's oak laden 

campus. Packages are also available which include all 

meals Or. vou may choose to travel to campus tor the 

workshops and activities. 

Whatever your pleasure, we invite vou tt> expenence 

what has thrilled Pope, Keats, and countless others 

throughout history . . . u(hh1 writiiiL'' 



Alternate Two # 



Alternate Three • 



Accommodations will be provided In Presbyterian College residence halls and trieals will be served in Greenville Dining Mall at the 
college Please check the arrangement you prefer and enclose a < heck lor that amount Regisiratmn deadline for room and meals is Ma 
26 (Other accomodations ai« available in local mcHels lor those who wish to make their own airangemenis i 



nU (No«-R«faiid«bl«|: 

S80 00 Covers registration, room, and meals 

$65 00 Covers registration and meals 

S" 00 Covers registration and rtxjm 

SH 00 Covers registration 

Pleas* complete and return this form with check made payable to Presbyterian College to 

WrtUra Worhahop 
Prwbytortaii CoMege 
CMmm, S.C, 29)31 

Fof more inlormatlon write the above address or call («01l ill (U61 (before May I?) 
After May 1 5 call m^) nn tut") 



' I am convinced more and more, day by day. 
that fine writing is nexl to fine doing, the top 
thing in the world. 

— |()^MKt'fl(s(l8l9) 



Clinton administration announces the 'mother of all base closings' 

Members of Congress criticize plan for its potential economic harm to certain states 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

The Soviet Union has iriimbled into a 
l(X)sc conglomerate ot hard to pronounce 
countries, Cermany is now reunited and 
trying lodominate luiroix' witli itseconomic 
rather than military might. Japiin has huilt 
the second most powerful economy in the 
world from the ashes of WWII and has 
outlawed sending tr(K)ps ahroad. 

Welcome to the end of the Cold War, 
where bombs and guns are only needed to 
keep extremist countries in line. This "new 
world order" requires a new definition for 
our nation's armed forces. That definition 
says K'tter, laster, . . . and smaller. It's the 
smaller part that's going to adversely alfect 
scores ot communities and thou.sands ot 
delense-related jobs across the nation. In 
the first step ot a pnvess started by Bush 
and carried out by (■linton,.'^l major military 
installations in 1 ^ si;ites will \x shutdown 
One hundred thiriy-tour other ba.ses will be 
scaled back and consolidated. 

What Deleiise Secreuiry Les Aspin has 
dubbed "the mother of all base closings" 
greatly accelerates the pnKessof ughtemnu 
up the I \S. military budget trom its |X"ak in 
1985. Over ttie last tour years, 44().(XX) 
defense jobs have fven eliminated. By the 
year 2(K)I, that number should reach 2.1 
million. By 1W7 the defense budget will be 
just ^percentof theOrossNationalPrinluct, 
the lowest since the bombing ot Pearl 
Harbor It the base closings of 19KH and 
i^^l are added in, the total amount of 
savings will bi" about $6.5 billion, or one- 
third ot the current budget. 

Many members of Congress are 
proiesung shutdowns that are tKCumng in 



theirdistricis. Congressman Ronald Dcllums 
of Oakland, Calitornia, is ouU"aged over the 
fact that aP hve installations in his district 
have kxm tiinjeted. During his 22 years as a 



Carolina is also seeing red. He has always 
been an advwate of reduced federal spending 
and supports a smaller military budget. But 
when referring to the proposed closing of 




representative, he has been consistently 
critical ot the military and has voted to cut 
programs aiulc lose base's in the past. iX'llums 
insists, however, thai the closings in hisdisirict 
were lor [H>liiical, not logical. reast)ns. "This 
IS Ciet)rge lUish's base-closing list, and it's 
George Rush's base -closing commission." 
he said. 

Senator Lrnesi "Frily " Hollmgs of South 



the Charleston Naval Station, he said, "The 
mother ot all base-closure lisLs clobbers 
Charleston It could bring economic rum to 
the area." Hollmgs projected that the shuiung 
down of that base will lake about S 1 billion 
out of the liKal economy, T'he job losses 
may even affect students on PC's campus. 
At least one student has expressed concerns 
about not being able to return next year due 



to the effects of this action. 

Like Dcllums, Hollings is proiesiing the 
c losing of the Charleston navy base on logicaJ 
grounds, citing a study that rales this base as 
oneofihe country's most effective. He also 
points out ihe fact thai some of ihe 
installation's faciliues will have lobe rebuilt 
on other ba.ses. However, there is little 
chance that the proposed list of closings will 
noi pass through the Congress. Five years 
ago. a bil I was passed that gave the power of 
closing and reorganizing of unnecessary 
bases lo the Pentagon, as long as the services 
can appeal to an independent base-closing 
commission. The commission will study 
A.spin's li.si and li.sten to various arguments, 
then send its retommendalion lo Congress. 
In order to prevent one or two sues being 
taken from the list for poliucal reasons. 
Congress and the president must vole lo 
accept or reject the list as a whole. Ironically, 
Congressman Dcllums helped draft the 
legislation that set up this mdei)cndeni 
commission. 

Lost in the noise over the domestic base 
shutdowns is the reciprocal closing of 
installaiion shutdowns across the globe. 
Aspin plans to list 24 siK'h faciliues in five 
counines and to reduce operations in five 
others. Out of the .V50,(KX) troops abroad, 
the Defense Secretary plans to shed about 
150,000. U.S. forces in Europe will be 
reduced from 200,000 to 1 (X),00(). and there 
IS even talk of eventually bringing that 
numbi*r to under 50,(K)0. 

The iransiuon is a painful one for many 
communiues around the US . but ii is intended 
to make the armed forces belter able to meet 
the demands of a different world than what 
we have become used to. 




FEATURES 



IKIDAY. APRIL 2\ 1W3 



I RIDAY. APRIL23, 1W3 



POLITICS 



Andy Welch introduces PC to talk radio with the Mayberry Show 




Andy Welch mans the microphone at Radio PC. Welch's show can be heard on 
Mondays from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. photo by Km Gibson 



bv Kim Kabon 

STAr-P WRITLR 

Larry King, Oprah Winlrcy, and Rush 
Limbaugh arc giant names when ii conies U) 
railioand television talk shows. However, il 
you ask a typical PC simleni lo name his 
favorite talking host, you might he suprised 
at the answer, Instead of hearing King or 
Winfrey, you mmht hear the name Andv 
Welch, 

Welch has lK\A)iiie a lalk show tavonie 
on Radu) PC 'aiIIi liis (xipular ,\la>herry 
Show, which airs on Mondav nmhis trom 
7:(K)io^>:(K)pm. 

According lo Welch, die Maylx-rry 
■Show presents controversial issues and o[vns 
campus telephone lines lor discussion, 
comments, and criticisms. Some issues ihal 
have been addressed on ihe show include 
aN)rtion, ga>s m the military, female roles 
111 society, and alliniiative action. 

In addition, the show has contronted 
local issues such as the recent S(iA election 
controversy, the possibility ol indefx-ndem 
e.xains, and ihe arrival ot the l-l A( i ( Irieiuls 
ot l.eshian ami days) group on campus, 

Welch, a iiimor, sa>s he becanu- 
interested in radio during his si)phomure 
year at l*C "Paiii Riiol introduced iiic to 



Ratlio PC, and we started doing music shows 
togeiJier," he said, 

last summer, Welch came up witii the 
idea of creating his own talk show. After 
listening to a few popular shows and 
improving his mannerisms and style, he was 
given [vrmission losuiri wiih the prixluction 
ol his own brand of i;ilk. 

Welch considers the show lo be an asset 
to the campus and lohini "The show keeps 
students inlormed and gives ihem the 
op[X)rtumiyi()coinmunicaiewith other siKial 
grou|)s. Comnuinicaiion allows the barriers 
to be broken down," he said, 

■'In addition, the show kcc[)s me 
inlormed The topics that are presented »ire 
researched and thought out. Being the 
mediator, I can't go into a show unawareo! 
all aspects, "added Welch. 

Welch reports a |X)sitive resiioiise to 
Ihe Mayberry Show thus lai He sass iluii 
an average ot 1 ."^ [X'ople call in on any given 
episode 

I lIppUvi.lH ,.!• iilV. V.lll>.l . .. liO 



[)ariicipate on the show. li'sonK when we 
speak out iliat chanee can tiapi id 

Welch. 



The Presbyterian College Writers ' Workshop 



REGISTRATION FORM 



Name 



Address 



City, State, Zip. 
Telephone ( 



. Amount enclosed 



Please place a check mark by the side of the workshops that you wish to attend You may choose two If you rhw)se two the workshop 
staff will assign you to Round I IFridayj and Round 2 (Saturday) Check also in the appropriate spare lo submit a manuscript in advance 
for consideration by the workshop leader All manuscripts should be mailed by l^ay 1 5 to the address tielow Write prominently on the 
back ol the envelope the workshop lor which you wish the manuscript to be considered Remember to place a f heck mark below opposite 
the manuscript type to Indicate that you will be sending it by May I "> Workshop leaders may admit (wrticip.ints who havp not sulmiilted 
manscripis as auditors 



WORKSHOP 


WORKSHOP LEADER 


MANUSCRIPT 1 


. 1 Writing fiction 


Scott Ely 


Onechapler or story | 


.2 Writing Poetry 


Susan l.udvigson 


Five poems ' 


.1 Writing for Ihe Stage 


Ion Tuttle 


A one art play ol i 
not more than 2S p,iges or i 
a scene from a play with » i 
paragraph synopsis of play i 


4 Creative Non-Fiction 


lames Kilgo 


One example | 



All participants will hear Stephen Corey give three sessions on editing for publication In addition, all workshop leaders will give rradings 
from their works 

It is p<issihle Ihal workshops will fill up quickly In Ihe event that Ihey do, please write below the numbers of workshops that you would 

prefer as alternates for those you have selected 

Alternate One # Alternate Two # Alternate Three » 



Writers of all ages ct)nstamlv seaivT, loi v«,a\s to 

improve their skills. Presbyteriati (\)lleues Russell 

Program Steering ( ornmittee and linglish Departtiieiit 

nave asseinhled a nationally renownetl stalT ol" 

professionals who will help uniers of all ages and 

abilities improve their work diirmg the co!le;'e\ 1*)W^ 

Writers' Workshop. 

During the workshop, you'll learn more about 

poetry, fiction, drama, ami nuich more. And, you may 

share a table at lunch and exchange ideas with a 
published author. You may alst) have vour own works 

critKiued during two interestinu and informative 

workshop sessions. And you wilfhear a famous editor 

give advice on publicalion. 

It you wish, you may stav in a comfortable new 

residence hall on Presbyterian College's oak lailen 

campus. Packages are also available which include all 

meals Or, you may choose lo tiavei to campus lt)r the 

vvorkshops and aclivities. 

Whatever your pleasure, we invite vou tt) experience 

what has thrilled I^»pe. Keats, and countless others 

throughout histor\ ihkI writin*-' 



Accommodations will be provided in Presbyterian College residence halls and meals will be served in Greenville Dining Hall at tfie I 

cr)llege Please check Ihe arrangement you prefer and enclose a (he(k lor that amount Registration deadline loiKxim and meals IS May I I /l m^ mi/iniutr i 4 J I r t 

26 (Other acromodations are available in liK^^almcrtels for those who wish to make their own arrangements I ' ' *^''l y-UflvlrliCU rrlOf^ QHU ^MOH^ ddU uU ddU 



FEES (N«M-R«fiiidabl«): 

S«0 00 Covers registration, room and meals 

S65 00 Covers registration and meals 

_____ $H 00 Ccjvers registration and room 
$H 00 Covers registration 

Please complete and return this form with check made payable to Presbyterian College to 

Writoi* Woriuhep 
Praabytortaii Cod«g« 
dlatoa, S,C, 2f 129 

Fof more Information write the above address or call |(M)1) 8H (M61 (before May 1^) 
After May O call (AOl) All BM) 



that fine writing is next to fine doing, ihe top 
thing in the world. 

— \ohn Keats (\8\9) 



Clinton administration announces the 'mother of all base closings' 

Members of Congress criticize plan for its potential economic harm to certain states 



by Ted Carmlchael 
POLITICS BDITOR 

The Soviet Union has crumbled into a 
l(X)se conglofTicraie of hard to pronounce 
counines. (icrmany is now reunited iind 
trying todoniinatelujrojx' with itsect)notiiic 
rather than nnlitiiry might. Japan has built 
the second mt)st powerful economy in the 
world from the ashes of WWII and has 
outlawed sending tr(K)ps abroad. 

Welcome to the end of the Cold War, 
where bombs and guns are only needed to 
keepexu-ennsl countries in line. This "new 
world order" requires a new definition for 
our nation's armed h)rces That definition 
says fK'iter, faster, . . . and smaller. It's the 
smaller part that's going to adversely affect 
scores of cotnm unities and thousands ot 
defense-relaied jobs across the nation. In 
the tirsi step of a prcKCSs started by Bush 
and carried out by Clinton,'^ I major military 
insiallations in I S stales will be shutdown. 
One hundred thirty-four other bases will be 
scaled back and consolidated. 

What Delense Secreuiry l.es Aspin has 
dubbed "the mother of all base closings" 
greatly accelerates the pnKessol iighienini; 
up the [ 'S. military budget from its [K-ak in 
19KS. Over the last four years, 44(),(XK) 
defense jobs have been eliminated. By the 
year 20()I, that number sht)uld reacli 2.1 
million. By lW7the defense budgeiwillbe 
just ^ptTcent of the Cross NauonalPr(Hluct, 
the lowest since the bombing ol fVvirl 
Harbor, If the base closings of 19HK and 
IWj are added in, the total amount of 
savings will be atHuil Sb,*) billion, or onc- 
ihird ot the current budget. 

Many members of Congress are 
protesung shutdowns that are tKCumng m 



their districts. Congressman Ronald fXMIums 
of Oakland, Caldomia, is ouu^aged over the 
fact that al' hve installations in his district 
have been t^iri^eted, Durini.' his 22 years as a 



Carolina is also seeing red. He hxs always 
been an advocate of reduced federal spending 
and supports a smaller military budget. But 
when referring to the proposed closing of 




representative, he has been consistently 
critical of the nnlitary and has voted to cut 
programs andclose bases in the past. LX'llunis 
insists, however, that theclosings in hisdisirict 
were for political, not logical, reasons "This 
IS Ciei)rge Bush's base-closing list, and it's 
George Bush's base -closing commissHm," 
he s;ud. 

Senator Hmest "Irit/ " Hollings of South 



the Charleston Naval Stauon. he said, "The 
mother of all base-closure lists clohhers 
Charleston. It could bring economic ruin lo 
the area." Hollings projected that the shuiung 
di)wn of that base will take aKnii S 1 billion 
out of the liKal economy. The job los.ses 
may even affect students on K"s campus. 
,\l least one student has expressed concerns 
alx)ut not being able to return next year due 



to the effects of this action. 

Like Dellums, Hollings is protesting the 
closing of the Charleston navy baseon logical 
grounds, c lUng a study that rales this base as 
one of the country's most effective. He also 
points out the fact that some of the 
installation's faciliues will have to be rebuilt 
on other bases. However, there is little 
chance that the proposed list of closings will 
not pa.ss through the Congress. Five years 
ago. a bill was passed that gave the power of 
closing and re -organizing of unnecessary 
bases to the Pentagon, as long as the services 
can appeal to an independent base-closing 
commission. The commission will study 
Aspin 's list and listen to various arguments, 
then send its recommendation to Congress. 
In order to prevent one or two sites being 
taken from the list for poliucal reasons. 
Congress and the president must vote to 
accept or reject the list as a whole. Ironically, 
Congressman Dellums helped draft the 
legislation that set up this independent 
commission. 

Lost in the noise over the domestic base 
shutdowns is the reciprocal closing of 
installation shutdowns across the globe. 
Aspin plans to list 24 such laciliues in five 
countries and to reduce operauons in five 
others. Out of the .\S(),(K)() troops abroad, 
the IX" tense Secretary plans to shed about 
150,000. U.S. forces in Europe will be 
reduced from 2{X),0(X) to 100,000, and there 
IS even talk of eventually bringing that 
number to under 5(),(XX). 

The transition is a painful one for many 
communiuesaround the US, but It IS intended 
to make the armed forces better able to meet 
the demands of a different world than what 
we have become used to. 




POLITICS 



8 



IK I DAY. APRIL 23, \'m 



[RIDAV. APRIL :>, 1W3 



SPORTS 



Russia in state of political turmoil 



by Ted Carmichael 

POLITICS EDITOR 

Since the Soviet Union collapsed 
in December of 1991, Russia has 
been staiggling to form a stable 
democratic government and to make 
the transformation from a command 
to a market-oriented economy. The 
transition, however, has been 
difficult. Their economy is in 
shambles, and internal power 
struggles may not only hamper the 
reform process but may reverse it 
altogether. 

Yeltsin, the populist president 
of Russia, and Ruslin Khasbulatov, 
the chairman of the Supreme Soviet, 
had a face-off over which body has 
the power to rule the country. The 
deputies of the parliament 
overwhelmingly voted to nullify all 
previous agreements to share 
governing power with the president. 
They also banned the upcoming 
national referendum on whether 
Russia should be a parliamentary or 
presidential republic, removed the 
president's power to issue decrees, 
and took control of the Cabinet. 
After failing to reach a compromise 
with the Congress on Friday, an ill- 
tempered Yeltsin walked out of the 
hall of the Great Kremlin Palace. 

Yeltsin has since said that he 
and his people will still hold some 
kind of referendum on power 
sharing, a move that the deputies 
warned would be unconstitutional. 
Yeltsin still holds considerable 
power in Russia. Parliment is not 
prepared to run the day-to-day 
affairs of the executive branch. 
Besides that, the parliament was 
"elected" when communists were 
still running the country. Only 
Yeltsin w